Roadkill Still Illegal to Possess on Jan. 1, Despite Passage of the “Wildlife Traffic Safety Act”

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) reminds the public it is still illegal to collect or possess roadkill animals and violators could face citation, even after Jan. 1, 2020. SB 395 – Chapter 869 (Archuleta), also known as the “Wildlife Traffic Safety Act,” was enacted with the intent to eventually make available for utilization the roadkill meat of deer, elk, pronghorn antelope or wild pig.

However, the legislative language does not permit the general public collection and utilization of roadkill animals, but rather authorizes development of a program for what the bill describes as “salvageable wild game meat.” Such a program is not yet in place, contrary to many news articles and social media traffic.

SB 395 only authorizes the California Fish and Game Commission to adopt regulations, in consultation with the California Department of Transportation, California Highway Patrol and the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, to establish such a salvageable wild game meat utilization program. It would mandate any such program to include a permit and a reporting process.

“Many Californians think it will be legal to possess and utilize roadkill on Jan. 1, which is the  technical effective date of the Wildlife Traffic Safety Act, but that’s not the case,” said  David Bess, CDFW Deputy Director and Chief of the Law Enforcement Division. “There is no collection or utilization program in place. We are trying to avoid any confusion by misinformed citizens who think it is lawful to collect roadkill animals.”

In addition, SB 395 authorizes CDFW to create a roadkill reporting database to help wildlife managers identify the places where wildlife/vehicle collisions are most common. Data from such a reporting system could support wildlife conservation efforts conducted through regional conservation investment strategies. That program is also not yet in place. However, the University of California, Davis has a public reporting system called the California Roadkill Observation System (CROS) that is currently operational. Any citizen can contribute roadkill data and photos to CROS, either anonymously or as a registered user.

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Media Contacts:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement Division, (916) 651-6692

Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

California Fish and Game Commission Meets in Sacramento

At its December 2019 meeting in Sacramento, the California Fish and Game Commission  took action on a number of issues affecting California’s natural resources. The following are just a few items of interest from the two-day meeting.

The Commission made a listing decision under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA) regarding the foothill yellow-legged frog. Due to the level of genetic divergence, geographic isolation, and differing levels of imperilment between populations and threats within these populations, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) recommended separating the listing into different clades for the foothill yellow-legged frog. The Commission’s decision was consistent with that recommendation. The Commission listed the Southern Sierra, Central Coast and South Coast clades as endangered under CESA, and the Feather River and Northern Sierra clades as threatened under CESA. The Commission also decided that listing the North Coast clade is not warranted at this time. The Commission is scheduled to adopt findings for the decision at its February 2020 meeting.

The Commission recognized five newly inducted members of the California Waterfowler’s Hall of Fame. This year’s inductees are L. Ryan Broddrick, Dean A. Cortopassi, John M. Eadie, Richard Janson and Mickey W. Saso. The California Waterfowler’s Hall of Fame was established in 2006 to recognize those individuals who have made significant contributions to enhancing waterfowl and their habitats in California.

After hearing from numerous Delta anglers, the Commission voted to postpone adoption of a Delta Fisheries Management Policy and potential amendments to the Commission’s Striped Bass Policy to a future meeting.

Successful and sound management of game populations has allowed for the Commission to authorize publication of notice to amend hunting regulations for big game mammals and waterfowl. Amendments to be considered include additional hunting opportunities in some elk and desert bighorn sheep zones where populations continue to thrive, and new hunting opportunities for veterans and active military personnel for waterfowl hunting.

The Commission authorized publication of notice to amend the regulations for CDFW lands to add properties to the lists of wildlife areas and ecological reserves, and to remove properties from those lists for which CDFW no longer has management authority. This focused regulatory package also proposes authorization of new site-specific public uses, as well as other amendments to address operational or public safety concerns.

The Commission received an annual report from CDFW on management activities of the Statewide Marine Protected Area Program and heard other marine-related items.

The Commission also elected to move the dates of the next meeting to Feb. 20-21, 2020 with marine items being heard on the first day and wildlife items on the second day.

Commission President Eric Sklar, Vice President Jacque Hostler-Carmesin and Commissioner Samantha Murray were present. Commissioners Russell Burns and Peter Silva were absent.

The full Commission agenda for this meeting along with supporting information is available at www.fgc.ca.gov. An archived video will also be available in coming days.

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The California Fish and Game Commission was the first wildlife conservation agency in the United States, predating even the U.S. Commission of Fish and Fisheries. There is often confusion about the distinction between the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and the Commission. In the most basic terms, CDFW implements and enforces the regulations set by the Commission, as well as provides biological data and expertise to inform the Commission’s decision-making process.

Little North Fork of the Navarro River, Mendocino County.

CDFW Awards $10.1 Million for Fisheries Habitat Restoration and Forest Legacy Projects

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) today announced the selection of 31 projects that will receive funding for the restoration, enhancement and protection of anadromous salmonid habitat in California watersheds, as well as forest legacy restoration.

The grants, which total $10.1 million, are distributed through CDFW’s Fisheries Restoration Grant Program (FRGP). They include $256,440 allocated for timber legacy restoration projects and approximately $9.8 million for anadromous salmonid restoration projects. FRGP monies come from a combination of state sources and the federal Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund.

“We are excited to further the restoration of river ecosystems critical to California’s salmon and steelhead,” CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham said. “Several of this year’s projects incorporate process-based restoration to address the root of ecological degradation and benefits all species using the waterway, including salmonids.”

In response to the 2019 Fisheries Habitat Restoration Grant Solicitation, CDFW received 70 proposals requesting more than $38 million in funding. All proposals underwent an initial administrative review. Those that passed were then evaluated through a technical review process that included reviews by CDFW and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists.

The 31 approved projects will further the objectives of state and federal fisheries recovery plans, including removing barriers to fish migration, restoring riparian habitat, monitoring of listed populations and creating a more resilient and sustainably managed water resources system (e.g., water supply, water quality and habitat) that can better withstand drought conditions. These projects further the goals of California’s Water Action Plan and CDFW’s State Wildlife Action Plan, as well as addressing limiting factors specified in state and federal recovery plans.

The list of approved projects is available on the FRGP web page.

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Media Contacts:
Matt Wells, CDFW Watershed Restoration Grants Branch, (916) 445-1285
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

CDFW Reminds Residents to Wildlife-Proof Homes for the Winter

With winter around the corner and temperatures dropping, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) urges the public to winterize homes and other buildings to prevent wildlife from taking up residence.

This time of year, wild animals are busy preparing for the colder months to come. Bears are looking for dens to hibernate and smaller animals, such as raccoons, are seeking warm and dry places to nest such as attics, under decks, porches, chimneys and even drainpipes.

In bear country, crawl spaces under homes make a great bear den, but bears can damage insulation, wiring and pipes, posing a hazard both to themselves and to the human residents. Female bears often give birth to cubs while denning, and a family group of three or four bears could end up living under a single house. It would be difficult to evict and move them to a suitable location in their natural habitat.

Wildlife require food, water and shelter, just as people do, but it is best to keep them in their natural habitat and not under your house or in your attic. Here are a few tips to help winterize your home:

  • Inspect entire foundation of homes and other buildings for the smallest of openings.
  • Secure all crawl spaces, doors and openings that provide open access for wildlife.
  • If the dwelling will be unoccupied for the winter, remove all food – even canned goods and spices.
  • Clean the floors, counters and cabinets of unoccupied dwelling with ammonia-based products before closing for the winter.
  • Secure pet doors at night. Close for the winter if unoccupied.
  • Remove trellises, vines, shrubs and tree limbs that may give wildlife access to the roof and attic.
  • Repair shingles on the roof and repair holes near eaves.
  • Cover your chimney with heavy mesh wire to prevent access into the house or nesting in the chimney.

For more information, please visit CDFW’s new Living With Wildlife webpage.

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Media Contacts:
Lesa Johnston, CDFW Education and Outreach, (916) 322-8933
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

 

CDFW Celebrates Earth Day

Monday, April 22 is the 49th annual Earth Day and the 2019 theme is “Protect Our Species.” The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) works to protect our state’s native species every day of every year.

CDFW performs and oversees wildlife habitat conservation and restoration to maintain healthy ecosystems throughout the state. No matter where a native plant, fish or animal lives—in a marine, brackish or fresh water environment, on land, in trees or underground—all living things need clean, healthy habitats.

Some people see a wetland, grassland, desert or any undeveloped landscape and think, “There’s nothing there.” But there are numerous plant, animal and fish species living there, hidden underwater, underground, under rocks and in rock crevices. Those “unused” spaces are home to many species that are part of the elaborate web of life on which all living things depend.

In the past, people thought natural resources—like fresh, potable water—were unlimited. We know better now, yet still produce millions of tons of garbage each year and often dispose of it in ways that harm wildlife. With more than seven billion people on the planet, such a careless lifestyle causes irreparable damage to the very ecosystems all forms of life need to live.

It’s easy to reduce, reuse and recycle the products we use each day. And when we do, our behavior benefits wildlife as much as it does ourselves.

Californians have been celebrating Earth Day with festivals, learning opportunities, and activities such as trail and habitat clean-up and restoration since 1970. It’s a day to think about how each of us affects our world’s limited natural resources, and what we can do as individuals or as groups to tread lightly on the Earth, make up for past damage and restore what we can.

For links to environmentally healthy living suggestions, Earth Day festivals and other activities throughout California, please visit CalRecycle’s Earth Day webpage.

CDFW staff will participate in Earth Day activities around the state, and would be pleased to discuss ways we can conserve wildlife with you at any of these events.

Saturday, April 20
Newport Beach: Upper Newport Bay Earth Day event, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Peter & Mary Muth Interpretive Center. CDFW ecological reserve Science Discovery booth.

Fresno: Earth Day festival in Radio Park. Booth with animal mounts and information about CDFW and volunteering. Live music, green vendors, EV test drives, food, kids’ activities.

April 22 and 23
Rancho Cordova: The Nimbus Hatchery preschool story time program, Tot Time, will feature an Earth Day theme.

Sunday, April 28
Sacramento: Earth Day Festival at Southside Park. CDFW will have hands-on children’s activities and the Salmon Wheel of Fortune.

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Media Contact:
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420