Tag Archives: Trout

Map-based Sport Fishing Regulations Offers Ease of Use for Anglers

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has launched a beta release of an online location-based Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations tool to help anglers identify those regulations that relate to the area they plan to fish. The new tool provides an easy way for anglers to find the sections of the regulations that are relevant to them.

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The new fishing regulations tool can be found at https://map.dfg.ca.gov/sportfishingregs/. It is designed to work on a smart phone, tablet or desktop computer.

When accessed from a smart phone or a tablet with GPS, the map-based tool will automatically present the angler with the sport fishing regulations that apply to their current location based on the GPS in the device. When accessed from a tablet without GPS or from a desktop computer, the user can click anywhere on the map to discover the regulations for that area.

The new tool includes the Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations booklet, found on our Regulations webpage at www.wildlife.ca.gov/regulations.

The regulations are also now available in the existing Fishing Guide, available at www.wildlife.ca.gov/fishing/guide.

“This is a big step forward in making the complex fishing regulations more accessible to the angling community,” said CDFW Acting Fisheries Branch Chief Roger Bloom. “As we continue to simplify our fishing regulations, they will be kept up-to-date within this new tool.”

This is a beta release that CDFW staff will be actively working to improve. CDFW welcomes comments or suggestions for improvement. Please send feedback to fishingguide@wildlife.ca.gov.

Media Contacts:
Roger Bloom, CDFW Fisheries Branch, (916) 445-3777
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

CDFW to Move Rescued Fish Back into Merced River

Media Contacts:
Greg Kollenborn, CDFW Central Region, (559) 243-4014 ext. 257
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) on Friday plans to release approximately 600 rainbow trout that were rescued from the lower Merced River a year and a half ago.

In the summer of 2014, water flowing from Lake McClure was too warm for these fish in the Merced River to survive and emergency action was taken to rescue 60 adult rainbow trout from the river between Crocker-Huffman Dam and the Snelling Road Bridge in Merced County.

“As a general rule, CDFW does not normally rescue fish unless they are a threatened or endangered species,” said Greg Kollenborn, CDFW Senior Hatchery Manager. “In this case, the drought forced us to take action to preserve an important species in Central California.”

The fish were transferred to CDFW’s Merced River Fish Hatchery near Snelling and housed in temperature-controlled fish-rearing tanks that were purchased with emergency drought funds made available by the Legislature and Governor. Keeping the fish in these tanks was also a precautionary measure to prent the spread of disease to fish in the hatchery.

CDFW originally intended to release the fish in the winter of 2014 but the ongoing drought and high water temperatures forced a delay of the release. The fish remained in the hatchery for an extra year, where they spawned and produced hundreds of offspring.

“In 18 months we went from 60 to 600 fish,” said Kollenborn. “Releasing them now will give local anglers a great opportunity to catch some nice fish this summer.”

Once the fish are released, CDFW scientists will monitor and survey the river to monitor the health of the trout populations.

Free Fishing Day is Saturday, Sept. 5

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) invites all Californians to celebrate the end of summer by going fishing. Sept. 5 is the second of two Free Fishing Days in 2015, when people can try their hand at fishing without having to buy a sport fishing license. Free Fishing Days are also a great opportunity for licensed anglers to introduce non-angling friends and children to fishing and the outdoors.

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All fishing regulations, such as bag and size limits, gear restrictions, report card requirements, fishing hours and stream closures remain in effect. Every angler must have an appropriate report card if they are fishing for abalone, steelhead or sturgeon anywhere in the state, or salmon in the Smith and Klamath-Trinity river systems.

CDFW offers two Free Fishing Days each year – usually around the Fourth of July and Labor Day weekend – when it’s legal to fish without a sport fishing license. This year, the Free Fishing Days were set for the Saturdays near Independence Day and Labor Day (this year, July 4 and Sept. 5).

Free Fishing Days provide a low-cost way to give fishing a try. Some CDFW regions offer Fishing in the City, a program where children can learn to fish in major metropolitan areas. Fishing in the City and Free Fishing Day clinics are designed to educate novice anglers about fishing ethics, fish habits, effective methods for catching fish and fishing tackle. Anglers can even learn how to clean and prepare fish for eating.

Anglers should check the rules and regulations for the waters they plan to fish because wildlife officers will be on duty to enforce them. For more information on Free Fishing Days, please visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/licensing/fishing/free-fishing-days.

Media Contacts:
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944
Kyle Murphy, CDFW Fisheries Branch, (916) 323-5556

Nimbus Hatchery to Host Speaker Series

Media Contacts:

Laura Drath, CDFW Interpretive Services, (916) 358-2884
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

The public is invited to attend a presentation on the effects of the ongoing drought on salmon and steelhead trout in the American River. The event will be held at the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center in Rancho Cordova on May 3 at 11 a.m. It is the first of three planned speaker sessions at Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center this spring.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Senior Environmental Scientist Rob Titus will address the state of the salmon and steelhead runs and the challenges the drought poses to their survival. Titus will also outline actions CDFW is taking to protect these fish and increase their survival rates. Forest Williams of the Sacramento County Water Agency will then describe ways the public can reduce water use and lessen human impact on the river. Both speakers will field questions from the audience.

The event is free and preregistration is not required. Future sessions in the speaker series will include Climate Change and its Effects on Salmon and Steelhead in June and Fishing the American River in July.

Nimbus Hatchery is located at 2001 Nimbus Road in Rancho Cordova. The hatchery offers hands-on exhibits, a river bluff trail, a play area for children and opportunities to feed fish. It is open daily to the public free of charge from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekends.

For more information about the speaker series, please call (916) 358-2884 or visit the hatchery online at www.facebook.com/NimbusHatchery.

 

Anglers Urged to Return Fish Tags in Timely Manner

North coast steelhead and salmon anglers are reminded to return fish tags to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) in a timely manner. Tag return information is a vital tool for biologists as they calculate harvest and estimate population size of Chinook, coho and steelhead runs.

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“We’ve had people send us huge envelopes with several years’ worth of tags, but the information is only useful in the same season the fish are caught, ” said Mary Claire Kier, CDFW Trinity River Project Environmental Scientist. “We need anglers to send in their tags right away, before they get lost or forgotten in tackle boxes or pockets of fishing vests.”

Please return all Trinity River fish tags, by mail or in person, to:

California Department of Fish and Wildlife
5341 Ericson Way
Arcata, CA  95521

A tag return form can be found online at http://www.dfg.ca.gov/fish/Fishing/Monitoring/FTag/.  Anglers can also simply send the tags wrapped in or taped to a piece of paper with their name, address, date and location that the fish was caught or the tag was found. Please specify if the fish was caught live or found dead, or if the tag was found loose. If the tag was found on a caught fish, please note whether the fish was kept or released.

If the tag is being returned by mail, please cut the knot off of the tag as the knot can cause the envelope to catch in the postal sorting equipment.

Media Contacts:
Mary Claire Kier, CDFW Trinity River Project, (707) 822-5876  
Harry Morse, CDFW Communications, (916) 323-1478

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