Tag Archives: Salmon

CDFW Plans Public Meetings on Water Use and Native Fishery Impacts in South Bay Coastal Counties

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), in collaboration with the Santa Cruz and San Mateo Resource Conservation Districts and the State Water Resources Control Board, will hold two public meetings to address how residents can contribute to water conservation efforts that will help save native fisheries. The streams in this area are home to the last remaining coho salmon populations south of the Golden Gate Bridge.

The meetings will be held at the following times and locations:

Wednesday, June 1

6:30 to 8 p.m.
Resource Center for Non Violence
612 Ocean Street
Santa Cruz (95060)

Thursday, June 2

6:30 to 8 p.m.
Pescadero Native Sons Community Hall
112 Stage Road
Pescadero (94060)

The watersheds of Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties constitute the southern end of the natural range of coho salmon in California. Ongoing drought conditions were not significantly affected by this winter’s rains, and coho and steelhead trout in this region continue to face severe obstacles to population recovery. Wild coho salmon are drastically depleted – from San Gregorio and Pescadero creeks in coastal San Mateo County to the San Lorenzo River and Soquel and Aptos creeks in Santa Cruz County.  Reduced stream flow has resulted in a series of disconnected pools, trapping juvenile fish and exposing them to increased threats.

The meetings will provide an opportunity to discuss the reliability of the local water supply and offer information to residents who are not on municipal water supply. Landowners in coastal watersheds that depend on water from wells or stream diversions will learn what they can do to reduce their impacts on threatened or endangered native fish species, as well as comply with state water use and reporting requirements.

Grant funding opportunities that may be available for water conservation and water storage projects will also be reviewed at these public meetings.

“Water conservation in these critical watersheds needs to be a daily commitment,” said Eric Larson, an environmental program manager with CDFW. “The information provided at these meetings will illustrate water conservation methods that have been effective in similar settings.”

Media Contacts:
David Moore, CDFW Bay Delta Region, (707) 766-8380
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

 

 

Recreational Ocean Salmon Fishing Opens North of Horse Mountain May 16

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) announces the recreational ocean salmon season in the Klamath Management Zone (KMZ), the area between the Oregon/California border and Horse Mountain (40° 05’ 00” N. latitude), will open May 16, making all ocean waters in California available to salmon fishing. The season will continue through May 31 and reopen June 16-30, July 16-Aug. 16, and Sept.  1-5 with a 20-inch minimum size limit.

Anglers fishing in the KMZ should be conscious of closures at the mouths of the Klamath and Smith rivers throughout the season, as well as a closure at the mouth of the Eel River during August and September. See California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 27.75 for complete river mouth closure information.

In the Fort Bragg area, which extends from Horse Mountain to Point Arena (38° 57’ 30” N. latitude), the season will remain open through Nov.  13 with a 20-inch minimum size limit. In the San Francisco area, which extends from Point Arena to Pigeon Point (37° 11’ 00” N. latitude), the season will continue through Oct. 31 with a 24-inch minimum size limit through April 30 and 20-inches thereafter.  In the Monterey area between Pigeon Point and Point Sur (36° 18’ 00” N. latitude) the season will continue through July 15 while areas south of Point Sur will continue through May 31. The minimum size limit in Monterey and areas south is 24-inches total length.

CDFW and the Pacific Fishery Management Council have constructed ocean salmon seasons to reduce fishery-related impacts on endangered Sacramento River winter Chinook. Drought conditions and unsuitable water temperatures in the upper Sacramento River led to greater than 95 percent mortality of juvenile brood year 2014 and 2015 winter-run Chinook. Coupled with abnormally warm and unproductive ocean conditions, fisheries managers and industry representatives chose to take additional protections beyond those required by the Endangered Species Act biological opinion and harvest control rule.

Available ocean data suggest that winter-run Chinook are concentrated south of Pigeon Point, especially south of Point Sur, during the late summer and early fall. Strategic closures and size limit restrictions implemented in the San Francisco and Monterey management areas are intended to minimize harvest and catch-and-release mortality of winter-run Chinook.

The daily bag limit is two Chinook per day and no more than two daily bag limits may be possessed when on land. On a vessel in ocean waters, no person shall possess or bring ashore more than one daily bag limit.

For anglers fishing north of Point Conception (34° 27’ 00” N. latitude), no more than two single-point, single-shank barbless hooks shall be used, and no more than one rod may be used per angler when fishing for salmon or fishing from a boat with salmon on board. In addition, barbless circle hooks are required when fishing with bait by any means other than trolling between Horse Mountain and Point Conception.

CDFW reminds anglers that retention of coho salmon is prohibited in all ocean fisheries.

Final sport regulations will be published in the CDFW 2016 Supplemental Fishing Regulations booklet available in May at www.wildlife.ca.gov/regulations. For complete ocean salmon regulations, please visit CDFW’s ocean salmon webpage at www.wildlife.ca.gov/oceansalmon or call the Ocean Salmon Regulations Hotline at (707) 576-3429.

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Media Contacts:
 Jennifer Simon, CDFW Marine Region, (707) 576-2878

Carrie Wilson, CDFW Communications, (831) 649-7191

Sacramento River Closure to Go Into Effect April 1

A temporary emergency regulation closing all fishing within 5.5 miles of spawning habitat on the Upper Sacramento River begins on April 1, 2016 and will remain in effect through July 31, 2016. Enhanced protective measures are also proposed in the ocean sport and commercial salmon fisheries regulations for the 2016 season.

The temporary emergency regulation closes all fishing on the 5.5 mile stretch of the Sacramento River from the Highway 44 Bridge where it crosses the Sacramento River upstream to Keswick Dam. The area is currently closed to salmon fishing but was open to trout fishing. The temporary closure will protect critical spawning habitat and eliminate any incidental stress or hooking mortality of winter-run Chinook salmon by anglers.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) scientists believe the additional protection provided in the emergency river closure and potential ocean fishing restrictions will help avoid a third year of substantial winter-run Chinook salmon loss.

Historically, winter-run Chinook spawned in the upper reaches of Sacramento River tributaries, including the McCloud, Pit, and Little Sacramento rivers. Shasta and Keswick dams now block access to the historic spawning areas. Winter-run Chinook, however, were able to take advantage of cool summer water releases downstream of Keswick Dam. In the 1940s and 1950s, the population recovered, but beginning in 1970, the population experienced a dramatic decline, to a low of approximately 200 spawners by the early 1990s. The run was classified as endangered under the state Endangered Species Act in 1989, and as endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1994.

The Fish and Game Commission adopted CDFW’s proposal for the 2016 temporary closure at its regularly scheduled February meeting.

Media Contact:
Jason Roberts, CDFW Northern Region, (530) 225-2131
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

CDFW to Host Public Meeting on Ocean Salmon Fisheries

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) invites the public to attend its upcoming annual Ocean Salmon Information Meeting. A review of last year’s ocean salmon fisheries and spawning escapement will be presented, in addition to the outlook for this year’s sport and commercial ocean salmon fisheries.

The meeting will be held Wednesday, March 2 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Sonoma County Water Agency, 404 Aviation Blvd. in Santa Rosa (95403).

Anglers are encouraged to provide input on potential fishing seasons to a panel of California salmon scientists, managers and representatives who will be directly involved in the upcoming Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) meetings in March and April.

Salmon fishing seasons are developed through a collaborative process involving the PFMC, the California Fish and Game Commission and the National Marine Fisheries Service. Public input will help California representatives negotiate a broad range of season alternatives during the PFMC March 9-14 meeting in Sacramento.

The 2016 Ocean Salmon Information Meeting marks the beginning of a two-month long public process used to establish annual sport and commercial ocean salmon seasons. A list of additional meetings and other opportunities for public comment is available on CDFW’s ocean salmon webpage, www.wildlife.ca.gov/fishing/ocean/regulations/salmon/preseason.

The meeting agenda and handouts will be posted online as soon as they become available.

Media Contacts:
Kandice Morgenstern, CDFW Marine Region, (707) 576-2879
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

State Agencies to Hold Informational Meeting for Creekside Landowners in Russian River Watershed

Media Contacts:
David Moore, CDFW Bay Delta Region, (707) 766-8380
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

The State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) are jointly hosting a public meeting for landowners in the Russian River Watershed on Tuesday, Jan. 26. Staff from the two departments will provide information about residents’ water rights, the reliability of their water supply and actions they can take to reduce impacts on salmon and steelhead fisheries.

A variety of representatives from state, federal, county and local agencies will be on hand to answer questions, including the Sonoma and Gold Ridge Resource Conservation Districts and other entities with knowledge of the area. Key topics include compliance with water reporting requirements and grant funding opportunities for water conservation and water storage projects.

The meeting will take place at the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board Hearings Room, 5550 Skylane Blvd., Suite A, Santa Rosa (95404). It is an “open house” format and attendees may stop by anytime between 3-7 p.m. Please RSVP t(916) 319-0631 (reservations are not required, but are appreciated).

Despite recent rains, the state remains in drought status. The Russian River Watershed is critical habitat for endangered coho salmon, and water usage impacts the species. Late last summer, some residents and area businesses took actions to enhance creek flows in some areas. Their efforts were a welcome contribution to the state’s efforts to help the salmon, and scientists hope to encourage others to take similar measures.

To receive additional information, subscribe to the State Water Board’s “California Water Action Plan/Statewide Instream Flows” email list located under “Water Rights” at the following webpage: www.waterboards.ca.gov/resources/email_subscriptions/swrcb_subscribe.shtml.