Tag Archives: oil spill

Cleanup, air monitoring ongoing after pipeline spill in Ventura

For Immediate Release
Unified Command

Ventura, Calif. – A multi-agency response has been established to manage cleanup operations in the area impacted by a June 23 pipeline spill in Hall Canyon, Ventura.

There have been no oiled wildlife observed or reported, and no oil has reached the ocean or other water.

Cleanup crews remain on-scene containing and recovering the oil. Resources include 98 responders and five vacuum trucks. Air monitoring is being continually conducted to assure safety of responders and residents in the area.  

The cause of the spill is under investigation. The unified command response will be independent of that investigation and includes representatives from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Crimson Pipeline, which has taken responsibility for the incident.

The public and media are advised to avoid the impacted area and keep pets on leashes. In addition, they should not attempt to rescue any observed oiled wildlife. Untrained individuals who attempt to rescue wildlife may cause more harm than good and may injure themselves in the process.

The number to report oiled wildlife is 877 UCD-OWCN (823-6926).

Residents wishing to file a claim can do so via email at claims@crimsonpl.com or by calling 562-285-4128. 

For more information, visit http://www.wildlife.ca.gov/OSPR/CalSpillWatch

Contacts

Eric Laughlin, Cal Fish and Wildlife, 916-214-3279
Kendall Klingler, Crimson Pipeline, 314-574-1875

 

Butte County Receives Local Spill Response Equipment

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR) oversaw the delivery of oil spill response equipment and training for Butte County first responders today. Butte County is the fifth inland area awarded the spill equipment grant since OSPR expanded its preparedness activities statewide.

“This grant ensures Butte County is prepared in the event of an oil spill. Oroville is one community in the county with a long history of rail traffic with the potential for impacts to the nearby Feather River and Lake Oroville,” said OSPR’s Local Government Outreach and Grant Coordinator Cindy Murphy.

The Butte County Fire Department received the $30,000 grant that provides 1,000 feet of containment boom, absorbent materials, a mobile trailer, and eight hours of training. The equipment will strengthen oil spill preparedness and response at the Lower Feather River.

Today’s training included a four hour classroom instruction session, followed by four hours of on-water equipment deployment with spill response professionals.

OSPR began offering equipment grants in 2007 and it has since provided over $1 million to more than 40 local government agencies and tribes in California.

Equipment grants are available to any local public agency or tribe in the state. In order to be considered, agencies must be at risk of an oil spill occurring in their jurisdiction. The Response Equipment Grant Program webpage offers more information.

Siskiyou County Receives Equipment and Training for Oil Spill Response

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR) oversaw the delivery of oil spill response equipment and training for Siskiyou County first responders today. Siskiyou County is the fourth inland area awarded the spill equipment grant since OSPR expanded its preparedness activities statewide in 2014.

“For 25 years, we’ve protected the coast from oil spills. Now we want to bring the same level of protection to communities that have a long history of rail traffic and potential river impacts,” said OSPR’s Local Government Outreach and Grant Coordinator Scott Lipton. “It’s crucial that we all work together to protect these vital areas.”

Siskiyou County Environmental Health Department received the $30,000 grant that provides 1,000 feet of containment boom, absorbent materials, a mobile trailer and eight hours of training. The equipment will strengthen oil spill preparedness and response at the Upper Sacramento River.

Today’s training included a four -hour classroom instruction session, followed by four hours of on-water equipment deployment with spill response professionals.

“On behalf of Siskiyou County First Responders and the Upper Sacramento River Communities, we are grateful to OSPR and the people of the State to have been awarded this grant which will provide swift water oil response equipment and training to local personnel.  Siskiyou County is home of the head waters of the Sacramento River and its diverse habitat, we are very pleased to have these additional tools to help protect this crucial waterway.”

OSPR began offering equipment grants in 2007 and has since provided nearly $1 million to more than 40 local government agencies and tribes in California.

Equipment grants are available to any local public agency or tribe in the state. In order to be considered, agencies must be at risk of an oil spill occurring in their jurisdiction. The Response Equipment Grant Program webpage offers more information.

Media Contact:
Eric Laughlin, Public Information Officer, (916) 214-3279

State Offers Grants to Benefit Coastal Habitat

Media contact:
Carol Singleton, OSPR Information Officer, (916) 539-6124
Bruce Joab, OSPR Grant Coordinator, (916) 322-7561 

California’s oil spill agency is now seeking grant proposals for projects to enhance the state’s marine habitat. Coastal communities, nonprofit groups and environmental agencies are encouraged to apply.

The Department of Fish and Game’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR), the California Coastal Conservancy, and National Fish and Wildlife Federation together will select the recipients of grant money from the Environmental Enhancement Fund (EEF) for projects that will benefit California’s marine region. These funds come from penalties collected from oil spill violations in accordance with California’s Lempert-Keene-Seastrand Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act.

Up to $300,000 is available per year for qualifying projects. Multi-year projects are acceptable as long as no more than the annual spending authority is requested each year. Eligible organizations include nonprofits, cities, counties, districts, and state and federal agencies.

To qualify, an environmental enhancement project must acquire habitat for preservation or improve habitat quality and ecosystem function. In addition, it must meet all of the following requirements:

  • Be located within or immediately adjacent to California marine waters.
  • Have measurable outcomes within a predetermined timeframe.
  • Be designed to acquire, restore, or improve habitat or restore ecosystem function, or both, to benefit fish and wildlife.

The Environmental Enhancement Committee, which consists of the OSPR Administrator, the Executive Director of the California Coastal Conservancy and an officer from National Fish and Wildlife Federation, will select the projects to be funded.

Disbursement of the grants is contingent on the availability of funds in the EEF.

Grant applications must be received by 5 p.m. on Oct. 4, 2011. To contact the grant coordinator, email eefgrant@ospr.dfg.ca.gov. For more information, visit www.dfg.ca.gov/ospr/Science/eep.aspx.

United States and California File Civil Lawsuit Against Greka Oil and Gas, Inc., for Oil Spills in Santa Barbara County

Contact:
DOJ (202) 514-2007,  TDD (202) 514-1888, http://www.JUSTICE.GOV

DFG (916) 445-3153 or (916) 327-9948

WASHINGTON – The United States and the State of California have filed a civil complaint in federal court against Greka Oil & Gas, Inc. (now known as HVI Cat Canyon, Inc.) alleging that the company violated federal and state water laws. The plaintiffs include the Department of Justice, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (Central Coast Region), and the California Department of Fish and Game.

According to the complaint, filed in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, Greka illegally discharged crude oil and produced water from its oil and gas production facilities in Santa Barbara County during 21 spills between June 2005 and December 2010.  The spills resulted from ruptured storage tanks, corroded pipelines, and overflowing injection ponds. Oil from each of the spills flowed into nearby waterways.

The complaint also alleges that at 12 facilities, Greka failed to prepare plans and implement measures required by the Clean Water Act to prevent, contain, and respond to spills.

The lawsuit asks the court to order Greka to take all appropriate action to prevent future spills, and to fully implement the oil pollution prevention requirements of the Clean Water Act.  The United States and the State of California also seek civil penalties up to the maximum amount authorized by law.

In addition, the United States seeks the recovery of $2.4 million in costs incurred responding to and directing the cleanup of Greka’s spills.  The California Department of Fish and Game also seeks the recovery of its unpaid response costs and damages for harm caused to natural resources by the spills.
In May 2011, Greka changed its name to HVI Cat Canyon, Inc.  The company is a privately held Colorado corporation and a wholly owned subsidiary of Greka Integrated, Inc.