Tag Archives: North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve

There’s a Place for Wildlife on Your Tax Return

The deadline to file income tax returns is approaching. If you’re still working on yours, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) reminds you that you can help save endangered plants and animals on your state return. Near the end of form 540, look for the section called Voluntary Contributions. There, you can donate any dollar amount to the California Sea Otter Fund on line 410 or the Rare and Endangered Species Preservation Program on line 403.

The Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) is listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act, depleted under the Marine Mammal Protection Act and “fully protected” by the State of California. It is illegal to harass, pursue, hunt, catch, capture or kill, or attempt any of those actions on such listed species.

Donations to the California Sea Otter Fund are split between CDFW and the State Coastal Conservancy. CDFW’s half supports scientific research on the causes of mortality in sea otters, including a large analysis of 15 years of sea otter mortality data with critical support from the California Sea Otter Fund. CDFW scientists and their partners have also initiated a multi-agency outreach program called “Sea Otter Savvy” to educate coastal boaters, kayakers and the public about the impact of repeated human disturbance on sea otter health and survival. More information can be found at www.facebook.com/seaottersavvy.

The annual sea otter survey conducted in 2015 indicated that the population in California may be slowly increasing, to just over 3,000 animals. That is a small fraction of their historic numbers and this population is still vulnerable to oil spills, environmental pollution, predation by white sharks and other threats. You can help spread the word by liking and sharing the Sea Otter Fund Facebook page.

Since 1983, California taxpayers have voluntarily supported the Rare and Endangered Species Preservation Program by donating more than $21 million. That money has provided critical support for many state-listed species, including Butte County meadowfoam (Limnanthes floccose ssp. californica), Pacific fisher (Pekania pennanti), Shoshone pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis Shoshone), Scripps’s murrelet (Synthliboramphus scrippsi), Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog (Rana sierrae), and many-flowered navarretia (Navarretia leucocephala ssp. plieantha).

“From Death Valley National Park to North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve, many parts of California are exploding with amazing wildflower displays right now, but California’s native plants don’t usually get as much attention as animals,” said Jeb Bjerke, an environmental scientist with CDFW’s Native Plant Program. “Although many people think of California’s endangered species as animals, there are about twice as many listed plants. In addition, more than 1,000 plant species in California are rare but not listed. Our botanical diversity is astounding, and we are trying to protect that heritage from extinction.”

Voluntary contributions also help CDFW acquire federal matching funds, increasing the positive actions that can be done for rare, threatened and endangered species and the ecosystems that support them. Support from California taxpayers has enabled wildlife biologists to achieve important recovery milestones to conserve vulnerable species. Past contributors can take credit for helping the Peregrine falcon and California brown pelican enough to be removed from endangered species lists.

If someone else prepares your state tax return, please let him or her know you want to donate to the Rare and Endangered Species Preservation Program on line 403 or the California Sea Otter Fund on line 410. If you use Turbo Tax, when you’re near the end of your tax return it should ask if you want to make a voluntary contribution to a special fund. Click “Yes” and go to lines 403 and 410.

What you donate this year is tax deductible on next year’s return. More information on both the California Sea Otter Fund and the Rare and Endangered Species Preservation tax donation program is available on our Tax Donation webpage.

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Media Contacts:
Laird Henkel, Sea Otter Program, (831) 469-1726
Jeb Bjerke, Habitat Conservation Planning Branch (plants), (916) 651-6594
Esther Burkett, Nongame Wildlife Program, (916) 531-1594
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

Spring Wildflower Tours Return to Butte County

Media Contacts:
Bruce Forman, CDFW Interpretive Services, (916) 358-2353
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is offering residents an opportunity to enjoy beautiful vistas and wildflowers with naturalist-led walking tours at North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve.

Wildflower season generally begins in late February and goes into April. Depending on rainfall, wildflowers may be widespread in early May too.

Tours are offered in March and April on Saturdays and Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Each tour features a two and half mile hike over uneven terrain. Dogs are not allowed.

Up to 25 people may register for each timeslot. Online preregistration is required at www.wildlife.ca.gov/regions/2/wildflower-tours. Please visit the CDFW website for a full description.

Those unable to register online or needing more information can call CDFW Interpretive Services at (916) 358-2869 or email interpretiveservices@wildlife.ca.gov.

Be sure to mark your calendars for the Wildflower and Nature Festival at Riverbend Park in Oroville on Saturday, April 2, 2016. The many attractions include children’s activities, cooking demonstrations, food and music. Contact Feather River Recreation and Park District at (530) 533-2011 for more information.

 

CDFW Offers Walking Wildflower Tours in Butte County

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Media Contacts:
Bruce Forman, CDFW Interpretive Services, (916) 358-2353
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908
Public Contact: (916) 358-2869

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is offering naturalist-led wildflower tours this spring at North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve near Oroville.

Wildflower season usually begins slowly in late February and peaks in April.

The tour features a hike of a little more than two miles over uneven terrain, covering the area’s unique geology, beautiful vistas, wildflowers and vernal pools.

Two tours will be offered every Saturday in March and April at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Dogs are not allowed. Participants are encouraged to visit CDFW’s website for a full description (see link below). Each group is limited to 25 participants. Advance registration is required at http://www.dfg.ca.gov/regions/2/wildflowertours/.

If you are unable to register online or need more information, please call CDFW Interpretive Services at (916) 358-2869 or email interpretiveservices@wildlife.ca.gov.

The upcoming Wildflower and Nature Festival in Oroville will also highlight native plants. The annual festival will be Saturday April 4, 2015 at Riverbend Park in Oroville. For more information, contact the Feather River Recreation and Park District at (530) 533-2011.

DFG Offers Wildflower Tours of North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve

Media Contacts: 
Bruce Forman, DFG Interpretive Services, (916) 358-2353
Cristen Langner, DFG Communications, (916) 322-8907
 
Public Contact: (916) 358-2869
 
Join Department of Fish and Game (DFG) naturalists for a tour of North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve near Oroville this spring. Tour leaders and local field experts will point out and discuss the area’s unique geology, beautiful vistas, spectacular wildflower blooms, rare vernal pools and more! 

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North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve is open year-round from dawn to dusk. Hiking and bird watching are popular activities but the wildflower viewing can be stunning. Wildflower season generally begins in late February through March, with peak blooms in April. However, the season and intensity of wildflower booms can vary highly from year to year.
 
Two tours will be offered every Saturday in March and April, one at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Each tour is limited to 25 participants. Advance registration is required on the DFG website at www.dfg.ca.gov/lands/er/region2/northtable.html. These tours were extremely popular in 2011, so early registration is recommended. Additional information and photos can also be found on the website.
 
These two-hour tours cover up to two miles and involve moderate hiking over fields of uneven and rocky terrain, without established trails. Some small stream crossings and hill climbing may be required. Hikers should wear sturdy, closed-toed shoes and bring their own water and snacks, as neither are available onsite. Dogs are not allowed on these tours. Before you visit please review the Special Restrictions listed on the website.
 
The tours are free, but registrants are encouraged to make a donation online to the California Wildlife Foundation to support this program.
 
If you are unable to register online or need more information, please call DFG Interpretive Services at (916) 358-2869.

DFG to Hold Public Scoping Meetings on Proposed Trail at North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve

Media Contacts:
Bruce Forman, Interpretive Services, (916) 358-2353
Dana Michaels, DFG Communications, (916) 322-2420

Yellow-flowered meadow in front of green meadow, few trees and Mt. Lassen in the distance.
Table Mountain ER

The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) will host two meetings in Butte County to take public input on the future of North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve. DFG staff will provide an overview of a proposed trail at this ecological reserve and then give the public an opportunity to express their interests and concerns about it. Current and prospective users of the Reserve are both welcome.

The public meetings will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Nov. 21 at the Centennial Cultural Room, 1931 Arlin Rhine Memorial Drive in downtown Oroville and Tuesday, Nov. 22 at the Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 East 8th Street in Chico.

This Reserve, which now has no trails, is managed by DFG for the protection of native plants and animals, and for public use and appreciation. It includes annual grasslands, vernal pools, creeks, waterfalls, rocky outcrops and cliffs, and is currently open daily to the public, but has no trails.

The proposed trail will first undergo various surveys and analyses under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), planned for 2012. Those will be followed by a Notice of Determination that is expected to go out for public review during late summer 2012. DFG does not plan to close access to other sections of the Reserve.

For more information please contact Bruce Foreman at (916) 358-2353 or bforman@dfg.ca.gov.