Tag Archives: grants

CDFW to Host Public Meeting on Draft 2017 Fisheries Habitat Restoration Proposal Solicitation Notice

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Watershed Restoration Grants Branch will hold a public meeting to discuss its Draft Fisheries Habitat Restoration 2017 Proposal Solicitation Notice (FHR 2017 PSN). The Draft FHR 2017 PSN includes focuses for the Fisheries Restoration Grant Program, the Steelhead Report and Restoration Card Program, the Forest Land Anadromous Restoration Program and the Commercial Salmon Stamp Program.

The public meeting will be held Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, from 10 a.m. to noon, in the Natural Resources Building Auditorium, 1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento (95814). Interested parties may also participate via phone and online using AT&T Connect. See the meeting notice for instructions on how to participate remotely.

Written comments will be accepted by CDFW between Oct. 10 and Nov. 4, 2016.  All timely comments will be considered by staff prior to finalization of the solicitations. Comments may be submitted via email to FRGP@wildlife.ca.gov.

CDFW staff will accept oral and written comments during the public meeting and any comments received may become part of the public record.

For additional information, please contact Matt Wells at FRGP@wildlife.ca.gov or (916) 445-1285.

Persons with disabilities needing reasonable accommodation to participate in public meetings or other CDFW activities are invited to contact the Department’s Accessibility Coordinator Melissa Carlin at (916) 651-1214 or melissa.carlin@wildlife.ca.gov. Reasonable Accommodation requests for facility and/or meeting accessibility should be received at least 21 days prior to the event. Requests for American Sign Language Interpreters should be submitted at least two weeks prior to the event, and requests for Real-Time Captioning at least four weeks prior to the event.These timeframes are to help ensure that the requested accommodation is met. If a request for an accommodation has been submitted but due to circumstances is no longer needed, please contact the Accessibility Coordinator immediately.


Media contacts:
Matt Wells, CDFW Watershed Restoration Grants Branch, (916) 445-1285
Clark Blanchard, CDFW Education and Outreach, (916) 322-651-7824

Grant Funding Available for Angling Programs Geared to Hispanic Communities

Latinos are California’s largest ethnic population, with almost 15 million people of Hispanic heritage. Yet only a fraction of California’s nearly 1.8 million anglers are Hispanic, and according to a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study, Hispanic participation in fishing and angling activities has remained stagnant even as overall participation has increased nationwide. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF) are looking for new ways to educate and engage Hispanic communities in the sport of fishing, and this year, grants will be made available for programs, classes and activities that support this cause.

Grant funding will be made available through the George H.W. Bush Vamos A Pescar™ Education Fund, which supports the RBFF’s Hispanic initiative, Vamos A Pescar. The Education Fund allows state agencies to provide sub-grants to local 501(c)(3) organizations with project ideas that support efforts to keep future generations educated about the joys of fishing and boating and the importance of conservation. With the help of donations from companies and organizations, the Education Fund has continued to grow and expand nationally.

To be eligible for funding, proposals must:

  • Encourage family participation (both genders and multiple generations)
  • Appeal to participants who live in metropolitan communities
  • Be ethnically-inclusive (open to families of all races and ethnicities)

Proposals should also promote ethical angling practices and good stewardship toward California’s aquatic resources.

Interested 501 (c)(3) organizations should review the grant guidelines and complete the grant application form. Applications should be sent via email to clark.blanchard@wildlife.ca.gov no later than 5 p.m. on Oct. 31, 2016.

Proposals will be reviewed by CDFW staff and the RBFF advisory board. Grant recipients will be announced on Dec. 31, 2016.


Media Contact:
Clark Blanchard, CDFW Education and Outreach, (916) 651-7824

CDFW Awards $9.4 Million to Fund Additional Ecosystem and Watershed Restoration Projects

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) today announced the selection of five additional projects to receive approximately $9.4 million in grants through its fiscal year 2015-16 Watershed Restoration Grant Program cycle. These awards were made following an augmentation of funding from the Water Quality, Supply and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014 (Proposition 1) in the 2016-17 Budget Act.

The grants will fund a diversity of planning, implementation and acquisition projects that further implement the objectives of the California Water Action Plan.

“In the first year of our Proposition 1 program, the number of proposals received outstripped the availability of funding,” CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham said. “We are responding to this demand by readily supporting additional projects to address specific water action plan objectives which will ensure the program’s continued momentum.”

Projects approved for funding include:

  • American River Headwaters Restoration Project (up to $1.8 million to American River Conservancy)
  • Butte Creek Diversion 55 Fish Screen Project (up to $150,000 to Family Water Alliance, Inc.)
  • Johnson Meadow Acquisition, Upper Truckee River (up to $4 million to Tahoe Resource Conservation District)
  • Napa River Restoration Oakville to Oak Knoll Project (up to $800,000 to Napa County Department of Public Works)
  • Oroville Wildlife Area Floodplain Reconnection and Habitat Restoration Project (up to $2.6 million to River Partners)

These five awarded project proposals were included in the initial administrative review and subsequent technical review process of all proposals received in response to CDFW’s August 2015 solicitation. This process included reviews by CDFW scientists, as well as experts from other agencies and academia.

CDFW is also currently reviewing proposals received in response to its fiscal year 2016-17 Proposition 1 Grant Programs solicitation and anticipates the announcement of awarded projects in November 2016.

More information about CDFW’s Proposition 1 Restoration Grant Programs can be found at www.wildlife.ca.gov/grants. Funding for these projects comes from the Water Quality, Supply and Infrastructure Improvement Act 2014 (Proposition 1) bond funds, a portion of which are allocated annually through the California State Budget Act. For more information about Proposition 1, please visit http://bondaccountability.resources.ca.gov/p1.aspx.


Media Contacts:
Matt Wells, Watershed Restoration Grants Branch, (916) 445-1285
Clark Blanchard, CDFW Education and Outreach, (916) 651-7824


Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

At its Aug. 30 quarterly meet

Green iceplant and pampas grass invade southern California coastal wetlands between two roads.
Iceplant invades coastal wetlands at Ponto Beach near Encinitas. Photo courtesy of San Elijo Lagoon Conservancy

ing, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $15 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 21 funded projects will benefit fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide the public with access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, landowners and the local community. The state funds for all these projects come from initiatives approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources. Funded projects include:

  • A $135,000 grant to the Lake County Land Trust to acquire in fee approximately 34 acres of land for the protection of shoreline freshwater wetland, riparian woodland
    and wet meadow habitats that support the state-threatened Clear Lake hitch and the western pond turtle, a state species of special concern. This will also provide future wildlife-oriented public use opportunities in an area known as Big Valley, on the northwestern shore of Clear Lake in Lake County.
  • A $1.2 million grant to the Feather River Land Trust for a cooperative project with the Natural Resources Agency to acquire a conservation easement over approximately
    5,530 acres of land to provide protection for deer, mountain lion and oak habitats near the town of Doyle in Lassen County.
  • A $1.7 million acquisition in fee of approximately 1,066 acres of land by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) to expand the Crocker Meadows Wildlife Area, protect riparian and oak woodland habitat, and for future wildlife oriented public use opportunities near Beckwourth in Plumas County.
  • A $3 million grant to Sonoma County Agriculture Preservation and Open Space District for a cooperative project with the State Coastal Conservancy to acquire a conservation easement over approximately 871 acres of forest lands, including large areas of old and new growth redwood located near Stewarts Point in Sonoma County.
  • A $2.5 million grant to the San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust for a cooperative project with the Inland Empire Resource Conservation District to acquire in fee approximately 240 acres of land as an expansion of the Sawmill Pebble Plain Ecological Preserve – rare pebble plain habitat supporting a wide variety of endemic plant species – south of Big Bear Lake in the San Bernardino Mountains, in San Bernardino County.
  • An $850,000 grant to the San Elijo Lagoon Conservancy for a cooperative project to implement a comprehensive habitat restoration program, remove target nonnative invasive weed species and restore native habitat on 65 acres of coastal wetlands on several sites located at Agua Hedionda, Batiquitos Lagoon and San Elijo Lagoon. These are located from approximately nine miles north to five miles south of Encinitas on privately owned properties and on properties owned by CDFW and the Department of Parks and Recreation.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.


Oak woodland on hills behind a wide, open plain with scrub brush
Crocker Meadows Wildlife Area. CDFW photo
View from hillside high above the blue Pacific ocean behind green and brown pasture land.
View from Stewarts Point Ranch in Sonoma County. CDFW photo
A rare, pebble plain habitat with goldend-dry vegetation in front of a green oak forest.
Sawmill Pebble Plain Ecological Preserve. CDFW photo

Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Education and Outreach, (916) 322-2420

Sportsmen’s Dollars Support Research on Desert Bighorn Sheep

Thanks to California’s big game hunters, wildlife biologists studying Desert Bighorn Sheep will have new technology and tools to help them study deadly diseases that affect these icons of the desert.

In 2013, Desert Bighorn sheep populations in the Mojave Desert near Old Dad Peak suffered a die-off. In an effort to learn more about the spread of disease and survival, scientists from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), Mojave National Preserve and Oregon State University launched an ongoing joint study of adult sheep. They have captured and radio-collared about 150 adults to date, but important data about lamb mortality is still missing.

Now, in the third year of the study, a grant will enable researchers to collect the data that will unlock the mystery. Beginning this winter, scientists will capture and radio collar bighorn ewes. As they are captured, ultrasounds will be conducted, and ewes that are found to be pregnant will be implanted with special vaginal implant transmitters, the purchase of which will be funded by the $190,000 grant. When the lamb is subsequently born, the transmitter will be pushed out and send an alert signal. Project researchers can then go to the birth site and put a miniature radio transmitter on the lamb.

If the lamb subsequently dies, a mortality signal will be transmitted and the body will be recovered by researchers quickly enough to pinpoint the cause of death. This real-time information gathering technique will hopefully provide answers to the mystery behind unexplained bighorn mortality — why the 2013 disease outbreak was so widespread, what factors contributed to the spread of the disease and what management efforts can be instituted to help prevent future outbreaks.

Spearheaded by the nonprofit California Chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation and Oregon State University, the study will greatly benefit from the addition of the new technology, made possible by the purchase of big game tags by California hunters.  It is one of many project funded by the Big Game Grants Program, which allots about $800,000 each year to support studies such as this one.

Joint projects are particularly critical to fund, because they help target wildlife management issues which are often beyond the normal scope of CDFW manpower, expertise or financing.

“Funds in the Big Game Grants Program support a wide range of wildlife studies and projects,” said Craig Stowers, CDFW Big Game Program Manager. “We have a responsibility to see that the funding generated by hunters goes toward preserving wildlife populations. This sheep study is a great example of how hunters play a role in solving complicated and challenging research needs.”

This new phase of study is hoped to produce critical information unavailable until now.

“The desert environment is harsh and expansive. Until now, it’s been almost impossible to find and collect dead lambs in a timely manner, which is necessary in order to determine the cause of mortality,” said Daniella Dekelaita, a doctoral student and researcher at Oregon State University. “We know there have been significant lamb losses in some herds and this will give us accurate and timely information on what was the cause.”


Media Contacts:
Regina Abella, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-3728

Harry Morse, CDFW Communications, (208) 220-1169