Tag Archives: grant funding

CDFW Now Accepting Proposals for Proposition 1 Restoration Grant Programs

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is now accepting proposals for ecosystem restoration and protection projects that fulfill the objectives of Proposition 1.

For Fiscal Year (FY) 2017-2018, $31 million in Proposition 1 funds will be made available through CDFW’s two Proposition 1 Restoration Grant Programs. The Watershed Restoration Grant Program will fund up to $24 million in projects of statewide importance outside of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, while the Delta Water Quality and Ecosystem Restoration Grant Program will fund up to $7 million in projects that specifically benefit the Delta.

“We’re encouraged by the quality and scope of projects funded through Proposition 1 to date, and we look forward to another opportunity to fund new solutions to the greatest challenges facing California’s ecosystems,” said CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham. “This latest grant cycle expands our focus to more watersheds in critical need, in line with the objectives of Proposition 1 and a suite of strategic plans.”

The FY 2017-2018 Proposal Solicitation Notice, application instructions and other information about the Restoration Grant Programs are available at www.wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/watersheds/restoration-grants.

Proposals must be submitted online at https://soar.resources.ca.gov/. The deadline to apply is Friday, July 14, 2017 at 4 p.m.

Approved projects will contribute to the objectives of California Water Action Plan and State Wildlife Action Plan, the Delta Plan, California EcoRestore and the fulfillment of CDFW’s mission.

Approved by California voters in November 2014, Proposition 1 provides funds to implement the three broad objectives of the California Water Action Plan: establishing more reliable water supplies, restoring important species and habitat and creating a more resilient, sustainably managed water resources system (water supply, water quality, flood protection and environment) that can better withstand inevitable and unforeseen pressures in the coming decades.

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Media Contacts:
Matt Wells, CDFW Watershed Restoration Grants Branch, (916) 445-1285

Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 804-1714

CDFW to Host Prop. 1 Grant Workshops in Southern California

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will conduct four public workshops throughout Southern California for its Proposition 1 Restoration Grant Programs. CDFW is collaborating with the Wildlife Conservation Board, the Coastal Conservancy and several local conservancies to encourage a wide variety of project proposals within the region.

Each three-hour workshop will provide information about the various grants available and provide an opportunity for local stakeholders to ask questions. The San Diego and Calexico workshops will also include information specific to cross-border creek and watershed restoration opportunities.

The workshops will be held on the following dates:

Tuesday, Feb. 21
1-4 p.m.
San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board
2375 Northside Dr.
San Diego, CA  92108

Wednesday, Feb. 22 (CDFW will be the only agency presenting)
4-8 p.m.
Camarena Memorial Library
850 Encinas Ave.
Calexico, CA  92231

Thursday, Feb. 23
1-4 p.m.
Riverside County Administrative Center
4080 Lemon St., fifth floor, Conference Room D
Riverside, CA  92501

Friday, Feb. 24
10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
California State Parks Channel Coast District Office
911 San Pedro St.
Ventura, CA  93001-3744

To RSVP or if you have questions, please email watershedgrants@wildlife.ca.gov.

These projects are being conducted ahead of CDFW’s Fiscal Year 2017-2018 Proposition 1 Restoration Grant Program solicitation, anticipated for release in spring 2017. CDFW will also conduct a public meeting to introduce and discuss the draft version of this solicitation prior to its release. Please see CDFW’s Proposition 1 webpage for more grant program information.

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Media Contacts:
Matt Wells, Watershed Restoration Grants Branch, (916) 445-1285
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

CDFW to Host Public Meeting on Draft 2017 Fisheries Habitat Restoration Proposal Solicitation Notice

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Watershed Restoration Grants Branch will hold a public meeting to discuss its Draft Fisheries Habitat Restoration 2017 Proposal Solicitation Notice (FHR 2017 PSN). The Draft FHR 2017 PSN includes focuses for the Fisheries Restoration Grant Program, the Steelhead Report and Restoration Card Program, the Forest Land Anadromous Restoration Program and the Commercial Salmon Stamp Program.

The public meeting will be held Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, from 10 a.m. to noon, in the Natural Resources Building Auditorium, 1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento (95814). Interested parties may also participate via phone and online using AT&T Connect. See the meeting notice for instructions on how to participate remotely.

Written comments will be accepted by CDFW between Oct. 10 and Nov. 4, 2016.  All timely comments will be considered by staff prior to finalization of the solicitations. Comments may be submitted via email to FRGP@wildlife.ca.gov.

CDFW staff will accept oral and written comments during the public meeting and any comments received may become part of the public record.

For additional information, please contact Matt Wells at FRGP@wildlife.ca.gov or (916) 445-1285.

Persons with disabilities needing reasonable accommodation to participate in public meetings or other CDFW activities are invited to contact the Department’s Accessibility Coordinator Melissa Carlin at (916) 651-1214 or melissa.carlin@wildlife.ca.gov. Reasonable Accommodation requests for facility and/or meeting accessibility should be received at least 21 days prior to the event. Requests for American Sign Language Interpreters should be submitted at least two weeks prior to the event, and requests for Real-Time Captioning at least four weeks prior to the event.These timeframes are to help ensure that the requested accommodation is met. If a request for an accommodation has been submitted but due to circumstances is no longer needed, please contact the Accessibility Coordinator immediately.

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Media contacts:
Matt Wells, CDFW Watershed Restoration Grants Branch, (916) 445-1285
Clark Blanchard, CDFW Education and Outreach, (916) 322-651-7824

Sportsmen’s Dollars Support Research on Desert Bighorn Sheep

Thanks to California’s big game hunters, wildlife biologists studying Desert Bighorn Sheep will have new technology and tools to help them study deadly diseases that affect these icons of the desert.

In 2013, Desert Bighorn sheep populations in the Mojave Desert near Old Dad Peak suffered a die-off. In an effort to learn more about the spread of disease and survival, scientists from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), Mojave National Preserve and Oregon State University launched an ongoing joint study of adult sheep. They have captured and radio-collared about 150 adults to date, but important data about lamb mortality is still missing.

Now, in the third year of the study, a grant will enable researchers to collect the data that will unlock the mystery. Beginning this winter, scientists will capture and radio collar bighorn ewes. As they are captured, ultrasounds will be conducted, and ewes that are found to be pregnant will be implanted with special vaginal implant transmitters, the purchase of which will be funded by the $190,000 grant. When the lamb is subsequently born, the transmitter will be pushed out and send an alert signal. Project researchers can then go to the birth site and put a miniature radio transmitter on the lamb.

If the lamb subsequently dies, a mortality signal will be transmitted and the body will be recovered by researchers quickly enough to pinpoint the cause of death. This real-time information gathering technique will hopefully provide answers to the mystery behind unexplained bighorn mortality — why the 2013 disease outbreak was so widespread, what factors contributed to the spread of the disease and what management efforts can be instituted to help prevent future outbreaks.

Spearheaded by the nonprofit California Chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation and Oregon State University, the study will greatly benefit from the addition of the new technology, made possible by the purchase of big game tags by California hunters.  It is one of many project funded by the Big Game Grants Program, which allots about $800,000 each year to support studies such as this one.

Joint projects are particularly critical to fund, because they help target wildlife management issues which are often beyond the normal scope of CDFW manpower, expertise or financing.

“Funds in the Big Game Grants Program support a wide range of wildlife studies and projects,” said Craig Stowers, CDFW Big Game Program Manager. “We have a responsibility to see that the funding generated by hunters goes toward preserving wildlife populations. This sheep study is a great example of how hunters play a role in solving complicated and challenging research needs.”

This new phase of study is hoped to produce critical information unavailable until now.

“The desert environment is harsh and expansive. Until now, it’s been almost impossible to find and collect dead lambs in a timely manner, which is necessary in order to determine the cause of mortality,” said Daniella Dekelaita, a doctoral student and researcher at Oregon State University. “We know there have been significant lamb losses in some herds and this will give us accurate and timely information on what was the cause.”

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Media Contacts:
Regina Abella, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-3728

Harry Morse, CDFW Communications, (208) 220-1169

Big Game Grants Program Awards $1.1 Million for Wildlife

Hunters’ Dollars to Fund Big Game Conservation and Management Projects

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has awarded $1.1 million in grants for big game conservation projects in Fiscal Year 2016-2017.

The Big Game Grant Program (BGGP), which allocates funds generated by big-game hunters through the purchase of tags for sheep, bear, deer, pronghorn antelope and wild pig, identified 15 proposals for projects that will benefit big-game populations and the habitats upon which they depend.

“This year we are funding some exceptional studies that will broaden our knowledge and understanding of the unique needs of elk and sheep,” said Craig Stowers, CDFW’s Big Game Program Manager. “Other projects will help restore crucial habitat for deer and other wildlife, and provide water sources necessary for their survival. All of these proposals have been identified as an appropriate use of hunter dollars. Their funding goes directly to benefit and sustain the wildlife populations they hunt.”

The projects are selected and budget approved by a public advisory committee. Funded proposals must reflect the grantees’ dedication to big game conservation and management and meet a series of criteria, including increased hunting opportunity. Awards approved for 2016-2017 include:

  • Three grants totaling $277,000 to Oregon State University and the California chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation for several studies on the effects of pneumonia and respiratory disease in Desert Bighorn Sheep.
  • A $29,000 grant to the Society for the Conservation of Bighorn Sheep to develop water sources for wildlife on isolated parcels of land in the Mojave Desert.
  • A $205,000 grant to Humboldt State University to study Roosevelt elk populations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties.
  • Four grants totaling $127,000 to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to study elk populations in Modoc and Siskiyou counties.
  • A $27,000 grant to the Society for the Conservation of Bighorn Sheep to refill dried-up water guzzlers for wildlife in rural areas.
  • Two grants totaling $160,000 to the Mendocino County Blacktail Association to remove fir trees and improve forage and cover for deer in Mendocino, Glenn and Humboldt counties.
  • A $54,000 grant to CalFauna to conduct a prescribed burn in the Stanislaus National Forest and to document revegetation that will benefit wildlife.
  • An $81,000 grant to the Mule Deer Foundation to restore riparian meadows near Little Rattlesnake Creek in the Stanislaus National Forest.
  • A $150,000 grant to the California Deer Association to reconstruct and maintain watering devices for wildlife in the northern part of the state.

Grant monies awarded to the California chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation will allow the continuation of an ongoing study of the spread and consequences of respiratory disease for bighorn sheep in the eastern Mojave Desert. In addition to conserving and enhancing wild sheep populations, the nonprofit is committed to educating the public about sustainable use and the conservation benefits of hunting.

“We could not have funded this three-year sheep study without the support from the Big Game Management Account,” said Kyle Meintzer, an avid outdoorsman and bow hunter who serves on the Board of Directors for the Wild Sheep Foundation. “The BGGP shows the importance and value of hunters and the dollars their licenses and tags provide for wildlife management and conservation.”

The Big Game Management Account and BGGP were created by the California Legislature in 2010 (currently Fish and Game Code, section 3953). Since the inception of the BGGP, more than $5 million has gone to such projects. More information about the BGGP can be found at www.wildlife.ca.gov/grants/big-game.

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Media Contacts:
Craig Stowers, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-3553
Harry Morse, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8911