Tag Archives: environmental science

California Fish and Game Celebrates 100th Anniversary

cover page of the plant issue features orange and blue flowers in a green field
The first of four centennial issues of California Fish and Game focuses on plants.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has published the highly respected scientific journal California Fish and Game continuously for an entire century. To commemorate the anniversary, CDFW is creating four special issues this year.

Promoting “Conservation Through Education,” California Fish and Game is an internationally recognized research publication read primarily by scientists in the fields of conservation, ecology and natural resource management. It focuses on the wildlife of North America’s west coast (primarily California) and the eastern North Pacific Ocean, but occasionally includes material from elsewhere.

For the first time ever, the quarterly journal is devoting an issue entirely to California’s native plants. This is the first of the four special 2014 issues that will focus on different areas of conservation by CDFW scientists and collaborators from other organizations, including the California Native Plant Society (CNPS).

The idea for an all-plants issue arose during a conversation between CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham and CNPS Executive Director Dan Gluesenkamp about CDFW’s desire for the 100th anniversary issues to be special. The plant issue (Vol. 100, Issue 1) includes the description of a newly discovered species of plant, Silene krantzii, endemic to the San Bernardino Mountains.

“I’m proud to have been the editor of this important scientific journal for the past four years and to bring it to its centennial issue,” said Dr. Vern Bleich. “I believe it highlights the important work that we’re doing as a conservation agency.”

The plant issue features an introduction by Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr., and a co-authored introduction by Bonham and Gluesenkamp. The other three 100th Anniversary issues will focus on marine life, ecology of freshwater organisms and terrestrial wildlife. They, too, will be introduced by prominent Californians who support the conservation of our native flora and fauna. Volume 100(1) is available online, free of charge, at www.dfg.ca.gov/publications/journal.

Media Contacts:
Dr. Vern Bleich, California Fish and Game Editor, (916) 322-8911
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

There’s Still Time to Help Endangered Species on Your Tax Return!

Media Contacts:
Laird  Henkel, Sea Otter Program, (831) 469-1726
Esther Burkett, Nongame Wildlife Program, (916) 531-1594
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

a sea otter in greenish waters off California
Sea otter in California waters. CDFW photo
red fox pounces on something beneath the snow
Sierra Nevada red fox, in Sonora County. CDFW photo
bright orange, trumpet-shaped flowers on a green-stemmed shrub
Large-flowered fiddleneck. Susan Cochrane/CDFW photo
A California condor spreads its wings while standing atop a post
California condor at Pinnacles National Monument. Carie Battistone/CDFW photo
Desert tortoise on dry, rocky desert floor
Desert tortoise in southern California. Rebecca Barboza/CDFW photo
two yellow-legged frogs at the edge of a bubbling stream
Mountain yellow-legged frogs. CDFW photo
a flock of sandhill cranes feeding in wetland, all colored a pinkish-coral by sunrise
Greater sandhill cranes in central California. Bob Burkett photo
yellow flower on green stalk with green leaves on sandy Lake Tahoe beach
Tahoe Yellow Cress. © Aaron E. Sims and CNPS

A popular 1970s bumper sticker said, “Support wildlife…Throw a party!” Now you can support wildlife and throw a party. Just make a voluntary contribution on your California income tax return!  The April 15 due date for income tax returns is nearing, but if you haven’t filed yours yet, it’s not too late to use it to help wildlife.

By donating any whole dollar amount to the California Sea Otter Fund on line 410 of your tax return, you will help pay for research by scientists at the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). They are studying premature deaths within our sea otter population and finding that there are many contributing factors, some of which are man-made. With enough funding, they should be able to determine the primary causes, then work to develop solutions that will allow the sea otter population to grow at the rate it should.

Another 80 species of animals and more than 200 plants are listed by the state as rare, threatened or endangered. Donations to the Rare and Endangered Species Preservation Fund on line 403 of your income tax form pay for essential CDFW research and recovery efforts for these plants and animals, and critical efforts to restore and conserve their habitat.

“We work with other organizations, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, UC and Cal State Universities, California’s state and national parks, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, and many other organizations to stretch the donations as far as we can,” said CDFW Wildlife Biologist Esther Burkett. “In the Rare and Endangered Species Programs, we’ve leveraged those donations to receive federal matching funds so we can do even more for wildlife.”

If someone else prepares your state tax return, please tell him or her you want to contribute to the California Sea Otter Fund on line 410 and/or the Rare and Endangered Species Protection Program on line 403. If you use Turbo Tax, when you’re near the end of your tax return it should ask if you want to make a voluntary contribution to a special fund. Click “Yes” and go to lines 403 and 410.

These funds consist entirely of voluntary contributions from California taxpayers. There are no other dedicated state funding sources available for this important work. Please visit the website at www.dfg.ca.gov/taxcheck and Facebook page at www.facebook.com/SeaOtterFundCDFW for more information.

CDFW Team Investigates Major Trinity County Marijuana Cultivation Sites

Sept. 6, 2013
Media Contact:
Warden Mark Michilizzi, CDFW Enforcement, (916) 651-2084

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The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) participated in a multiagency narcotics task force that executed 23 search warrants in Trinity County on Aug. 29. All of the warrants were served in the Trinity Pines subdivision in the town of Hayfork.

The parcels were part of a long investigation conducted by the State Marijuana Investigation Team, Bureau of Land Management and Trinity County Narcotics Task Force, relating to illegal cultivation of marijuana for sale. Eight wildlife officers and six CDFW environmental scientists inspected nine of the 23 parcels for environmental crimes.

Violations found by the CDFW team include eight unlawful water diversions, 18 incidents of state water pollution, five violations of littering state waters, and multiple violations of the Clean Water Act and Porter Cologne Water Quality Act.

Some environmental violations involved the terracing of slopes above fish streams and other unpermitted construction that negatively impact stream banks, water quality and riparian zones through loss of natural habitat and uncontrolled water runoff. Large quantities of trash and plastic fertilizer bags were discarded throughout the parcels, creating environmental and wildlife hazards.

“What we observed on these parcels contributes to the cumulative impacts we see downstream including low stream flows, nutrient loading causing algae blooms, poor water quality and ultimately fish kills,” said CDFW Environmental Scientist Jane Arnold, who has been working environmental crime investigations associated with illegal marijuana growing operations for several years. “These stream impacts are undermining decades of restoration and fish recovery efforts in the Trinity River watershed, and ultimately affect its wild and scenic character.”

CDFW’s Lt. Jackie Krug added that wardens and environmental scientists have been working together closely for several years to investigate environmental crimes associated with illegal marijuana growing operations. “This detail resulted in similar types of environmental crimes that we often see on these sites,” she said.

DFG Launches Science Institute to Showcase Decades of Scientific Work and Support its Scientific Future

Media Contacts:
Jordan Traverso, DFG Deputy Director, (916) 654-9937

The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) publicly announced the first phase of its new Science Institute, available for viewing at www.dfg.ca.gov/Science.

“This website is the first part of a multi-phase approach intended to highlight the exceptional work that DFG scientists have been doing for many, many years and support our scientific future,” said Charlton H. Bonham, Director of DFG. “Our goal is that this Institute will help develop our current scientists professionally, by increasing skills, resources, collaboration and notoriety, as well as attract new scientists to help us plan for the years ahead.”

The website launch is phase one of the Institute. Future phases will include an archive of scientific presentations, professional development tools, better access for DFG scientists to outside science and scientific literature, a science symposium and much more.

Director Bonham prepared a video message for this website launch which can be viewed at http://youtu.be/S2Injj4sWx8.