Tag Archives: deer

CDFW to Offer Deer Hunting Clinic in San Bernardino County

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Advanced Hunter Education Program, the Hunter Education Instructor Association of Southern California and the California Deer Association will jointly sponsor a deer hunting clinic on Saturday, April 11. The clinic will be held at the Apple Valley Gun Club in Victorville in San Bernardino County.

The clinic is designed for Southern California deer hunters of all skill levels. The clinic will cover deer biology, hunting techniques and regulations, methods for locating deer, locations to hunt, field dressing and care of game.

The clinic is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $45. Youths 17 years and younger are free, but must be accompanied by adult.

Space is limited and participants must register in advance here. After registering, participants will receive an email with a map to the facility and a list of items to bring. CDFW’s Advanced Hunter Education Program will provide all necessary class equipment.

Victorville is located approximately 60 miles north of Los Angeles.

Media Contacts:
Lt. Alan Gregory, CDFW Advanced Hunter Education Program, (209) 329-7426

Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

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Persons with disabilities needing reasonable accommodation to participate in public meetings or other CDFW activities are invited to contact the Department’s Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator Melissa Carlin at (916) 651-1214 or Melissa.Carlin@wildlife.ca.gov. Reasonable Accommodation requests for facility and/or meeting accessibility should be received at least 21 days prior to the event. Requests for American Sign Language Interpreters should be submitted at least two weeks prior to the event, and requests for Real-Time Captioning at least four weeks prior to the event. These timeframes are to help ensure that the requested accommodation is met. If a request for an accommodation has been submitted but due to circumstances is no longer needed, please contact the Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator immediately.

Inyo County Man Arrested, Charged with Poaching Deer

Media Contacts:
Lt. Bill Dailey, CDFW Law Enforcement Division, (661) 203-6380
Lt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement Division, (916) 508-7095

dog
Tracking dog Sieger helped wildlife officers locate a poached trophy deer.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) officers arrested a poacher today in Inyo County for allegedly illegally killing a trophy 3×3 deer in the G-3 zone. Joseph Eugene Bragdon, 37, of Bishop was taken into custody without incident at his workplace after a $15,000 arrest warrant was issued by the Inyo County District Attorney’s Office.

“We are grateful to the Inyo County DA’s Office for recognizing the importance of resource protection and that wildlife poaching is a serious crime,” said Lt. Bill Dailey of CDFW’s Law Enforcement Division. “Ethical hunters prize the G-3 tag for the incredible landscape and quantity of large deer. With only 35 tags issued every year, hunters can apply for years and never draw this zone.”

CDFW wildlife officers received a tip, through the CalTIP hotline, that on Nov. 1 Bragdon took his juvenile son to Division Creek in the trophy G-3 hunting zone and killed a large mule deer buck using a D-7 deer zone tag. With the assistance of the investigating warden’s tracking dog, Sieger, they located a dead deer with only the antlers and part of the edible meat removed. Most of the animal was left to waste.

Poaching a deer, cutting the head off and wasting edible meat is illegal and an egregious violation of ethical hunting standards. Wildlife officers took DNA samples and seized ballistic evidence.

The G-3 deer season runs only from Dec. 6-21. This area is considered a trophy deer hunt when high country mule deer bucks enter the area to escape the high country winter storms.

In November 2012, Bragdon was convicted of two misdemeanor hunting violations in Nevada, including hunting big game in a closed season and hunting big game without a tag. He was fined and had demerit points added to his Nevada hunting license.

Bragdon faces possible charges for several violations of the Fish and Game Code, including taking a deer without a license, tag or permit, failure to fill out tags, waste of game, failure to have a tag in possession and possession of less than an ounce of marijuana. If convicted, Bragdon could face revocation of his hunting license, fines, probation and/or jail time.

CalTIP (Californians Turn In Poachers and Polluters) is a confidential secret witness program that encourages the public to provide CDFW with factual information leading to the arrest of poachers and polluters. Ethical hunters and anglers are the most common contributors to the CalTIP hotline. The toll-free hotline number is (888) 334-2258.

Tracking dog Sieger is a candidate for the next cycle of certification training for CDFW’s exceptional team of Warden K-9s.

Caltrans, Fish and Wildlife to Drivers: Watch out for Wildlife

Caltrans and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) are cautioning motorists of an unusually high number of collisions between drivers and wildlife on mountain highways this autumn. The increase has been particularly notable on Interstate 80 and U.S. Highway 50 in Placer and El Dorado counties.

“There were an unprecedented 23 incidents involving large animals on Highway 50 and I-80 in just six days from Nov. 14-19,” said Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty. “Drivers need to use caution and watch out for wildlife as they travel through the Sierras and other rural areas.”

“Motorists need to be on the lookout for animals on or near roadways, particularly deer and bears,” said CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham. “It’s not only dangerous for the animals, but drivers and their passengers can be injured or killed if they hit – or swerve to miss – an animal.”

Caltrans and CDFW offer a few tips for motorists:

Be particularly alert when driving in areas frequented by wildlife and give yourself more time than usual to react safely by reducing your speed.

  • “Sweep” the roadway from side to side with your eyes as you drive. This increases your chance of seeing anything that might become a hazard.
  • Pay particular attention when driving during morning and evening, as wildlife are most active during these times.
  • If you see an animal cross the road, know that another may be following it.
  • Don’t litter. Odors from all kinds of products may entice animals to venture near roadways.

There are probably several factors behind the animals’ increased movements near highways. One is the deer rut, or mating season, and bucks are always more active this time of year. Recent wildfires in the mountains and foothills also destroyed a considerable amount of vegetation, forcing wildlife to travel farther than usual to forage. The drought has stressed existing vegetation, likely reducing its normal nutritional value and forcing animals to eat more than usual. Bears are getting ready for hibernation and are foraging far and wide to get enough nutrition to make it through the winter.

“Wildlife corridors” constructed under some highways have helped reduce wildlife-related incidents. Caltrans recently completed construction of a wildlife crossing on State Highway 89 in Sierra County and has two others planned for construction next season. The district also built a wildlife crossing on Highway 50 and has a project programmed for next season to study wildlife activity near state highways.

In addition, Caltrans has wildlife warning signs posted in key areas along its state highway system and will be installing more with help from CDFW and other partner agencies. Caltrans will also be using its electronic message boards to alert motorists of increased wildlife activity.

Caltrans District 3 is responsible for maintaining and operating 4,385 lane miles in 11 Sacramento Valley and Northern Sierra counties. CDFW’s North Central Region is responsible for managing California’s diverse fish, wildlife and plant resources across 17 counties.

Please visit the Living with Wildlife web page at www.wildlife.ca.gov/Living-with-Wildlife for more information and to report a wildlife incident or dead or injured wildlife.

Media Contacts:
Steve Nelson, Caltrans, (530) 741-4566

Dana Michaels, CDFW, (916) 322-2420

Caltrans and the Department of Fish and Wildlife Urge Motorists to Be Alert During Watch Out for Wildlife Week

Caltrans and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) remind motorists to remain alert for wildlife near roadways during Watch Out for Wildlife Week (WOW), which runs September 15-21.

“It’s important that motorists, when driving through areas frequented by deer, elk and other animals, be alert to protect themselves as well as California’s wildlife,” said Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty.

Defenders of Wildlife (Defenders), a national nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting native species and their natural communities, reports more than 200 people are killed nationally in collisions with deer, elk and other large mammals each year with an estimated 1.5 million animals hit annually.

The Watch Out for Wildlife campaign is supported by Caltrans, CDFW, Defenders and the Road Ecology Center at the University of California, Davis.

“It’s a shame that many animals and people are injured and killed on our roads every year,” said Craig Stowers, CDFW’s Game Program Manager. “Many injuries, deaths and costly vehicle repairs can be avoided if drivers would pay more attention when animals are most active, and be prepared to react safely if an animal moves onto the road.”

Caltrans, CDFW and Defenders offer a few tips for motorists:

  • Be particularly alert when driving in areas frequented by wildlife and give yourself more time to react safely by reducing your speed.
  • Pay particular attention when driving during morning and evening, as wildlife are most active during these times.
  • If you see an animal cross the road, know that another may be following.
  • Don’t litter. The odors may entice animals to venture near roadways.

Here are a few examples of what Caltrans, CDFW and their partners are doing to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions:

a beautiful golden bob cat walking out from a highway underpass
A bobcat that just crossed safely under State Route 76 in San Diego County. Caltrans photo
two coyotes walk into concrete underpass to reach other side of a highway
Coyotes safely cross under SR 76 in San Diego County. Caltrans photo

Liberty Canyon Wildlife Crossing, Los Angeles County
Caltrans has applied for $2 million in federal funding for the environmental and engineering design phases of a future wildlife crossing over U.S. Highway 101 at Liberty Canyon Road in Agoura Hills. In the interim, Caltrans is providing wildlife fencing in Liberty Canyon to prevent wildlife mortalities along the freeway until a permanent structure can be built. The highway presents an impassible barrier for wildlife migrating into or out of the Santa Monica Mountains.  A new wildlife crossing promises to provide an improved habitat connection that will sustain and improve the genetic diversity of wildlife in the area.

State Route 76, San Diego County
Five wildlife crossings and directional fencing were installed as part of the SR-76 Melrose to Mission Highway Improvement Project in 2012. A wildlife movement study, including road kill surveys, camera station surveys and tracking transect surveys, is underway to determine the effectiveness of the crossings and fencing. A review of the data collected to date suggests the combination of directional fencing and wildlife crossings may be limiting vehicle-wildlife collisions and allowing for wildlife movement across SR-76. Medium-to-large species using the wildlife crossings include the badger, bobcat, coyote, raccoon, striped skunk, desert cottontail and opossum.

State Route 17, Santa Cruz
Caltrans has built wildlife undercrossings to accommodate wildlife on several highways in the Bay Area and is currently working with the Land Trust of Santa Cruz County to build a new wildlife undercrossing at the Laurel Curve on State Route 17. Since 2007, motorists have hit 14 mountain lions along this section of the highway in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The Land Trust is working to raise $5 million to purchase land on either side of the Laurel Curve, which would make it possible for Caltrans to proceed with building the undercrossing.

Central Coast
Caltrans is seeking $1.8 million in federal funding to finance wildlife corridor projects in Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz and Santa Clara counties where local wildlife exists in close proximity to state highways. If the request is approved, Caltrans will obtain an additional $2.5 million in state funding to finance all aspects of the projects. Caltrans assembled an extensive list of stakeholders and partners for this proposal, including the California State Coastal Conservancy, the Nature Conservancy, UC Davis, the Elkhorn Slough Foundation, the Pinnacles National Monument and the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County.

Caltrans has installed new wildlife fencing and electric mats at unfenced intersections along U.S. Highway 101 near San Luis Obispo, which bisects a major wildlife corridor in the Los Padres National Forest.

Media Contacts:
Mark Dinger, Caltrans Public Affairs, 916-657-5060
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, 916-322-2420

Big Game Drawing Deadline Approaches

A buck (male deer) in California foothills
A California buck

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is reminding hunters that the deadline to apply for the 2014 Big Game Drawing is just weeks away. Sales transactions must be completed before midnight on June 2, 2014. Applications for elk, antelope, bighorn sheep, premium deer tags and fundraising drawing tags may be submitted at any CDFW license agent, CDFW license sales office, by telephone sales or online.

All hunt tags for premium deer, elk, antelope and bighorn sheep are awarded through CDFW’s Big Game Drawing. Successful applicants will receive a receipt to show their hunt choices have been entered in the drawing. CDFW expects the drawing results to be available online in mid-June. Hunters may also contact a CDFW license sales office to check the results.

The following resources are available to assist hunters:

  • Proposed seasons, tag drawing application instructions and drawing statistics can be found in the 2014 California Big Game Hunting Digest. The book is available at www.dfg.ca.gov/publications/digest/.
  • To find a license agent near you or to purchase items online, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/licensing/ols.
  • To submit drawing applications by telephone, please contact the license sales line at (800) 565-1458.

Fund-raising Drawing Opportunities

CDFW’s random drawing fund-raising program includes tags for deer, elk and pronghorn antelope. This year the program will not include a bighorn sheep tag drawing. The drawings for deer, elk and antelope are open to any resident or nonresident 12 years of age or older as of July 1, 2014. The cost to enter the drawings is $5.97 per entry, per hunt. Applicants do not need a valid hunting license to apply, and may apply for the drawings as many times as they wish by June 2, 2014. Winners will be required to purchase an annual hunting license. However, the tag will be issued at no additional cost.

Open Zone Deer Tag

An Open Zone deer tag allows the hunter to hunt during the authorized season dates of any hunt, using the specific method and meeting any special conditions of the tag for that hunt.

Multiple Zone Elk Tag

The fund-raising random drawing elk tag allows the hunter to hunt in any of the following zones: Northwestern, Northeastern, Marble Mountains, Siskiyou and La Panza. Hunters may use any legal method of take. All three subspecies of elk may be hunted, although only one elk may be harvested. The hunt dates open one week prior to the earliest season in that zone and run through the end of the regular season.

Northeastern California Pronghorn Antelope Tag

The fund-raising random drawing antelope tag allows the hunter to hunt in any of the Northeastern antelope zones (Mount Dome, Clear Lake, Likely Tables, Lassen, Big Valley and Surprise Valley) with any legal method. The hunt dates are from Aug. 2 to Sept. 21, 2014.

Media Contacts:
Lai Saechao, CDFW License and Revenue Branch, (916) 928-7416
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

DFG Partners with California Waterfowl Association to Offer SHARE Hunts

Through a unique partnership with landowners, The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) is opening up additional hunting opportunities on private lands previously closed to the public.

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DFG and the California Waterfowl Association (CWA) are offering hunting opportunities through the Shared Habitat Alliance for Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) program.

DFG was awarded a grant through the Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program (VPA-HIP) in 2011. The grant is designed to assist states and tribal governments by encouraging owners and operators of privately held farm, ranch, and forest land to make that land available for public access to hunting.

Beginning this month DFG and CWA will institute a three-year effort allowing hunters of all ages the ability to hunt on lands otherwise unavailable for public use. These opportunities are offered through CWA’s Hunt Program and will increase land owner participation in offering public hunter access.

Through the partnership 70 individual landowners who collectively own more than 50,000 acres have allowed access to their respective properties for hunting opportunities. More than 400 hunters will be able to hunt on lands for waterfowl, pheasant, dove, turkey, and wild pigs. In addition to providing hunts to the general hunting public, the program will host specialty hunts that cater to all hunters. Hunt locations range from the Klamath Basin to southern California.

Please visit http://www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/share or http://www.calwaterfowl.org for more information.

Contacts:
Victoria Barr, DFG Shared Habitat Alliance for Recreational Enhancement Program Coordinator (916) 445-4034
Jeff Smith, California Waterfowl Association Hunt Program Coordinator, (530) 305-9234
Kyle Orr, DFG Communications, (916) 322-8958

Two Menlo Park Men Arrested for Spotlighting Deer

Media Contact:
Patrick Foy, DFG Law Enforcement Division, (916) 651-2084

California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) wardens have arrested two Menlo Park men on poaching charges for shooting a deer after temporarily blinding it with a light.

In the early morning hours of Sep. 16, Warden-Pilot Gavin Woelfel was flying a DFG aircraft looking for poachers with a night vision device. He noticed two men driving slowly down a remote US Forest Service (USFS) road in the darkness while shining a light out the windows of their truck. They appeared to be spotlighting, which is when poachers shine a light into deers eyes at night. The bright light causes the deer to freeze, making it an easy shot.

From his airplane, Warden Woelfel watched two men exit the vehicle and one fire his rifle at an object off the side of the road. The man then walked off the road and fired his rifle a second time before returning to his vehicle and driving off.

Warden Woelfel monitored the vehicle as it drove back to the Dry Oak Campground in the Mendocino National Forest. Wardens Michael Pascoe, Patrick Freeling and Timothy Little, along with USFS Law Enforcement Officer Christopher Magallon, were called to the scene. When they arrived at 3:25 a.m., they located the suspects pickup and made contact with its occupants, including driver Cecundino Angel, 50, his son, Rogelio Angel Quevedo, 21, and another juvenile son. The cab of the pickup was found to contain two rifles, one pistol and a large flashlight.

Meanwhile, DFG Lt. Loren Freeman responded to the site of the shooting, where he located a freshly killed doe.

Both of the older suspects ultimately admitted to spotlighting deer and Angel admitted to killing the doe. One of the rifles in Angel’s possession was found to be stolen out of Washington.

Angel was arrested and booked into Mendocino County jail on charges of possession of a stolen firearm, spotlighting, shooting big game at night and waste of game. USFS Officer Magallon also issued Angel a citation for littering, an unsafe campfire and other assorted federal violations.

The older son, Quevedo, was cited for spotlighting and shooting big game at night.

DFG Offers First SHARE Program Deer Hunt in Merced County

Contacts:
Cristen Langner, Merced Unit Biologist, 209-723-3170
Victoria Barr, SHARE Program Coordinator, 916-445-4034

Media Contact:
Janice Mackey, DFG Communication, 916-322-8908

The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) is announcing a deer hunt with the Shared Habitat Alliance for Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) program in Merced County.

Located along the Merced River near Snelling, the Little Hills Ranch will be available for D-6 deer hunts on the following dates:

  • August 24-26 and September 7-9 – Archery only
  • September 14-16 and October 19-21 – General methods of take

During these hunt periods, hunters will be able to fill a wild pig tag in addition to their deer tag.

To apply for these hunts please go to: http://www.dfg.ca.gov/licensing/ols/

Hunters with valid D6 tags may apply through the Automated License Data System (ALDS) starting July 26. A $10.00 non-refundable application fee will be charged for each hunt choice. Applicants may apply for multiple hunt periods but will only be drawn for one period per property.

Each access pass is good for one party of two people and can be either two hunters or one hunter and a non-hunting companion.  Pig hunting is allowed during each period but hunters taking pigs during the “archery only” periods are restricted to using archery equipment.

The SHARE program is designed to provide the public with access to private or landlocked public lands. Participating landowners are compensated for providing access to or through their land for hunting, fishing, or other recreational uses of wildlife. Application fees will be used to help expand the SHARE program.

For more information about the Little Hills Ranch hunts or the SHARE program please go to: http://www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/share/

DFG Offers Apprentice Deer Hunt on Carrizo Plain Ecological Reserve

Contacts:
Robert Stafford, DFG Associate Wildlife Biologist, (805) 528-8670
Rocky Thompson, DFG Senior Wildlife Biologist, (805) 594-6175

Media Contact:
Janice Mackey, DFG Communications, (916) 322-8908

The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) is offering a drawing for an apprentice deer hunt on the Chimineas Unit of the Carrizo Plain Ecological Reserve.

Three hunters between ages 12 and 15 will be chosen through a lottery and allowed to hunt on the weekend of September 15 and 16. In addition, the selected participants may also show up on Friday, September 14 for a barbecue and hunter education refresher course that will cover gun safety, deer hunting and game care.

The drawing is being held in cooperation with the California Deer Association (CDA).

To apply, applicants must submit a postcard with the hunter’s name, address, telephone number and 2012-2013 Junior Hunting License number to:

Chimineas Apprentice Deer Hunt
Department of Fish and Game
3196 South Higuera Street, Suite A
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Applications must be received in the office by 5 p.m. on July 27. Late or incomplete applications will not be entered in the lottery. Successful applicants will be notified by phone and will receive additional information, including maps and special regulations prior to the hunt.

Selected hunters must be accompanied by an adult and possess a valid Junior Hunting License and zone A tag. Hunts will be led by CDA volunteers. Overnight lodging is available at the main ranch house on the ecological reserve. CDA will provide breakfast, lunch and dinner on Saturday, as well as breakfast and lunch on Sunday.

About the Carrizo Plain Ecological Reserve

The Chimineas Unit of the Carrizo Plain Ecological Reserve is located in southeastern San Luis Obispo County. It is a 30,000-acre property owned by DFG that provides habitat for deer, tule elk, pronghorn antelope and a host of other species.

Hunting Licenses, Big Game Drawing Applications Now Available

Media Contacts:
Maria Melchiorre, DFG License and Revenue Branch, (916) 928-6881
Brad Burkholder, DFG Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-1829
Kirsten Macintyre, DFG Communications, (916) 322-8988

Hunters can now purchase 2012-2013 hunting licenses and apply for the Big Game Drawing online, the Department of Fish and Game (DFG) announced. Transactions can be conducted at any DFG license sales office, license agent or online.

All premium deer hunt tags, and elk, antelope and bighorn sheep tags are awarded through the DFG Big Game Drawing. To qualify for the Big Game Drawing, the sales transaction must be completed before midnight on June 2, 2012. When the transaction is complete, the customer will receive a receipt to show their hunt choices have been entered in the drawing. Mail-in applications will not be accepted. Beginning June 22, hunters can contact a DFG license sales office or look online to check the results.

To find a license agent near you or to purchase items online, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/licensing. To learn more about the Big Game Drawing application process, please view the 2012 California Hunting Digest (2012 Big Game) at www.dfg.ca.gov/publications/digest/.

Additional Drawing Opportunities

DFG has expanded the random draw fund-raising program initiated in 2011 through its Automated License Data System. Last year, chances for a deer tag and an elk tag were offered to the public and those two opportunities alone generated more than $130,000 for conservation.

For 2012, there are four tags available through fund-raising random drawings. In addition to the deer tag and elk tag offered last year, a pronghorn antelope tag and a bighorn sheep tag are available. The drawings for deer, elk and antelope are open to anyone 12 years of age or older as of July 1, 2012. The sheep drawing is open to anyone 16 years of age or older as of July 1, 2012. The cost to enter the drawings is $5.66 per entry, per hunt. Applicants do not need a valid hunting license to apply, and may apply for the drawings as many times as they wish by June 2, 2012. Winners will be required to purchase an annual hunting license. However, the tag will be issued at no additional cost.

Kelso/Old Dad Mountains Bighorn Sheep Tag

DFG has added one Kelso/Old Dad Mountains Bighorn Sheep tag to the Fund-raising Random Drawing. The Fund-raising Random Drawing sheep tag allows the hunter to hunt in the Kelso/Old Dad Mountains zone with any legal method. The hunt dates are from Nov. 3, 2012 to Feb. 3, 2013.

As an added bonus for the hunter who draws the sheep tag from that random drawing, a private entity, San Gorgonio Wilderness Outfitters, has offered free guide services to the recipient of the tag for the Kelso Peak/Old Dad Mountains zone.

Northeastern California Pronghorn Antelope Tag

DFG has added one Northeastern California Pronghorn antelope tag to the Fund-raising Random Drawing. The Fund-raising Random Drawing antelope tag allows the hunter to hunt in any of the Northeastern antelope zones (Mount Dome, Clear Lake, Likely Tables, Lassen, Big Valley and Surprise Valley) with any legal method. The hunt dates are July 28 through Sept. 16, 2012.

Open Zone Deer Tag

An Open Zone deer tag allows the hunter to hunt during the authorized season dates of any hunt, using the specific method and meeting any special conditions of the tag for that hunt.

Owens Valley Elk Tag

The Fund-raising Random Drawing tule elk tag allows the hunter to hunt in any of the Owens Valley zones (Bishop, Tinemaha Mountain, Tinemaha, West Tinemaha, Independence, Whitney and Lone Pine) with any legal method. The hunt dates are from July 28 to Aug. 26, 2012.