Tag Archives: California Department of Fish and Wildlife

CDFW Takes Three Golds at Excellence in Communications Competition

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Alexia Retallack received a Lifetime Achievement Award for her work in public affairs from the State Information Officers Council (SIOC). Additionally, CDFW staff from the Office of Communications, Education and Outreach took top honors in three categories of the 2014 SIOC statewide competition for excellence in state government communications.

The SIOC awards ceremony held recently recognized the frontline of professionals in media relations within state government and showcased their importance in effectively delivering agency or department messages to the public. Honors were awarded in nine different categories ranging from writing to graphic design and audio/visual productions. The annual event encompassed 15 agencies and 120 individual entries.

“I’m so proud of the way CDFW delivers our message to our constituent groups and the general public,” CDFW Deputy Director of Communications Jordan Traverso said. “Whether the message comes through a spokesperson in the field or on a DVD produced to showcase a program, our goal is to present the truest, clearest message as quickly as possible. The SIOC awards this team earned indicates they remain at the top of their game.

Highlighting the ceremony was the presentation to Retallack of the Lifetime Achievement Award. The award recognized her dedication to the field of public information for nearly two decades. Starting in 1997, Retallack has served as an information officer, an associate editor and a marketing specialist. In 2009, she took over the public affairs unit at the Office of Spill Prevention and Response under CDFW.

In addition to the three Gold Awards, CDFW earned two Silver awards and two Honorable Mentions by the panel of judges.

Gold Awards
Outdoor California, January-February Issue (publication, magazine)
California Sea Otter Fund 2014 Campaign (media campaign)
Red-Legged Frog Named State Amphibian (writing, news release)

Silver Awards
Inside California’s Emerald Triangle (writing, feature)
California Outdoors Q&As (“Best Bang for Your Buck”)

Honorable Mentions
Nightingale’s Call (writing, feature)
Special Centennial Volume of California Fish and Game (special publication)

Individual CDFW communications professionals honored included Marketing Specialists Dana Michaels, Harry Morse and Troy Swauger, Environmental Scientist Carrie Wilson, Audio-Video Specialist Debra Hamilton, Editor Vern Bleich and Communications Manager Kirsten Macintyre.

SIOC is a nonprofit organization offering professional development and networking opportunities for public information officers throughout California. Its annual competition for excellence in state government communications honor media-related professionals.

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Media Contact:
Jordan Traverso, CDFW Communications, (916) 654-9937

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

At its May 21 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $17.8 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 19 funded projects will benefit fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide the public with access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, land owners and the local community. The funds for all these projects come from initiatives approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources. Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $360,000 grant to American Rivers, Inc., for a cooperative project with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), US Forest Service (USFS), Wildlife Conservation Society, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Alpine Watershed Group, for ecological restoration of the West Fork Carson River in CDFW’s Hope Valley Wildlife Area and the USFS’s Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, 12 miles south of South Lake Tahoe in Alpine County.
  • A $450,000 grant to the Redwood Community Action Agency for a cooperative project with Humboldt and Del Norte County Agriculture Departments, California Department of Transportation, California Department of Parks and Recreation and the Yurok Tribe, to eradicate non-native knotweeds and other invasive species at more than 100 locations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties.
  • A $1.6 million grant to Pacific Forest Trust to acquire a conservation easement over approximately 3,468 acres of land to protect of a mixed conifer working forest and habitat linkages located near the community of Montague in Siskiyou County.
  • A $2.1 million grant for the acquisition of a conservation easement over approximately 1,447 acres of land by CDFW for a cooperative project with The Trust for Public Land, to protect native oak woodlands habitat near Penn Valley in Nevada County.
  • A $465,000 grant to the Santa Cruz Resource Conservation District for a cooperative project with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, California Conservation Corps, State Coastal Conservancy, State Water Resources Control Board, Land Trust of Santa Cruz County and a private landowner, to restore riparian habitat in areas critical to special status amphibian and fish species, located on two coastal watersheds in Santa Cruz County.
  • A $568,000 grant to The Nature Conservancy for a cooperative project with the National Park Service to eliminate Argentine ants from Santa Cruz Island, approximately 20 miles west of Ventura Harbor in Santa Barbara County.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

small river with pebble bottom running through a dry Alpine wilderness
West Fork Carson River in CDFW’s Hope Valley Wildlife Area and the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, in Alpine County. WCB photo
Green, leafy groundcover blankets floor of deciduous forest
Non-native knotweeds and other invasive species found in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. Photo by Monica Walker
narrow creek runs through green meadow with a few tall conifer trees
Butte Creek in Siskiyou County
Black, red and white sign warning of Argentine ants, posted on rural wood fence
Invasive Argentine ants warning on Santa Cruz Island, in the Santa Barbara Channel.
Creek runs through green and brown forest brush
Riparian habitat in areas critical to special status amphibian and fish species, in a coastal watershed in Santa Cruz County. WCB photo
Oak trees on a hill surrounded by dry, yellow grasses
Native oak woodlands habitat near Penn Valley in Nevada County. WCB photo

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Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Education and Outreach, (916) 322-2420

Nonlead Ammunition Requirement Approaches

Starting July 1, 2015, nonlead ammunition will be required when hunting on all California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) lands and for all Nelson bighorn sheep hunts anywhere in the state.

CDFW reminds hunters who plan to hunt bighorn sheep or at any CDFW wildlife areas or ecological reserves where hunting is allowed on or after July 1, 2015 to acquire nonlead ammunition well ahead of their hunt.  Hunters are also encouraged to practice shooting nonlead ammunition to make sure firearms are sighted-in properly and shoot accurately with nonlead ammunition. Please note nonlead ammunition for some firearm calibers may be in short supply and hunters should plan accordingly.

CDFW held 14 public meetings in 12 cities from Eureka to San Diego to gain comments from hunters on how best to implement AB 711, the legislation that requires nonlead ammunition for all hunting statewide by July 1, 2019. The department listened to feedback from hunters and proposed an implementation plan that would be least disruptive to the hunting community while adhering to the requirements of the law. The California Fish and Game Commission recently adopted the implementation plan.

Further phase-out of lead ammunition for hunting in California will occur on July 1, 2016, when hunters must use nonlead ammunition when hunting with shotguns for upland game birds (except for dove, quail and snipe), small game mammals, fur-bearing mammals, and nongame birds except for when hunting at licensed game bird clubs. Nonlead ammunition will also be required when taking wildlife for depredation purposes anywhere in the state.Starting on July 1, 2019 hunters must use nonlead ammunition when taking any animal anywhere in the state for any purpose.

Lead ammunition may still be used for all non-hunting purposes including target shooting. The implementation of AB 711 does not affect the laws regarding the existing nonlead “Condor Zone” where it remains illegal to hunt using lead ammunition.

Hunting is not allowed at all CDFW wildlife areas and ecological reserves. For those areas where hunting is allowed, nonlead ammunition will be required starting July 1, 2015. Hunters are reminded to be familiar with all hunting regulations before going into the field.

A list of CDFW wildlife areas and ecological reserves along with specific regulations for each can be found in the booklet, Hunting Regulations for Waterfowl, Upland Game and Department Lands Public Use at https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=88820&inline.

Information on certified nonlead ammunition can be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/lead-free/certifiedammo.html.

More information on the phase-out of lead ammunition for hunting in California can be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/lead-free/.

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Media Contacts:
Craig Stowers, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-3553
Clark Blanchard, CDFW Communications, (916) 651-7824
Lt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 651-6692

Big Game Drawing Deadline Approaches

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is reminding hunters that the deadline to apply for the 2015 Big Game Drawing is June 2, 2015. Applicants must complete the sales transaction before midnight on June 2, 2015. Applications for elk, antelope, bighorn sheep, premium deer tags and fundraising drawing tags may be submitted at any CDFW license agent, CDFW license sales office, by telephone sales or online.

The following resources are available to assist hunters in applying for the big game drawing:

  • Proposed seasons, tag drawing application instructions and drawing statistics can be found in the 2015 California Big Game Hunting Digest. The book is available at www.dfg.ca.gov/publications/digest/.
  • Final 2015 big-game tag quotas can be found on the respective species web page located under the “Hunting” tab at www.wildlife.ca.gov.
  • To find a license agent near you or to purchase items online, visit www.ca.wildlifelicense.com/internetsales/.
  • To submit drawing applications by telephone, contact the telephone sales line at (800) 565-1458.

 Junior Hunting License Changes

Junior Hunting License applicants must now be under 18 years of age as of July 1 of the license year. Applicants with a Junior Hunting License will be eligible to apply for the apprentice hunt tags.

Harvest Reporting Now Mandatory

Beginning with the 2015 deer season, all deer hunters will be required to report their deer tags to CDFW. Any person who is issued a deer tag must submit a report for the tag after the hunt, even if they did not hunt, or if they did not harvest a deer. Imposition of the $20 non-reporting fee has been delayed by the Fish and Game Commission until the 2016 season. Failure to report 2016 results will require payment of the non-reporting fee prior to purchasing tags and tag applications in 2017.

Hunters have two methods to submit their harvest reports:

  • Online – Submit an online report for each deer tag you are issued, at www.ca.wildlifelicense.com/internetsales/. When you report online, you receive instant confirmation that your report has been received and accepted.
  • By Mail – Any person who does not report their deer tag online must return the report card portion of each deer tag they are issued to: CDFW – Wildlife Branch, PO Box 944209, Sacramento, CA 94299-0002.

D6 Deer Tag Quota Raised

The D6 zone deer tag is classified as a premium deer tag for the 2015 hunting season. Hunters interested in the D6 zone deer tag will need to apply through the annual Big Game Drawing. The D6 zone deer tag quota has been increased to 10,000 tags for the 2015 hunting season, an increase of 4,000 tags from 2014.

Fundraising Random Drawing Opportunities

CDFW’s fundraising random drawing tags are open to any resident or nonresident 12 years of age or older as of July 1, 2015. The cost to enter the drawings is $5.97 per entry, per hunt. Applicants may apply as many times as the wish. The sales transaction must also be completed before midnight on June 2, 2015. Applicants do not need a valid hunting license to apply, but a license must be purchased prior to issuing the tag. The tag will be issued at no additional cost.

The fundraising random drawing tags consist of the open zone deer tag, the multiple zone elk tag and the northeastern California pronghorn antelope tag. This year the program will not include a bighorn sheep tag drawing.

Open Zone Deer Tag

An open zone deer tag allows the hunter to hunt during the authorized season dates of any hunt, using the specific method and meeting any special conditions of the tag for that hunt.

Multiple Zone Elk Tag

The fundraising random drawing elk tag allows the hunter to hunt in any of the following zones: Northwestern, Northeastern, Marble Mountains, Siskiyou and La Panza. Hunters may use any legal method of take. All three subspecies of elk may be hunted, although only one elk may be harvested. The hunt dates open one week prior to the earliest season in that zone and run through the end of the regular season.

Northeastern California Pronghorn Antelope Tag

The fundraising random drawing antelope tag allows the hunter to hunt in any of the northeastern antelope zones (Mount Dome, Clear Lake, Likely Tables, Lassen, Big Valley and Surprise Valley) with any legal method. The hunt dates are from Aug. 1 to Sept. 20, 2015.

Media Contacts:
Lai Saechao, CDFW Big Game Hunting Program, (916) 928-7416
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

May 15 is the 10th National Endangered Species Day

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) recognizes the 10th National Endangered Species Day with a focused environmental concern. The purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to conserve imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend to prevent extinction. Special activities are scheduled at the zoos in San Diego, Santa Ana, Los Angeles and San Francisco, at Yosemite National Park, San Diego National Wildlife Refuge, San Diego Botanic Gardens, Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in San Pedro, Buena Vista Audubon Society Nature Center, San Francisco Zoo and Sacramento’s Beach Lake Park. Visit www.endangeredspeciesday.org to learn more. California, with all its geographic variety, has tremendous biological diversity. Our state supports more than 5,000 native plants and more than 1,000 native animal species. At least one third of the plants and two thirds of the animals here are endemic species that occur nowhere else in the world. Of all these species, more than 300 are designated by the state as rare, threatened or endangered. There are 133 species listed under the federal Endangered Species Act in California. Loss of habitat, water management conflicts, invasive species, poaching and climate change are the greatest threats to their long-term survival. The combination of wildfires and extreme drought conditions in most of the state add to the pressures on our already-stressed wild plants and animals. CDFW is paying special attention to priority listed species and other sensitive native wildlife that are in areas most severely affected by the drought. Emergency drought funds support projects that transferred water to critical fish and wildlife populations that might not have survived the continuing severe dry conditions without it. Examples of actions taken last year include the flooding of wetland habitats for giant garter snakes in State Wildlife Areas and the relocation of stranded salmon and steelhead. CDFW is establishing fish and wildlife stressor monitoring to assess the drought’s effects and identify key support projects for high-priority listed species such as Amargosa vole, tri-colored blackbird, salmon and species that occur in the San Joaquin Valley. One endangered plant is Butte County meadowfoam (Limnanthes floccosa ssp. californica), a small annual plant that only occurs at the bottom of rocky vernal pools in Butte County. The species has been protected at CDFW’s Stone Ridge and North Table Mountain Ecological Reserves, and although several thousand plants were observed at Stone Ridge this year, only 107 plants were counted at North Table Mountain, which is open to the public and offers fantastic spring wildflower viewing. Endangered Species Day was started in 2006 by the U.S. Senate to raise awareness of and celebrate these disappearing plant and animal species, and draw attention to successful recovery programs and opportunities for the public to get involved. It also honors the people who uphold the legacy of the Act while inspiring the next generation of conservation leaders. To learn more about CDFW’s drought-related actions to protect California’s fish and wildlife, visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/drought.

Gray owl on tree branch
A great gray owl in Sierra National Forest near Oakhurst. Chris Stermer/CDFW photo
Orange and yellow globe-like flower
Pitkin marsh lily, (lilium pardalinum), a state-listed endangered species. Roxanne Bittman/DFG photo
gray freshwater fish with salmon-colored sides and gills in clear stream
Rare Paiute cutthroat trout in a remote Alpine County stream. CDFW photo.
A red fox with black legs and ears, sitting in snow
Sierra Nevada red fox, in Sonora Pass area, Mono County. CDFW photo
A light brown vole in a gloved hand
Captive Amargosa vole. Don Preisler/UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine
Western pond turtle on dry gravel
Western pond turtle. Christina Sousa/CDFW photo
a dark gray salamander on wet dirt
Santa Cruz Long-Toed Salamander. David Laabs photo.
Tan and brown giant garter snake
Female, standard brown giant garter snake. Eric Hansen photo

Media Contacts: Daniel Applebee, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (209) 588-1879 Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

Poachers Take Advantage of Drought Conditions to Target Juvenile Salmon

California wildlife officers patrolling the Sacramento River recently cited six suspects for unlawfully taking and possessing juvenile salmon, and using the young fish as bait to target sturgeon. All of the suspects initially denied use of salmon as bait, but wildlife officers were able to reel in their lines and show them the dead salmon on their hooks.

The alleged poachers worked during the early morning hours under the cover of darkness and focused their effort on sandbars on the Sacramento River in Yolo and Sacramento counties. The sandbars were recently exposed due to drought conditions. Wildlife officers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Delta Bay Enhanced Enforcement Project (DBEEP), Special Operations Unit (SOU) and local squads continue to use the Governor’s drought overtime support to step up patrols in these sensitive areas to protect salmon and sturgeon from poachers.

In the first case, a wildlife officer observed two subjects wading in the Sacramento River and using a large net to capture juvenile salmon near a sandbar created by the low flow conditions. They netted the small salmon for later use as bait to fish for sturgeon. The wildlife officer ultimately determined that the two anglers and one more fisherman used fishing rods baited with the juvenile salmon they’d caught. Tony Saetern, 25, Michael Anglero, 24, and Kao Saeyang, 28, all of Sacramento, were each cited for unlawful use of salmon as bait and unlawful possession of salmon out of season.

A few nights later, wildlife officers observed a suspect using a hand light and dip net to unlawfully capture and keep multiple juvenile salmon in the same area of the Sacramento River. The officers watched as a total of three suspects in the group appeared to use the salmon as bait for fishing. Officers contacted the suspects and found two of them in possession of fishing rods with hooks baited with the salmon. As the officers were conducting the investigation, a sturgeon was hooked on another fishing rod belonging to the group, was landed and released. Officers found the group in possession of a Snapple beverage bottle containing 14 additional juvenile salmon for later use as bait.

Nai Poo Saechao, 36, of Antelope and Lai C Saechao, 27, of Sacramento, were both cited for unlawful use of salmon as bait, possession of salmon out of season and an overlimit of salmon. Vincent Sai Poo Saechao, 23, of Antelope, was cited for unlawful method of take of salmon.

“During this time of year, juvenile salmon are migrating downstream to the Delta and are vulnerable to this type of poaching as they seek shelter from prey fish close to shore,” DBEEP Warden Byron Trunnell explained. “Salmon season is closed on the Sacramento River, and nets are not an authorized method of take for game fish in inland waters.”

The unlawful practice of catching juvenile salmon for bait has long been a concern and is an enforcement priority this time of year. Poaching pressure on salmon is particularly harmful now, given California’s current drought situation. CDFW and numerous other agencies on both the state and federal levels are taking action wherever possible to support the long-term viability of salmon populations of the Sacramento River watershed.

CDFW appreciates legitimate anglers and asks for the public’s help in apprehending those who are taking advantage of our natural resources. Illegal activity can be reported through the CDFW Californians Turn In Poachers and Polluters (CalTIP) line at 888-334-2258, or via email or text (please see www.dfg.ca.gov/enforcement/caltip.aspx for details).

Media Contact:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 508-7095CDFW Wildlife Officer (2)

CDFW to Host Public Meeting Regarding the Coastal Pelagic Species Live Bait Fishery

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) invites the public to attend an informational meeting in Los Alamitos to discuss the Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Live Bait fishery in California.

The meeting will be held at the WestEd Building in the Ed Myers Classroom (enter at WestEd lobby in front of the building) at the following time and location:

Thursday, May 28
1-4 p.m.
4665 Lampson Ave. #A,
Los Alamitos (90729)

The meeting will provide information on recent changes to voluntary logbooks and include a discussion on how CDFW can work with the industry to collect information to better inform fishery management. The public is encouraged to provide input to managers and representatives that will assist in the development of future data collection.

CPS Live Bait fishing for species such as sardine, anchovy and squid is an important component of recreational fishing. CPS are monitored and managed through a collaborative process with the Pacific Fishery Management Council, the National Marine Fisheries Service, other West Coast states and the California Fish and Game Commission.

Please visit the CDFW CPS-HMS Project webpage (www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/cpshms/) for more details regarding this meeting, including how to watch the meeting online.

Media Contacts:
Kirk Lynn, CDFW Marine Region, (858) 546-7167
Carrie Wilson, CDFW Communications, (831) 649-7191

Increase in Turtle “Rescues” Prompts CDFW Reminder: If You Care, Leave Them There

More than a few kind-hearted Californians are unnecessarily “rescuing” western pond turtles this spring, and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is imploring to the public to leave them alone. Turtles normally travel away from water during a portion of their life cycle, and a solo turtle is not necessarily a lost or distressed turtle. Spring is nesting season, so many turtles are leaving their aquatic habitat and traveling upland to lay eggs.

Wildlife rehabilitation centers and animal shelters report that a surprising number of people have been bringing healthy western pond turtles – California’s only native freshwater turtle species – to their facilities, thinking there is something wrong with them because they’re not in a pond. The common name “pond turtle” doesn’t mean they never leave ponds. In fact, this species more frequently lives in rivers, streams, lakes, and permanent and temporary wetlands. It requires terrestrial habitats not only to nest, but also to wait out extended hot, dry periods or overwinter in a state of dormancy throughout many parts of California.

While most western pond turtles nest somewhat near water, they have been documented traveling long distances (more than 500 yards) to upland habitat to lay eggs and sometimes even farther to overwinter. With water becoming more scarce as the drought persists, more turtles are moving upland earlier in the season to estivate (summer dormancy). People may encounter turtles during these travels and think they are lost or sick, since they are quite some distance from water. CDFW receives many contacts from well-meaning people who report that they have found and collected what they believe to be a sick turtle, when in reality the turtle was traveling to upland habitat as part of its natural activities.

Western pond turtles are designated as a “species of special concern” in California, “critical” in Oregon, and “endangered” in Washington. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced in April that the species may warrant protection under the federal Endangered Species Act.

“Western pond turtles face a number of threats throughout their range,” said Laura Patterson, CDFW’s Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Coordinator. “They are shy animals and sensitive to human disturbance. Anyone who removes a healthy turtle from the wild is potentially compromising its ability to successfully reproduce and survive in the future. In addition, anyone – other than a licensed wildlife rehabilitator – who releases turtles that have been kept in captivity is not only breaking the law but putting the health of wild populations at risk by spreading disease. These actions are almost always unnecessary and often quite counterproductive, so I urge the public to take a hands-off approach to caring for these sensitive, imperiled animals.”

Western pond turtle populations have declined significantly in some parts of the state, especially Southern California, due to habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation. Predation, competition and diseases from non-native species, including pet turtles released into the wild, have also contributed to declines and localized extinctions.

According to the California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 40, it is illegal to capture, collect, intentionally kill or injure, possess, purchase, propagate, sell, transport, import or export any native reptile or amphibian, or part of one, with very few exceptions. Native reptiles covered under the law include western pond turtles and desert tortoises. Once they’ve been in captivity, they may not be returned to the wild without written authorization from CDFW.

It is best to leave all native wildlife alone. If you care, leave them there!

A brochure with more information on western pond turtles and what to do if you find one can be downloaded at http://tinyurl.com/ljy5cmu.

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Media Contacts:
Laura Patterson, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 341-6981
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

CDFW Schedules Additional Public Meetings on Lands Pass Program

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has scheduled two additional public meetings regarding possible changes to its Lands Pass Program. The meetings will be held in Butte and San Diego counties on the following dates:

Monday, April 13
Butte County Library, Gridley Branch
299 Spruce St.
Gridley (95948)
directions

Wednesday, April 15
City of Carlsbad, Faraday Center
1635 Faraday Ave.
Carlsbad (92008)
directions

Both meetings will be in an “open house” format; doors will be open from 5 to 8 p.m. and participants may arrive at any time during that window. CDFW staff will provide information about the current Lands Pass Program and discuss possible changes to the program that are under evaluation by CDFW. Staff will also explain the process for amending regulations and how the public can participate in the review process. Posters and written materials will be available and CDFW staff will answer questions.

Currently, visitors to CDFW wildlife areas and ecological reserves in this program must purchase a day or annual pass prior to visiting the properties. Purchases are made online, from license vendors or from CDFW offices in advance (no passes are sold on-site at the properties). Exemptions from this requirement include visitors who bring a valid hunting or fishing license, children under the age of 16 and participants in organized school or youth group field trips.

The first public meeting on this subject was held in March in Yolo County. If additional meetings are scheduled, they will be posted on the CDFW Public Meetings and Notices webpage (www.wildlife.ca.gov/notices).

For more information about the current Lands Pass Program, please visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/licensing/lands-pass.

Questions about these meetings may be directed to CDFW Senior Environmental Scientist Julie Horenstein at julie.horenstein@wildlife.ca.gov or (916) 324-3772.

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Media Contacts:
Julie Horenstein, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 324-3772
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

2015 Big Game Digest Now Available Online

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has posted the 2015 Big Game Digest to its website. The 64-page document can be downloaded online for free at www.dfg.ca.gov/publications/digest/.

2015 California Big Game Hunting DigestThe popular guide includes season, quota and harvest information for deer, elk, pronghorn antelope and bighorn sheep, as well as tag drawing information, bear and wild pig hunting information and big game hunting regulations for the 2015-16 seasons.

Printed copies of the Big Game Digest will automatically be mailed in late April to hunters who purchased a big game tag or applied for the Big Game Drawing in California in 2014.

“As printing costs continue to rise, more funding for big game conservation will be available if the department reduces printing and mailing costs,” said Dan Yparraguirre, CDFW’s Deputy Director of Wildlife and Fisheries. “Making the Big Game Digest available online also means that hunters can access this information sooner.”

Hunting licenses, tags and drawing applications will be available on April 15. Purchases may be made through the Online License Service, at any CDFW License Sales Office or License Agent, or by telephone at (800) 565-1458. The deadline to apply for the Big Game Drawing is midnight on June 2.

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Media Contact:
Stuart Itoga, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-3642
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988