Category Archives: Youth

Youth Waterfowl Hunting Days Approach for the 2016-2017 Season

As in years past, California’s young hunters will have one weekend to hunt in the Northeastern Zone before the general waterfowl seasons open around the state. The Youth Waterfowl Days in the Northeastern Zone for the 2016-2017 season fall on Saturday, Sept. 24 and Sunday, Sept. 25.

Beginning with the 2016-2017 waterfowl season, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service raised the age to participate in Youth Waterfowl Days to include licensed youth hunters who are 17 years of age or younger at the time of the hunt. All youth hunters must be accompanied by a non-hunting adult who is 18 years of age or older.

In the Southern San Joaquin Valley, Southern California, Colorado River and Balance of the State zones, Youth Waterfowl Hunt Days will be Feb. 4 and Feb. 5, 2017.

Youth Waterfowl Days are allowed on state wildlife areas, federal refuges and private lands. Federal refuges and state wildlife areas in the Northeastern Zone (with the exception of Willow Creek) will be open for youth hunting on those days. Hunters and chaperones should contact specific areas for details on hunt opportunities.

Youth Waterfowl Days are held in addition to the regular waterfowl seasons and must be held outside any regular duck season, regardless of location. Federal regulations require any waterfowl hunter that is 16 years of age or older to possess a federal duck stamp.

The complete regulations can be found at www.wildlife.ca.gov/hunting/waterfowl.

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Media Contacts:
Melanie Weaver, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-3717
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

Sandhill Crane Tours Showcase Birds with New Classification

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The sandhill crane is making its annual migration to the Central Valley – this time with a new name.

Previously known as Grus canadensis, genetic work has led scientists to reclassify the bird as Antigone canadensis (named after Oedipus’ daughter and half-sister in Greek mythology).

“Antigone is most associated with loyal devotion to family, and this brand fits well with observing cranes. Monogamy is displayed among mated pairs, and parents and juveniles are viewable together, moving about in family units of three or four,” said CDFW Interpretive Supervisor David Moore. “This season, the docents have a new name to interpret for our sandhill crane viewers.”

CDFW provides the public a chance to see an annual bird migration and learn the latest on the sandhill crane – including the name change. The Sandhill Crane Wetland Tour Program offers weekend tours October through February at the Woodbridge Ecological Reserve outside of Lodi.

The late-afternoon tours, which begin Oct. 1, are offered on the first through third Saturdays and Sundays of each month for the five-month duration of the cranes’ fall/winter season stay in the valley. Tours consist of viewing sandhill cranes and other unique wintering waterfowl, hearing a presentation on sandhill cranes and their habitat, and viewing the cranes’ impressive, nightly behaviors at a location that is only open to the public during tour hours.

Online pre-registration is required and may be done up to eight weeks prior to the tour date. Registration is now open for October dates and will soon open for November tour dates. More information may be found at www.wildlife.ca.gov/regions/3/crane-tour.

The cranes are a great draw to the Lodi area and CDFW Interpretive Services staff has provided important messages of conservation to more than 20,000 visitors on the docent-led tours over the last two decades.

The reserve is readily accessible at any time for self-guided tours. A series of informative interpretive panels at the Woodbridge Ecological Reserve, South Unit on Woodbridge Road provides visitors with a wealth of information about the cranes and their habitat. Staying until sundown is recommended for witnessing sights and sounds of the “fly-over” as groups of cranes return to roosting spots for the evening.

CDFW is also a co-sponsor the Lodi Sandhill Crane Festival, slated for Nov. 4-6, 2016. Information about festival tours and activities is available at www.cranefestival.com/index.php.

Media Contacts:

David Moore, CDFW Interpretive Services, (707) 766-8380

Steve Gonzalez, CDFW Communications, (916) 715-9072

 

CDFW Opens Chimineas Unit of Carrizo Plain Ecological Reserve for Apprentice Deer Hunters

jr deer hunter w guideThe California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will be holding a draw for an apprentice deer hunt on the Chimineas Unit of the Carrizo Plains Ecological Reserve. The two-day hunt, which is being offered in cooperation with the California Deer Association (CDA), will be held on Sept. 17-18 on the 30,000-acre reserve in San Luis Obispo County.

Mandatory hunter orientation will be held in the evening on Sept. 16. Overnight lodging will be available at the main ranch house on the ecological reserve on Sept. 16 and 17.

Three apprentice hunters will be chosen by lottery. Selected apprentice hunters must be accompanied by an adult. Participants will receive classroom, range and field training in gun handling techniques and safety, deer hunting and game care. Hunts will be led by CDA volunteers. CDA will also provide breakfast, lunch and dinner on Sept. 17, as well as breakfast and lunch on Sept. 18.

Applicants must submit a postcard with the hunter’s name, address, telephone number and 2016-2017 junior hunting license number to: Chimineas Apprentice Deer Hunt, Department of Fish and Wildlife, 3196 South Higuera St., Suite A, San Luis Obispo, 93401.

Only one postcard may be submitted for each applicant. Applications must be received in the office by 5 p.m. on Aug. 12. Late or incomplete applications will not be entered in the drawing. Successful applicants will be notified by phone and will receive additional information, including maps and special regulations, prior to the hunt. Successful applicants will need to possess a valid A zone deer tag at the time of the hunt.

Media Contacts:

Rocky Thompson, CDFW Senior Environmental Scientist, (805) 594-6175

Steve Gonzalez, CDFW Communications, (916) 715-9072

July 2 is Free Fishing Day in California

AVU-2016-0013 (421)Have you ever felt the excitement of catching a fish? This summer, angling novices can experience the thrill for free. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) invites all Californians to fish on July 2 and Sept. 3 – no fishing license required. If you would like to fish the rest of the year, you can purchase a license online through CDFW’s website.

“Free Fishing Day is always great opportunity to try an all-American pastime that is one of my favorites,” said CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham. “If you’re already an experienced angler, I encourage you to invite a friend, relative or neighbor who’s never tried it or who wants more experience.”

A basic annual resident sport fishing license in California currently costs $47.01, but CDFW offers two Free Fishing Days each year – usually around the Fourth of July and Labor Day weekend – when it’s legal to fish without one. This year, the first of the two Free Fishing Days falls on the Saturday of Independence Day weekend.

All fishing regulations, such as bag and size limits, gear restrictions, report card requirements, fishing hours and stream closures remain in effect. Every angler must have an appropriate report card if they are fishing for steelhead or sturgeon anywhere in the state, or salmon in the Smith and Klamath-Trinity river systems.

Anglers can review the sport fishing regulations online (www.wildlife.ca.gov/regulations) or use CDFW’s mobile web site to view limits and regulations specific to a body of water (https://map.dfg.ca.gov/sportfishingregs/).

Media Contacts:

Steve Gonzalez, CDFW Communications, (916) 715-9072

Kyle Murphy, CDFW Fisheries Branch, (916) 323-5556

Fresno, Livermore and Sacramento Valley Students Take Top Honors in 2016 Invasive Species Youth Art Contest

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Invasive Species Program Choice Award: Amelie Ingram, 10, Fred T. Korematsu Elementary School, Davis

The winners of “The Invader Files” Youth Art Contest have been announced by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Invasive Species Program.

As part of the California Invasive Species Action Week, 49 youths from across California submitted their original artwork. Participants were asked to pick an invasive species that causes harm to native species or the environment in California and submit their illustration of that invader and the harm it causes. The top three posters for each grade division were selected by members of the California Invasive Species Advisory Committee and the poster which best exemplified the contest theme was selected as the CDFW Invasive Species Program Choice Award.

Amelie Ingram, 10, a student at Fred T. Korematsu Elementary School in Davis, was named the winner of the Invasive Species Program Choice Award. Ingram created a comic depicting the common coqui (frog) displacing native species.

“What happens in real life is invasive species take resources like water, food and space/home from native animals,” Ingram wrote. “As they overpopulate, less native animals have homes. They are small, but scary.”

The top three winners of the 2016 Invasive Species Action Week Youth Art Contest divisions were:

Grades 2-4

  • First Place: Elsa Thornton, 10, Fort Washington Elementary School, Fresno
  • Second Place: Rylynn Shackelford, 9, Fort Washington Elementary School, Fresno
  • Third Place: Addison Galaviz, 10, Fort Washington Elementary School, Fresno
    Thornton
    First Place, Grades 2-4: Elsa Thornton, 10, Fort Washington Elementary School, Fresno
    Shackelford
    Second Place, Grades 2-4: Rylynn Shackelford, 9, Fort Washington Elementary School, Fresno

    A_Galaviz
    Third Place, Grades 2-4: Addison Galaviz, 10, Fort Washington Elementary School, Fresno

Grades 5-8

  • First Place: Luke Jiang, 11, Homeschool, Rancho Cordova,
    Second Place: Andre Russell, 11, Fort Washington Elementary School, Fresno
  • Third Place: Malia Jones, 11, Heron Elementary, Sacramento
    Jiang
    First Place, Grades 5-8: Luke Jiang, 11, Homeschool, Rancho Cordova,
    Russell
    Second Place, Grades 5-8: Andre Russell, 11, Fort Washington Elementary School, Fresno

    Jones
    Third Place, Grades 5-8: Malia Jones, 11, Heron Elementary, Sacramento

Grades 9-12

  • First Place: Bey Westcott, 18, Granada High School, Livermore
  • Second Place: Valerie Felismino, 17, Granada High School, Livermore
  • Third Place: Katey Rademann, 16, Granada High School, Livermore
    Westcott
    First Place, Grades 9-12: Bey Westcott, 18, Granada High School, Livermore
    Felismino
    Second Place, Grades 9-12: Valerie Felismino, 17, Granada High School, Livermore

    Rademann
    Third Place, Grades 9-12: Katey Rademann, 16, Granada High School, Livermore

 

CDFW congratulates all the participants for their excellent work and thanks the teachers, nature centers, volunteer organizations and parents who encouraged, educated and assisted the students.

All submissions are currently on display in the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center in Gold River. They can also be viewed online at: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B-vFHRGZmgqjTkt4NUF5b2tOZEU&usp=sharing.

For more information or to obtain artwork images, please contact the Invasive Species Program at invasives@wildlife.ca.gov.

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Media Contacts:
Valerie Cook Fletcher, CDFW Invasive Species Program, (916) 654-4267
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988