Category Archives: Wildlife

CDFW to Hold Public Outreach Meeting on Grizzly Island, Yolo Bypass Wildlife Areas

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will hold an outreach meeting on Wednesday, June 6 in Davis regarding Bay Delta Region Type A wildlife areas. CDFW will take comments and recommendations and provide updates on habitat conditions, availability of water for wetlands and possible impacts to hunter access on these public lands.

The meeting will take place from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area’s conference room, which is located at 45211 County Road 32B in Davis. State wildlife areas to be discussed are the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area and the Grizzly Island Wildlife Area Complex.

CDFW’s Bay Delta Region includes 12 counties in northern California and is one of seven CDFW regions in the state.

CDFW annually provides an opportunity for licensed hunters to comment and make recommendations on public hunting programs, including anticipated habitat conditions in the hunting areas on wildlife areas through public meetings and other outreach.

Media Contacts:
Joe Hobbs, Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, (530) 757-2431
Larry Wyckoff, Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, (707) 944-5542
Peter Tira, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

 

CDFW photo courtesy of Stuart Itoga.

Applications Now Being Accepted for North Coast Natural Resource Volunteer Program

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is currently seeking applicants for its Natural Resource Volunteer Program (NRVP) in the Humboldt area.

Motivated individuals with an ability and willingness to convey conservation principles to the public are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be confident and capable of speaking with the public one-on-one and in group settings. They must also be able to work independently and as a team member to complete tasks. Assignments will be in field, office and classroom environments.

“Our volunteers provide invaluable support to numerous CDFW staff, including biologists, wildlife officers and administrative employees,” said CDFW NRVP Coordinator Lt. Liz Gregory. “These are non-sworn, volunteer positions, without law enforcement authority, but their contributions to our daily workload are meaningful and help keep our operations running smoothly.”

NRVP positions are unpaid and require a service commitment of 16 hours per month. Duties may include responding to human/wildlife conflict calls, representing CDFW at community outreach events, working on CDFW lands, disseminating useful information to the public, instructing at NRVP academies and other assignments to assist staff as needed.

Applicants must be at least 18 years of age, possess a California driver license and produce a California Department of Motor Vehicle driver’s report. The selection process includes an initial screening, application review, oral interview and a background check including a Live Scan fingerprint clearance.

Successful applicants will receive 40 hours of conservation training at the NRVP academy from Aug. 6–10, 2018. Volunteers will then work with a trained mentor to implement their newly acquired skills during a six-month probationary period.

For additional information and to download an application, please visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/explore/volunteering/nrvp. Applications must be postmarked no later than June 4. For more information, please contact Lt. Gregory at (916) 358-2939.

Media Contacts:
Lt. Liz Gregory,  CDFW Northern Enforcement District, Natural Resource Volunteer Program, (916) 358-2939
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

CDFW to Hold Public Meeting on North Central Region Type A Wildlife Areas

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will hold its annual public outreach meeting on April 28 in Gridley regarding North Central Region Type A wildlife areas. CDFW will take comments and recommendations from the public and provide updates on habitat conditions, availability of water for wetlands and possible impacts to hunter access on these public lands.

State wildlife areas to be discussed are the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area and the Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area Complex (Little Dry Creek Unit, Howard Slough Unit and Llano Seco Unit). The meeting is scheduled from 1-3 p.m. in the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area’s main office conference room, 3207 Rutherford Road, in Gridley.

CDFW’s North Central Region covers all or part of 17 counties in northern California and is one of seven CDFW regions in the state.

CDFW annually provides an opportunity for licensed hunters to comment and make recommendations on public hunting programs, including anticipated habitat conditions in the hunting areas on wildlife areas, through public meetings and other outreach.

Media Contacts:
Tim Hermansen, Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area, (530) 982-2169
Andy Atkinson, Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, (530) 846-7500
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

Waterfowl Hunting Regulations Set for 2018-19 Season

The California Fish and Game Commission adopted the 2018-19 waterfowl hunting regulations at their regularly scheduled meeting on April 19. The pintail daily bag limit has returned to two, and there have been some changes to accommodate a longer late season for white-fronted geese in the Northeastern Zone. The Commission also created a Special Management Area in the Klamath Basin, which is exempt from this change.

The following is a summary of the regulations:

Duck Seasons

  • Northeastern Zone will be open for ducks from Oct. 6, 2018 through Jan. 18, 2019. Scaup season will be open from Oct. 6, 2018 through Dec. 2, 2019, and from Dec. 22, 2018 through Jan. 18, 2019.
  • Balance of State, Southern San Joaquin Valley and Southern California zones will be open from Oct. 20, 2018 through Jan. 27, 2019. Scaup season will be open from Nov. 3, 2018 through Jan. 27, 2019.
  • Colorado River Zone will be open from Oct. 19, 2018 through Jan. 27, 2019. Scaup season will be open from Nov. 3, 2018 through Jan. 27, 2019.

Bag Limits

  • Seven ducks per day, which includes no more than two hen mallards (or Mexican-like ducks in the Colorado River Zone), two pintail, two canvasback, two redheads and three scaup (which may only be taken during the 86-day scaup season).
  • The possession limit for ducks is triple the daily bag limit.

Goose Seasons

  • In the Northeastern Zone, the season will be open for white geese and white-fronted geese from Oct. 6, 2018 through Dec. 2, 2018, and Jan. 5-18, 2019 (except in the new Klamath Basin Special Management Area). The season will be open for large Canada geese from Oct. 6, 2018 through Jan. 13, 2019. In the Klamath Basin Special Management Area, the season will be open for white geese and white-fronted geese from Oct. 6, 2018 through Jan. 18, 2019.
  • Balance of State, Southern San Joaquin Valley and Southern California zones will be open from Oct. 20, 2018 through Jan. 27, 2019.
    • Balance of State Zone will also be open for early large Canada geese from Sept. 29, 2018 through Oct. 3, 2018 (except in the North Coast Special Management Area).
    • Balance of State Zone will also be open for late season white-fronted and white geese from Feb. 9-13, 2019.
  • Colorado River Zone will be open from Oct. 19, 2018 through Jan. 27, 2019.

Bag Limits

  • Northeastern Zone, 30 total geese per day, which may include 20 white geese and 10 dark geese, of which only two may be large Canada geese.
  • Balance of State and Southern San Joaquin Valley zones, 30 total geese per day, which may include 20 white geese and 10 dark geese.
  • Southern California Zone, 23 total geese per day, which may include 20 white geese and three dark geese.
  • Colorado River Zone, 24 total geese per day, which may include 20 white geese and four dark geese.
  • The possession limit for geese is triple the daily bag limit.

 

 

 The complete regulations will be posted at www.wildlife.ca.gov/Hunting/Waterfowl.

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Media Contacts:
Melanie Weaver, CDFW Waterfowl Program, (916) 445-3717

Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988                                                                       

 

 

Californians Help Endangered Species on State Tax Returns

Income tax returns are due April 16, so there’s still time to make a Voluntary Tax Contribution or two that benefit wildlife on your California Form 540. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) needs your help to save the more than 300 listed threatened and endangered plant and animal species that are native to our state.

The Rare and Endangered Species Preservation Program continues to benefit California’s native at-risk fish, wildlife and plants, thanks to the generosity of California taxpayers. Donations to this fund have enabled CDFW to obtain matching funds from the federal government and collaborate with numerous stakeholders and organizations—including other government agencies—to conserve native wildlife and restore habitat. As federal funds decrease, public support becomes ever more crucial to keep recovery work on track.

Your voluntary contributions have enabled CDFW botanists to review the status of Lassics lupine and coast yellow leptosiphon, which are both candidate species for state listing. We recently leveraged your tax donation funds to obtain a second federal grant to conduct important monitoring of more threatened and endangered plant species.

Great gray owl, Mohave ground squirrel, mountain yellow-legged frog, willow flycatcher, desert pupfish, and giant garter snake are also among the species CDFW’s wildlife biologists are working with to ensure they survive well into the future, thanks to this endangered species fund.

In the marine environment, Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) benefit from donations to the California Sea Otter Fund. There were once as many as 16,000 sea otters along California’s coast. The 2017 population survey counted fewer than 3,000 individuals—a slight decrease from the 2016 count.

Your donations to the Sea Otter Fund on line 410 support research on the causes of mortality in this species and other projects to help the sea otter population recover. The Southern sea otter is listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act, depleted under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and fully protected by the State of California.

CDFW scientists have achieved important recovery milestones and protected many vulnerable species, with support from California taxpayers. There is no upper limit to donations and any amount is appreciated. Please give what you can, and remember, their future is in our hands, and your contributions can help save them.  More information about how CDFW uses these Voluntary Tax Contribution Funds is available at www.wildlife.ca.gov/Tax-Donation and at www.facebook.com/SeaOtterFundCDFW.

If someone else prepares your state tax return, please let him or her know you want to donate to the Rare and Endangered Species Preservation Program on line 403 and/or California Sea Otter Fund on line 410. If you have trouble finding California Contribution Funds in TurboTax, see these step-by-step instructions.

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Media Contacts:
Jeb Bjerke, Habitat Conservation Planning Branch (plants), (916) 651-6594
Esther Burkett, Nongame Wildlife Program, (916) 531-1594
Laird Henkel, Sea Otter Program, (831) 469-1726
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420