Klamath River Basin Salmon and Steelhead Fishing Reminders for 2020

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) would like to remind anglers that emergency regulations affecting spring Chinook salmon fishing in the Klamath River Basin were re-adopted by the California Fish and Game Commission effective December 2019.

Spring Chinook salmon: The emergency regulations listed in California Code of Regulations Title 14, subsection 7.50(b)(91.2) prohibit fishing for spring Chinook salmon in the Klamath River Basin from Jan. 1, 2020, through June 30, 2020. Chinook salmon fishing season will be open on the lower Klamath River between July 1 and Aug. 14, and on the upper Trinity River and New River between July 1 and Aug. 31. These emergency regulations supersede spring Chinook salmon fishing regulations found in the 2019-2020 California supplemental sport fishing regulations booklet.

Steelhead: Fishing for steelhead in the Klamath and Trinity rivers remains open year-round consistent with CCR Title 14, subsection 7.50(b)(91.1) in the 2019-2020 regulations booklet.

Fall Chinook salmon: The fall Chinook salmon season begins on Aug. 15, 2020, on the Klamath River and Sept. 1, 2020, on the Trinity River. Regulations pertaining to fall Chinook salmon fishing will be adopted in May 2020 and will include the annual basin quota, size, bag and possession limits, as noted on the Commission website.

Please consult the CDFW regulations web page or the Klamath River information hotline at (800) 564-6479 for further information pertaining to Klamath River Basin fishing seasons and regulations.

Media Contacts:
Dan Troxel, CDFW Klamath River Project, (707) 822-0330
Peter Tira, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

Angler holding north coast salmon

Fishing Report Cards Due Soon

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) reminds anglers that Jan. 31, 2020 is the due date for turning in steelhead, sturgeon and north coast salmon report card data.

Information collected from sport fishing report cards provides CDFW biologists with important data necessary to monitor and manage California’s diverse recreational fisheries, including preparing recommendations for sport fishing seasons and limits that allow for sustainable levels of take. This science-based management helps to ensure healthy populations of fish for future generations.

Anglers are required to return their report cards even if they lost their report card, they did not fish or they did not catch any fish. Cards should be reviewed carefully for accuracy prior to submission.

There are two ways to meet the mandatory angler reporting requirement. Online reporting through the CDFW website is easy, fast and free, and includes instant confirmation that the report has been received and accepted.

Sport fishing report cards may also be returned by mail to the addresses listed below:

  • North Coast Salmon Report Cards
    CDFW – Klamath River Project
    5341 Ericson Way
    Arcata, CA 95521-9269
  • Steelhead Report Cards
    CDFW – Steelhead Report Card
    P.O. Box 944209
    Sacramento, CA 94244-2090
  • Sturgeon Report Cards
    CDFW – Sturgeon Report Card
    P.O. Box 944209
    Sacramento, CA 94244-2090

The Jan. 31, 2020 deadline does not apply to spiny lobster report cards. Spiny lobster report cards are due by Apr. 30, 2020, following the last day of spiny lobster season on March 18.

Please note that license sales agents cannot accept report cards. More information about report cards is available at wildlife.ca.gov/licensing/fishing.

Media Contacts:
Xao Yang, CDFW License and Revenue Branch, (916) 928-5841

Tim Daly, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

Help Protect Steelhead Trout: Clean, Drain and Dry Fishing Gear to Prevent Spread of New Zealand Mudsnails

With the December 1st opening of steelhead trout fishing in coastal counties south of San Francisco, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) reminds anglers that it’s critically important to clean gear after every fishing outing. This practice helps prevent the spread of New Zealand mudsnails (NZMS), tiny (3/16”) aquatic snails capable of surviving out of water in the crevasses of damp gear for weeks.

The resiliency of NZMS has enabled them to spread to aquatic environments across the globe, including Europe, Australia, North America, and Asia. To prevent further spread, anglers and others who wade or work in California waters should thoroughly clean all gear before using it in another waterbody.

“While New Zealand mudsnails have been detected in watersheds across the state, many watersheds and counties remain free of this unwanted species. Anglers and the public are key to keeping these waters free of mudsnails,” said CDFW Senior Environmental Scientist George Neillands.

NZMS were first reported in California in 2000 in the Owens River (Inyo and Mono counties). In 2003, NZMS were discovered in northern California in Putah Creek (Yolo County) and the Mokelumne River (San Joaquin River). They have since been detected in one or more waterbodies in 27 additional counties (Alameda, Butte, Calaveras, Contra Costa, Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Los Angeles, Marin, Mendocino, Merced, Monterey, Napa, Orange, Sacramento, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Tehama, Ventura, and Yuba).

NZMS can survive in a variety of environments including rivers, streams, reservoirs and estuaries. They are parthenogenic live-bearers, meaning they self-reproduce. This enables a new population to begin from only one snail. NZMS have demonstrated the potential to reach high densities of up to nearly one million snails per square meter and comprising up to 95 percent of the invertebrate biomass of a river. When they reach high densities, NZMS outcompete native insects and invertebrates for space and algae, which reduces the forage available to steelhead trout. As a result, steelhead populations can decline. Once NZMS are established in a body of water, it may not be possible to eradicate them.

Here’s what you can do to prevent the spread of NZMS:

  • After leaving a body of water, inspect all gear including waders, boots and float tubes. Also inspect boats and trailers. Remove visible debris with a stiff brush and rinse on site.
  • Freeze waders and other gear overnight (for a minimum of six hours) or dry completely between use.
  • Use additional waders and boots in infested waters and store them separately.
  • Never transport live fish or other aquatic animals or plants from one waterbody to another.

For more information on NZMS visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/NZMS

Photo courtesy of U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Media Contacts:

George Neillands, CDFW Region 3 Fisheries, (707) 576-2812

Ken Paglia, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

Nominations Now Being Accepted for Fisheries Restoration Grant Program Peer Review Committee

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Fisheries Restoration Grant Program (FRGP) is seeking nominations to fill three vacancies on the FRGP Peer Review Committee (PRC).

Pursuant to the Public Resources Code, Section 6217.1, the 14 representatives of the PRC are appointed by the Director of CDFW to provide advice and oversight of, and recommend priorities for, grant funding under FRGP.

Seven of the PRC’s 14 representatives are recommended by the California Advisory Committee on Salmon and Steelhead Trout. Three representatives are County Supervisors from coastal counties recommended by California State Association of Counties.

The remaining four PRC seats represent the following interests: one representative from the agriculture industry, one representative from the timber industry, one representative of public water agency interests and one academic or research scientist with expertise in anadromous fisheries restoration.

The agriculture industry, timber industry and academic or research scientist seats are currently vacant, and CDFW is now accepting nominations from the general public for these seats through May 31, 2019. The appointed representatives serve four-year terms, and these appointments extend until January 2022, starting with the PRC meeting scheduled in the fall of 2019.

Representatives must reside in or represent interests in coastal and Central Valley counties in which native salmon and steelhead exist.

To nominate a representative for any of the above open seat, please email a nomination package to FRGP@wildlife.ca.gov, or send by mail to:

Timothy Chorey, FRGP Coordinator
California Department of Fish and Wildlife
Watershed Restoration Grants Branch
P.O. Box 944209
Sacramento, CA 94244-2090

Nomination packages must include a cover letter detailing the candidate’s qualifications, a resume of the candidate and verification that they represent coastal or Central Valley counties in which salmon and steelhead exist. For more information or any questions, please contact Matt Wells at (916) 445-1285 or FRGP@wildlife.ca.gov.

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Media Contacts:
Matt Wells, CDFW Watershed Restoration Grant Branch, (916) 445-1285

Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Stream Flow Enhancement Projects

The Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) has approved approximately $13 million in grants to help enhance flows in streams throughout California. A total of 11 stream flow enhancement projects were approved at an April 4 meeting of the Stream Flow Enhancement Program Board. The approved projects will provide or lead to a direct and measurable enhancement of the amount, timing and/or quality of water in streams for anadromous fish; special status, threatened, endangered or at-risk species; or to provide resilience to climate change.

Funding for these projects comes from the Water Quality, Supply and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014 (Proposition 1). The Act authorized the Legislature to appropriate funds to address the objectives identified in the California Water Action Plan, including more reliable water supplies, the restoration of important species and habitat, and a more resilient and sustainably managed water infrastructure.

Funded projects include:

      • A $499,955 grant to the University of California, Davis for a cooperative project with the University of California, Berkeley that will apply the newly developing California Environmental Flows Framework to inform decisions regarding instream flow enhancements in the Little Shasta River in Siskiyou County and San Juan Creek in Orange County, by defining target hydrologic regimes that meet ecological and geomorphic objectives.
      • A $1.5 million grant to the Sutter Butte Flood Control Agency for a cooperative project with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and California Department of Water Resources (DWR) in the Oroville Wildlife Area in Butte County. The project will reconnect the Feather River to approximately 400 acres of its historic floodplain, increasing the frequency and duration of floodplain inundation, and enhancing habitat for anadromous salmonids.
      • A $1.98 million grant to the Truckee River Watershed Council for a cooperative project with the CDFW, U.S. Forest Service, Tahoe National Forest and Bella Vista Foundation to enhance hydrologic and ecological function and improve base flows during the low flow period within Lower Perazzo Meadow in Sierra County.
      • A $621,754 grant to the San Mateo County Resource Conservation District for a cooperative project with DWR and State Coastal Conservancy to construct an off-channel storage pond on Klingman-Moty Farm. Combined with irrigation efficiency upgrades and a commitment from the landowner to forbear diversions during the low flow period, the project will improve instream flow conditions in San Gregorio Creek in San Mateo County.
      • A $1.78 million grant to the Ventura Resource Conservation District for a cooperative project with Ojai Valley Inn, the city of Ojai, the Thacher School, and a diverse array of other partners. They will develop an Integrated Water Management Framework for Instream Flow Enhancement and Water Security and complete planning, permitting and outreach to advance 25 stream flow enhancement projects to an implementation ready stage.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

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Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420