Category Archives: Regulations

Trinity River Upstream of Indian Creek Reopens for Adult Chinook Salmon Harvest on Monday, Nov. 19

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Trinity River Hatchery has determined the hatchery will have taken in more than 4,800 fall Chinook Salmon by the end of this week. According to California 2018-19 supplemental sport fishing regulations, the take of 4,800 fall Chinook Salmon at the hatchery triggers the reopening of the recreational Chinook Salmon fishery on the Upper Trinity River between the mouth of Indian Creek, near Weaverville, and Old Lewiston Bridge, at 12 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 19.

Recreational anglers will be able to harvest two Chinook Salmon, with no more than one adult greater than 22 inches, per day in this reach. The possession limit is six Chinook Salmon, and no more than three adults. Reopening this stretch of the Trinity River is designed to allow anglers to catch surplus hatchery Chinook Salmon now that the number of adults needed for spawning has been achieved at the hatchery.

The lower Trinity River, downstream of Hawkins Bar, and the upper Klamath River, upstream of I-5 near Hornbrook, are the other sections of the river that remain open to the take of adult Chinook Salmon. All other quota areas are closed to the take of adult Chinook Salmon. The take of jack salmon, those equal to or less than 22 inches, may be taken in all areas of the Klamath basin, with the exception of the mouth of the Klamath River, which is closed for the remainder of the year. The daily bag limit for jack salmon in these areas is two fish per day and no more than six in possession.

Anglers may monitor the quota status of open and closed sections of the Klamath and Trinity rivers by calling the information hotline at (800) 564-6479.

For more information regarding Klamath River fishing regulations, please consult the 2018-2019 California Freshwater and Supplemental Sport Fishing Regulations at wildlife.ca.gov/regulations.

CDFW and Partners Host Free Cannabis Permitting Workshops in Inland Empire

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) are hosting free cannabis permitting workshops in Palm Desert, Adelanto and Needles from December 4-6, 2018.

Workshops are open to cannabis cultivators, consultants and anyone interested in the topic.

The workshops include presentations from CDFW and SWRCB on the requirements and process of obtaining proper permits for cannabis grows. Workshop attendees will have time to talk with agency staff about individual projects. Representatives from the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s CalCannabis Cultivation Licensing Division and county permitting and planning departments will also be available to answer questions.

The workshops will be held on the following dates:

Tuesday, Dec. 4
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (presentations at 10:30 a.m.)
Coachella Valley Association of Governments
73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite 115
Palm Desert, Calif. 92260

Wednesday, Dec. 5
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (presentations at 10:30 a.m.)
Adelanto Stadium
12000 Stadium Way
Adelanto, Calif. 92301

Thursday, Dec. 6
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (presentations at 10:30 a.m.)
El Garces Room
950 Front Street
Needles, Calif. 92363

For more information, please visit CDFW’s cannabis program webpage at www.wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/cannabis and the SWRCB cannabis program webpage at www.waterboards.ca.gov/cannabis.

Media Contacts:
Heather McIntire, CDFW Cannabis Program, (707) 210-4415
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 895-3988

New Regulations for Commercial Dungeness Crab Fishery Effective Oct. 30, 2018

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) enacted new regulations to reduce the risk of marine life entanglements in commercial Dungeness crab fishing gear. These regulations became effective on October 30, 2018 and will be in place for the upcoming 2018-19 commercial Dungeness crab season.

Crab closeup

The new regulations allow no more than two trailer buoys to be used at the surface and establish a maximum distance between the front end of the main buoy to the tail end of the last trailer buoy depending on the depth that a trap is deployed. In depths less than or equal to 35 fathoms (210 feet), the distance should measure no more than 4 fathoms (24 feet), while at depths greater than 35 fathoms, the distance should measure no more than 6 fathoms (36 feet).

A diagram describing new surface gear regulations for the 2018-19 season can be found here.

crab

These regulations were developed with input from the California Dungeness Crab Fishing Gear Working Group (Working Group), a multi-stake holder group comprised of state and federal agency staff, fishermen and non-governmental organizations. The Working Group is tasked with evaluating options to reduce the risk of whale interactions with Dungeness crab fishing gear.

In addition to the new surface gear requirements, all recreational and commercial Dungeness crab fishermen are strongly encouraged to follow the Best Practices Guide developed by the Working Group to reduce the risk of marine life entanglements.

More information:
www.wildlife.ca.gov/crab

Media Contacts:
Christy Juhasz, CDFW Marine Region, (707) 576-2887
Jordan Traverso, CDFW Communications, (916) 212-7352

 

CDFW to Hold Public Meetings on Elk and Bighorn Sheep Environmental Documents

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), on behalf of the California Fish and Game Commission as Lead Agency pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act, is preparing draft environmental documents that address potential impacts resulting from the implementation of elk hunting regulations and bighorn sheep hunting regulations. Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines, section 15082(c), public scoping sessions will be held to identify potentially significant effects on the environment that may result from the proposed regulations, as well as any feasible mitigation measures that should be addressed in the draft environmental document.

Both meetings will be held Friday, Nov. 30, 2018 at the CDFW Wildlife Branch, 1812 Ninth St. in Sacramento (95811). The scoping meeting for elk will be held from noon to 1 p.m., and the scoping meeting for bighorn sheep will be held from 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Existing law (Fish and Game Code, section 3950) designates elk (genus Cervus) and bighorn sheep (subspecies Ovis canadensis nelsoni) as game mammals in California. Fish and Game Code, section 332 provides that the Fish and Game Commission may fix the area or areas, seasons and hours, bag and possession limit, sex and total number of elk that may be taken pursuant to its regulations. Fish and Game Code, section 4902 provides that the Commission may authorize sport hunting of mature Nelson bighorn rams.

State law (Fish and Game Code, section 207) requires the Commission to review mammal hunting regulations and CDFW to present recommendations for changes to the mammal hunting regulations to the Commission at a public meeting. Mammal hunting regulations adopted by the Commission provide for hunting elk and bighorn sheep in specific areas (hunt zones) of the state (California Code of Regulations Title 14, sections 362, 364 and 364.1). 

###

Media Contacts:
Victoria Barr, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-4034
Regina Vu, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-3728
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

 

Klamath River Upstream of Interstate 5 to Reopen to Adult Chinook Salmon Harvest on Monday, Oct. 29

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Iron Gate Hatchery has determined that the hatchery will have taken in more than 8,000 fall Chinook Salmon by the end of this week. According to California 2018-19 supplemental sport fishing regulations, the take of 8,000 fall Chinook Salmon at the hatchery triggers the reopening of the recreational Chinook Salmon fishery between Interstate 5, near Hornbrook, and 3,500 feet below the hatchery.

Recreational anglers will be able to harvest two Chinook Salmon, but no more than one adult greater than 22 inches, per day in this reach. The possession limit is six Chinook Salmon with no more than three adults. Reopening this stretch of the Klamath River is designed to allow anglers to catch surplus hatchery Chinook Salmon now that the number of adult needed for spawning has been achieved at the hatchery.

The lower Trinity River downstream of Hawkins Bar is the other section within the Klamath basin that remains open to the take of adult Chinook Salmon. All other quota areas are closed to the take of adult Chinook Salmon. The take of jack Chinook Salmon, equal to or less than 22 inches, may be taken in all areas of the Klamath basin, with the exception of the mouth of the Klamath River, which is closed for the remainder of the year. The daily bag limit for jack Chinook Salmon in these areas is two fish per day and no more than six in possession.

Anglers may monitor the quota status of open and closed sections of the Klamath and Trinity rivers by calling the information hotline at (800) 564-6479.

For more information regarding Klamath River fishing regulations, please consult the 2018-2019 California Freshwater and Supplemental sport fishing regulations at wildlife.ca.gov/regulations.

Media Contacts:
Dan Troxel, CDFW Northern Region, (707) 822-0330
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958