Category Archives: OSPR

Scientists Test Oil Spill Containment Equipment in Mission Bay

IMG_0391.JPGThe California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR) facilitated an exercise today to test response strategies aimed at protecting environmentally sensitive sites in the event of an oil spill near Mission Bay. 

As part of the exercise, OSPR personnel and local oil spill responders stretched 800 feet of orange containment boom across the channel leading into the bay from Mission Point to Hospitality Point. There was no reported spill. These were test procedures to tailor a response and refine the contingency plan to best prevent oil from reaching Mission Bay and the mouth of the San Diego River in the event of a spill. 

“Drills like this not only allow us to test these strategies in real-time conditions, but are also good practice opportunities for local oil spill responders,” said OSPR Environmental Scientist Kris Wiese. 

Factors such as tidal patterns, currents and weather conditions affect how well boom and other equipment works. Testing a strategy helps experts from OSPR determine whether it is likely to be successful in the event of a spill or needs to be altered. 

Pictures from today’s events are available on the OSPR Facebook page. 

Background

CDFW’s Sensitive Site Strategy Evaluation Program (SSSEP) evaluates strategies selected from more than 600 sites statewide that are particularly vulnerable to an oil spill. These areas are identified in Area Contingency Plans (ACPs) and are rich in sensitive resources such as fish, birds and marine mammals. Many also include habitat for wildlife breeding, nesting and feeding.

ACPs cover the entire coastline and marine waters of California and include the state’s busiest port areas: San Francisco Bay, Los Angeles/Long Beach and San Diego. More than 50 state, federal and local governments, as well as non-governmental organizations, industry and the general public contribute to ACP development.  

Media Contact: Eric Laughlin, OSPR Communications, (916) 214-3279

 

UPDATE: Cleanup operations ongoing after pipeline spill in Ventura

For Immediate Release
Unified Command

Ventura, Calif. – A multi-agency response continues to manage cleanup operations in the area impacted by a June 23 pipeline spill in Hall Canyon, Ventura.

On-scene crews include 98 responders, who have recovered a significant amount of pooled oil utilizing vacuum trucks. Cleanup operations are complex due to steep terrain.

Air monitoring is being continually conducted to assure safety of residents and responders in the area.

Two wood rats, one gopher snake, a raccoon and a rabbit were collected in the area and are being processed by the Oiled Wildlife Care Network for confirmation and identification. It has yet to be confirmed whether or not the deaths were linked to this incident. Specially trained wildlife personnel continue to work at deterring wildlife from entering the spill area and continue to search for oiled wildlife.

The cause of the spill is under investigation, and the investigation is separate from the unified command response. The unified command consists of representatives from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Crimson Pipeline, which has taken responsibility for the incident.

The public and media are advised to avoid the spill area and keep pets on leashes. In addition, they should not attempt to rescue any observed oiled wildlife. Untrained individuals who attempt to rescue wildlife may cause more harm than good and may injure themselves in the process.

The number to report oiled wildlife is 877 UCD-OWCN (823-6926).

Residents wishing to file a claim can do so via email at claims@crimsonpl.com or by calling 562-285-4128.

For the safety of residents and responders, motorists who do not live in the area are asked to avoid Hall Canyon Road.

For more information, visit http://www.wildlife.ca.gov/OSPR/CalSpillWatch

Contact: Eric Laughlin, Cal Fish and Wildlife, 916-214-3279
Matt Rezvani, Crimson Pipeline, 562-656-7392

Cleanup, air monitoring ongoing after pipeline spill in Ventura

For Immediate Release
Unified Command

Ventura, Calif. – A multi-agency response has been established to manage cleanup operations in the area impacted by a June 23 pipeline spill in Hall Canyon, Ventura.

There have been no oiled wildlife observed or reported, and no oil has reached the ocean or other water.

Cleanup crews remain on-scene containing and recovering the oil. Resources include 98 responders and five vacuum trucks. Air monitoring is being continually conducted to assure safety of responders and residents in the area.  

The cause of the spill is under investigation. The unified command response will be independent of that investigation and includes representatives from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Crimson Pipeline, which has taken responsibility for the incident.

The public and media are advised to avoid the impacted area and keep pets on leashes. In addition, they should not attempt to rescue any observed oiled wildlife. Untrained individuals who attempt to rescue wildlife may cause more harm than good and may injure themselves in the process.

The number to report oiled wildlife is 877 UCD-OWCN (823-6926).

Residents wishing to file a claim can do so via email at claims@crimsonpl.com or by calling 562-285-4128. 

For more information, visit http://www.wildlife.ca.gov/OSPR/CalSpillWatch

Contacts

Eric Laughlin, Cal Fish and Wildlife, 916-214-3279
Kendall Klingler, Crimson Pipeline, 314-574-1875

 

Butte County Receives Local Spill Response Equipment

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR) oversaw the delivery of oil spill response equipment and training for Butte County first responders today. Butte County is the fifth inland area awarded the spill equipment grant since OSPR expanded its preparedness activities statewide.

“This grant ensures Butte County is prepared in the event of an oil spill. Oroville is one community in the county with a long history of rail traffic with the potential for impacts to the nearby Feather River and Lake Oroville,” said OSPR’s Local Government Outreach and Grant Coordinator Cindy Murphy.

The Butte County Fire Department received the $30,000 grant that provides 1,000 feet of containment boom, absorbent materials, a mobile trailer, and eight hours of training. The equipment will strengthen oil spill preparedness and response at the Lower Feather River.

Today’s training included a four hour classroom instruction session, followed by four hours of on-water equipment deployment with spill response professionals.

OSPR began offering equipment grants in 2007 and it has since provided over $1 million to more than 40 local government agencies and tribes in California.

Equipment grants are available to any local public agency or tribe in the state. In order to be considered, agencies must be at risk of an oil spill occurring in their jurisdiction. The Response Equipment Grant Program webpage offers more information.

Siskiyou County Receives Equipment and Training for Oil Spill Response

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR) oversaw the delivery of oil spill response equipment and training for Siskiyou County first responders today. Siskiyou County is the fourth inland area awarded the spill equipment grant since OSPR expanded its preparedness activities statewide in 2014.

“For 25 years, we’ve protected the coast from oil spills. Now we want to bring the same level of protection to communities that have a long history of rail traffic and potential river impacts,” said OSPR’s Local Government Outreach and Grant Coordinator Scott Lipton. “It’s crucial that we all work together to protect these vital areas.”

Siskiyou County Environmental Health Department received the $30,000 grant that provides 1,000 feet of containment boom, absorbent materials, a mobile trailer and eight hours of training. The equipment will strengthen oil spill preparedness and response at the Upper Sacramento River.

Today’s training included a four -hour classroom instruction session, followed by four hours of on-water equipment deployment with spill response professionals.

“On behalf of Siskiyou County First Responders and the Upper Sacramento River Communities, we are grateful to OSPR and the people of the State to have been awarded this grant which will provide swift water oil response equipment and training to local personnel.  Siskiyou County is home of the head waters of the Sacramento River and its diverse habitat, we are very pleased to have these additional tools to help protect this crucial waterway.”

OSPR began offering equipment grants in 2007 and has since provided nearly $1 million to more than 40 local government agencies and tribes in California.

Equipment grants are available to any local public agency or tribe in the state. In order to be considered, agencies must be at risk of an oil spill occurring in their jurisdiction. The Response Equipment Grant Program webpage offers more information.

Media Contact:
Eric Laughlin, Public Information Officer, (916) 214-3279