Category Archives: Enforcement

California Rifle and Pistol Association Honors CDFW Assistant Chief Roy Griffith as Wildlife Officer of the Year

Asst. Chief Roy Griffith is honored by the California Rifle and Pistol Association
Asst. Chief Roy Griffith is honored by the California Rifle and Pistol Association

Since 2004, recently promoted Assistant Chief Roy Griffith of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has worked tirelessly to recruit and train new hunter education instructors from throughout California. During his 11 years as captain of California’s Hunter Education Program, the number of certified instructors rose from 300 to more than 1,000. The California Rifle and Pistol Association (CRPA) recently recognized these efforts by naming him as their 2014 Wildlife Officer of the Year.

Griffith began his wildlife officer career with CDFW in 1990, working in Southern California’s Chino District. He conducted extensive undercover operations as a member of the Special Operations Unit before changing his focus to the enforcement of laws related to habitat destruction. But he is best known for his role as captain of the Hunter Education Program, where his multi-generational approach and passion for “passing on the tradition” are evident to all who have worked with him.

When Griffith took the position of captain, California was experiencing a dramatic decline in the number of hunter education instructors. Griffith stepped up recruitment efforts, putting a special emphasis on bilingual outreach in order to reach prospective hunters who do not speak English as their first language. Now as Assistant Chief, Griffith continues to oversee the Hunter Education Program as part of his overall duties.

The all-volunteer cadre of hunter education instructors forms the framework for CDFW’s efforts to promote safe and ethical hunting to the next generation. The program includes annual re-certification of all 1,000 hunter education instructors. During the recertification, they learn the most current hunting and firearm safety training standards aligned with the state’s wildlife conservation needs and principles.

Hunter education instructors often volunteer for CDFW in many non-hunter education related venues, such as outdoor sporting shows, community events and anywhere else CDFW staff needs a hand.

Part of CRPA’s mission is to ensure proper management and respect for our state’s wildlife resources and to encourage public education concerning these resources. CRPA has regularly supported wildlife conservation, wildlife officers and hunting and firearms safety training statewide.

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Media Contacts:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 508-7095

Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

Poachers Take Advantage of Drought Conditions to Target Juvenile Salmon

California wildlife officers patrolling the Sacramento River recently cited six suspects for unlawfully taking and possessing juvenile salmon, and using the young fish as bait to target sturgeon. All of the suspects initially denied use of salmon as bait, but wildlife officers were able to reel in their lines and show them the dead salmon on their hooks.

The alleged poachers worked during the early morning hours under the cover of darkness and focused their effort on sandbars on the Sacramento River in Yolo and Sacramento counties. The sandbars were recently exposed due to drought conditions. Wildlife officers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Delta Bay Enhanced Enforcement Project (DBEEP), Special Operations Unit (SOU) and local squads continue to use the Governor’s drought overtime support to step up patrols in these sensitive areas to protect salmon and sturgeon from poachers.

In the first case, a wildlife officer observed two subjects wading in the Sacramento River and using a large net to capture juvenile salmon near a sandbar created by the low flow conditions. They netted the small salmon for later use as bait to fish for sturgeon. The wildlife officer ultimately determined that the two anglers and one more fisherman used fishing rods baited with the juvenile salmon they’d caught. Tony Saetern, 25, Michael Anglero, 24, and Kao Saeyang, 28, all of Sacramento, were each cited for unlawful use of salmon as bait and unlawful possession of salmon out of season.

A few nights later, wildlife officers observed a suspect using a hand light and dip net to unlawfully capture and keep multiple juvenile salmon in the same area of the Sacramento River. The officers watched as a total of three suspects in the group appeared to use the salmon as bait for fishing. Officers contacted the suspects and found two of them in possession of fishing rods with hooks baited with the salmon. As the officers were conducting the investigation, a sturgeon was hooked on another fishing rod belonging to the group, was landed and released. Officers found the group in possession of a Snapple beverage bottle containing 14 additional juvenile salmon for later use as bait.

Nai Poo Saechao, 36, of Antelope and Lai C Saechao, 27, of Sacramento, were both cited for unlawful use of salmon as bait, possession of salmon out of season and an overlimit of salmon. Vincent Sai Poo Saechao, 23, of Antelope, was cited for unlawful method of take of salmon.

“During this time of year, juvenile salmon are migrating downstream to the Delta and are vulnerable to this type of poaching as they seek shelter from prey fish close to shore,” DBEEP Warden Byron Trunnell explained. “Salmon season is closed on the Sacramento River, and nets are not an authorized method of take for game fish in inland waters.”

The unlawful practice of catching juvenile salmon for bait has long been a concern and is an enforcement priority this time of year. Poaching pressure on salmon is particularly harmful now, given California’s current drought situation. CDFW and numerous other agencies on both the state and federal levels are taking action wherever possible to support the long-term viability of salmon populations of the Sacramento River watershed.

CDFW appreciates legitimate anglers and asks for the public’s help in apprehending those who are taking advantage of our natural resources. Illegal activity can be reported through the CDFW Californians Turn In Poachers and Polluters (CalTIP) line at 888-334-2258, or via email or text (please see www.dfg.ca.gov/enforcement/caltip.aspx for details).

Media Contact:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 508-7095CDFW Wildlife Officer (2)

Six Wildlife Officers Receive Medal of Valor, California’s Highest Honor

Media Contacts:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 508-7095
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

Six wildlife officers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) were awarded the California Medal of Valor, the state’s highest honor, at a ceremony today. The six are among 52 state employees receiving the medal for demonstrating extraordinary acts of bravery and heroism in order to save the life of another.

Governor Brown’s Executive Secretary Nancy McFadden presented the awards.

“All of our officers are trained and ready to take on any challenge while working in a remote county, on a river or the ocean or patrolling in an aircraft,” said CDFW Chief of Law Enforcement David Bess. “The officers whose actions are being recognized represent the integrity of the entire CDFW force and we are very proud of them.”

There are more than 400 wildlife officers responsible for protecting California’s natural resources, often working alone on nights, weekends and holidays. They face many challenges as they enforce the laws relating to fish, wildlife and habitat within the state and its offshore waters.

The following officers are being recognized:

Crew of the Patrol Boat Bluefin
On Feb. 10, 1996, while patrolling waters off the Santa Cruz coastline aboard the department’s 65-foot patrol boat Bluefin, Lt. Doug Huckins (now retired), Wildlife Officers Gary Combes and John Ewald and U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer First Class Richard King, overheard a radio call about a capsized boat in the area.

After a 15-minute dash to the scene, they found the white hull of an overturned boat in the surf line and several people in 50 degree water, including two surfers who had paddled out to assist the victims. The crew could see the surfers taking turns holding up four of the five victims. Both surfers and victims were nearing exhaustion and waving frantically for help in the 12-foot waves.

With no real training on how to affect a rescue of that nature within the surf zone, the entire crew risked themselves to save lives.

Huckins backed the Bluefin just off the surf line, while Combes and Ewald launched a rigid-hull-inflatable skiff. They maneuvered into the surf zone riding the backs of the swells, and managed to pluck three of the victims from the water. They rushed them back to the Bluefin before returning to locate the other victims, but none were found. Huckins and King recognized that all three victims were in advanced stages of hypothermia after having struggled in the frigid waters for almost 45 minutes, and got the men into the crew’s survival suits for added warmth. The men were then airlifted by helicopter to a nearby hospital.

The two surfers had managed to get one victim to shore, but sadly a fifth victim drowned.

The rescued victims later visited Huckins. One of them told of becoming so exhausted he could no longer stay afloat – he sank once, then fought his way to the surface for what he knew would be his last breath, and as he began to sink for the last time, a wildlife officer’s hand came “out of nowhere” and pulled him to safety.

Wildlife Officer Kyle Kroll
On June 17, 2011, Wildlife Officer Kyle Kroll was patrolling the North Fork of the Feather River when he heard a 911 call over the county fire department radio. A vehicle had gone over a ledge and into the Feather River. Kroll was only five miles away and the nearest other rescue personnel were 45 minutes away.

Kroll arrived on scene and saw the vehicle was off a steep embankment and resting precariously on a rock in a section of the river with dangerous rapids. A severely injured husband and wife occupied the vehicle. Kroll determined he could not risk moving either passenger as the weight shift would have caused the vehicle to slip into the river. Kroll provided first aid and relayed pertinent information to emergency responders who were still many critical minutes away.

Kroll then secured the damaged vehicle with a tow strap and chain from his truck. He carefully waded into the swiftly moving river and attached them to the front and rear axles of the car. Assisted by a PG&E worker, Kroll tied the strap and chain to a tree and a rock in order to stabilize the vehicle and prevent it from falling into the river.

Rescue personnel and California Highway Patrol officers then arrived on scene. Because of the continued risk of the vehicle falling into the river, they provided Kroll with another chain, and he again went under the car and attached it to the axle, then to a tree. Only after securing additional straps and cables could the team work to extract the victims from the car and get them to safety.

Lt. Tony Spada
On July 24, 2013, Lt. Tony Spada was off-duty, riding his mountain bike on the south side of Ash Slough in Madera County. A woman ran from the bushes alongside the slough shouting, “My baby was swept away, help me!” Despite the fact he had no rescue equipment available, not even a life jacket, Spada dropped his bike, surveyed the scene and dove into the slough. He swam with the current approximately 50 to 70 yards downstream where he found two small girls hanging onto a branch to keep from being swept under a section of the slough with dense vegetation. Spada swam to their location and found it too difficult to rescue both children at the same time.

He located a safe exit point on the opposite side of the slough. Taking the smallest girl first, he placed her arms around his neck and proceeded to swim her across the slough to safety. He exited the waters, ran up stream and dove back into the water to rescue the second child in the same way.

Spada escorted the children over to officers of the Chowchilla Police Department who were waiting nearby. Both girls were treated for a mild case of hypothermia and shock.

Without Spada’s heroic actions, there is no doubt these two young girls would have lost their lives.

Wildlife Officer Arthur Golden
On Oct. 12, 2012, Wildlife Officer Arthur Golden was driving home from training when he came upon a vehicle accident near Corcoran. A small pickup truck had gone off the road and down a steep embankment.

A bystander reported that the victim was pinned in the vehicle and not breathing. Golden quickly checked on the driver, then radioed for help at his vehicle and went back down the hill to the heavily damaged vehicle. Inside, the driver was unconscious and bleeding. The truck was perched precariously on a slope and ready to slide down, potentially rolling over.

Putting himself in great jeopardy, Golden reached through the smashed driver’s side window to assess the victim’s injuries and provide immediate medical care. While Golden was half-inside the truck, it slid several inches down the hillside. Golden pulled the driver toward him to relieve the pressure on the downside truck door and stabilize the vehicle from rolling over onto both of them.

Shortly after, local fire and rescue arrived and fully extracted the man from the vehicle and got him to safety.

Video and high resolution photos of the wardens are available at ftp://ftp.dfg.ca.gov/oceo.

State, Federal and French Wildlife Officers Work Together to Stop Illegal Import

A San Jose woman has been served with a fine, community service and probation for possession of several taxidermied protected wildlife specimens and attempting to import a taxidermied protected owl from France.

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Dora Martha Jimenez Zepeda, 42, of San Jose pled no contest to one count of violating Fish and Game Code, section 3503.5, unlawful possession of birds of prey, and forfeited several other taxidermied animals that are illegal to possess in California. The plea disposition also resulted in a $3,600 fine to be paid into the Santa Clara County Fish and Wildlife Propagation Fund, 300 hours of community service and three years of probation.

“This is one of the most unusual cases we have seen in a while,” said California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Assistant Chief Bob Farrell. “The international trafficking of protected species usually falls under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, but since some of these animals were also protected under state law, it was a particularly complicated case. We appreciate the collaboration with our French and federal counterparts, as well as the Santa Clara District Attorney’s office, to bring this investigation to a close.”

In June 2014, CDFW law enforcement officers received a call through the CalTIP (Californians Turn in Poachers and Polluters) line from a wildlife officer at the National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage (the French National Hunting and Wildlife Office). The French officer had been investigating the unlawful sale of a barn owl (tyto alba) to a California buyer through eBay’s French website. The barn owl is a protected species in France.

After several months of investigation, CDFW wildlife officers, along with officers from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), located the suspect at her residence in San Jose.  Inside the one-bedroom apartment, officers found more than 50 stuffed and mounted animals, including a full-bodied African lion. Officers seized three species of hawk, two Western screech owls, one long-eared owl, two barn owls, one egret and one sea turtle, all prohibited species to possess.  She was allowed to keep the other mounts not prohibited by state or federal law.

The suspect stated she purchased most of her taxidermy from eBay and denied having killed any of the wildlife herself.

Nongame migratory birds such as birds of prey are protected under both California law and the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Sea turtles are federally protected under the Endangered Species Act and internationally under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

CalTIP is a confidential secret witness program that encourages the public to provide CDFW with factual information leading to the arrest of poachers and polluters. If you witness a poaching or polluting incident or any fish and wildlife violation, or have information about such a violation, please call 1-888-334-CALTIP (888-334-2258), 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Tipsters can also text anonymous information, including photographs, to the CalTIP program via “tip411” (numerically, 847411). Wildlife officers can respond directly, resulting in an anonymous two-way conversation.

Media Contacts:
Capt. Don Kelly, CDFW Law Enforcement Division, (831) 229-0903
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement Division, (916) 651-6692

owl

Euthanasia Drugs Reach the Wrong Animals

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has confirmed that several turkey vultures have been poisoned from the veterinary euthanasia drug pentobarbital in Marin County.

Six turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) were brought to the WildCare Wildlife Hospital in San Rafael between July and October 2014. All the birds were comatose and barely breathing, presenting a medical mystery to the wildlife hospital staff.

With immediate and intensive medical intervention all of the birds recovered, and digestive samples were sent to a laboratory to determine what made them sick. CDFW confirmed pentobarbital exposure in all birds tested, but the source of the exposure remains unknown.

Pentobarbital is a drug used by veterinarians to euthanize companion animals, livestock and horses. If the remains of animals euthanized with pentobarbital are not properly disposed of after death, scavenging wildlife – such as turkey vultures and eagles – can be poisoned. Veterinarians and animal owners are responsible for disposing of animal remains properly by legal methods such as cremation or deep burial.

Turkey vultures are protected by the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act and California Fish and Game Code. Improperly disposed-of euthanized remains are a danger to all scavenging wildlife.

Members of the veterinary and livestock communities are asked to share this information with colleagues in an effort to prevent further incidents.

WildCare also asks the public to pay attention to grounded turkey vultures and other raptors and scavengers.

Pentobarbital-poisoned birds appear to be dead. They have no reflex response and breathing can barely be detected. The birds appear intact, without wounds or obvious trauma. Anyone finding a comatose vulture should call WildCare’s 24-hour Hotline at (415) 456-SAVE (7283) immediately.

Read more about one pentobarbital-poisoned turkey vulture patient and the astonishing medical intervention required to save its life at http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/vulture. WildCare also has numerous photos and videos of the animals in care, as well as release footage.

Media Contacts:
Alison Hermance, WildCare, (415) 453-1000, ext. 24, alisonhermance@wildcarebayarea.org
Stella McMillin, CDFW Wildlife Investigations Lab, (916) 358-2954
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

CalTIP Pilot Program to Take Poaching and Pollution Tips Via Text Message and a New App

Media Contacts:
Lt. Mike Milotz, CDFW Law Enforcement and CalTIP Program, (916) 654-1485
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 651-6692

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has launched a pilot program that makes it easier for the public to report wildlife and pollution crimes with their cell phones.

Buckler 2007

Tipsters can now text anonymous information, including photographs, to the Californians Turn in Poachers and Polluters (CalTIP) program via “tip411” (numerically, 847411). Wildlife officers can respond directly, resulting in an anonymous two-way conversation.

Users must start the text message with the word “Caltip”.

Phone number line, type: 847411

Message line, type: Caltip (followed by the message/tip)

deadeagle

In conjunction with tip411 (847411), CDFW  is launching a CalTIP smartphone application which similarly enables the public to share an anonymous tip and/or photograph with wildlife officers and lets the officers converse anonymously with the tipster. The CalTIP App can be downloaded for free via the Google Play Store and iTunes App Store. Standard message and data rates may apply.

Anonymous tips can also be submitted right from CDFW’s website at www.dfg.ca.gov/enforcement/caltip.aspx.

Both the CALTIP App and tip411 are completely anonymous, as the technology removes all identifying information before wildlife officers see the tips.

“We believe the public is our greatest law enforcement resource,” said CDFW Lt. Michael Milotz, CalTIP coordinator. “Tip411 and the CalTIP App will give us another tool to combat pollution and the unlawful take and commercialization of California’s wildlife.”

During the two-month pilot period, CDFW will collect usage data to help determine whether tip411 and the CalTIP App will be permanently added to the CalTIP program.

CalTIP is a confidential secret witness program that encourages the public to provide factual information leading to the arrest of poachers and polluters. The program is funded by penalty assessments generated by fines from wildlife violators and polluters. The existing CalTIP confidential secret witness phone number, 1-888-334-2258, will remain operational 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Wildlife officers encourage anyone who witnesses a poaching or polluting violation, or who has information about a violation, to report it using any means available.

CDFW to Showcase Programs, Sell Licenses and Offer Education for Kids at Upcoming ISE Show in Sacramento

If you’re heading to the International Sportsmen’s Expo at the Cal Expo State Fairgrounds this coming weekend (Jan. 8-11), be sure to stop by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) booth, space 3700 in the Pavilion Building. Wardens, biologists, license agents and many other CDFW staff will be on hand throughout the event to address questions and provide information. Many items will also be available for purchase, including fishing and hunting licenses, warden stamps, permits and tags.

License sales at Sacramento ISE

For the second year, CDFW’s top leadership will participate in a panel discussion about topics of interest to California hunters and anglers. The discussion will be held Saturday, Jan. 10 from 1-2 p.m. in the California Sportsmen’s Theater in the Pavilion Building. This will be an open forum where members of the audience may ask questions of the panel.

“As public servants, it is part of our job to remain open and available for input on issues, including contentious ones,” said Charlton H. Bonham, CDFW’s Director. “It is particularly important that we listen to input from our traditional hunting and fishing constituents. This show gives us an opportunity to do just that.”

CDFW will also have other displays throughout the fairgrounds, including the Heritage Wild Trout booth, space 2218 in the Fly Fishing Building, and an invasive species booth, space 3244 in the Pavilion Building. Game warden recruitment is always a large component of CDFW’s participation in the show. Again this year, a game warden trailer with a free laser shot game will be on display outside of the Pavilion Building, and wildlife officers will be available to answer questions about employment with CDFW.

Other CDFW-sponsored highlights at the ISE include:

  • Youth fishing – Bring your child to the Youth Fair Expo Center to fish for beautiful rainbow trout. Each person who does so will go home with an official California Fishing Passport book, an official stamp and a fish identification book containing pictures and information about 150 different species of California fish!
  • Learn How to be “Bear Aware” – CDFW staff will demonstrate how to keep a campsite safe from unwanted ursine visitors.
  • 2015 Warden Stamps – At the main booth, CDFW will be offering and promoting this year’s stamp, which features a black bear. Stamps sell for $5. Proceeds support game wardens and K-9 units and help fund the purchase of necessary law enforcement equipment.
  • Outdoor California – Free copies of CDFW’s award-winning magazine will be available (as supplies last) at the main booth. Yearly subscriptions may be purchased for $15.
  • New This Year … CDFW’s First Trout Planting Truck – This beautiful 1925 Dodge truck was the first used for planting trout. The fish were transported in big milk cans. It has been completely refurbished and will be on display for the first time at this Sacramento show, near the Youth Fair Expo Center. It still runs and it looks like it just rolled off the showroom floor.

The Cal Expo State Fairgrounds are located at 1600 Exposition Blvd. in Sacramento. ISE show hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday and Friday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday; and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $15 for adults (door sales are cash only, although tickets may be purchased in advance online). Youth under age 16 are free. There is a $10 charge to park on the grounds.

For additional information, schedules and to purchase tickets, please visit the ISE webpage at www.sportsexpos.com/attend/2015/sacramento.

Amador County Man Sentenced for Poaching

Media Contacts:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement Division, (916) 651-6692
Amador County Deputy District Attorney Stephanie Mello, (209) 223-6444

A Plymouth man was convicted in Amador Superior Court of multiple deer poaching charges.

Gary Michael Creason Jr., age 24, was fined $19,520 for activities involving the take of trophy deer out of season, among other charges. Trophy bucks are described as male deer with very large antlers.

Acting on a tip, wildlife officers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) contacted Creason at his home in July 2013, where they found him in possession of several sets of trophy deer antlers and deer meat. Creason admitted to taking deer out of season, using another person’s tag and admitted to pursuing trophy bucks outside the hunting season. In 2012, Governor Brown signed Assembly Bill (AB) 1162 (Chesbro) that increased the penalties associated with killing trophy game animals out of season.

“Poaching deer during the mating season when hunting season is closed is a common tactic of poachers,” said CDFW Lt. Stacey LaFave, supervisor for Alpine, Amador and El Dorado counties. “Bucks have a reduced awareness of their surroundings and become very susceptible to this type of illegal activity.”

The $19,520 fine was on top of three years of probation, loss of all hunting privileges during that timeframe and forfeiture of all wildlife evidence seized.

AB 1162 established a criminal penalty for any person who knowingly and illegally takes a trophy deer outside the legal hunting season. The penalty for such offense shall be not less than $5,000 nor more than $40,000 or up to one year in county jail, or both the fine and imprisonment. The bill was sponsored by an organization of hunters to deter poachers from illegally targeting very large game animals.

Equine Partners Saddle Up to Help Protect California’s Natural Resources

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Media Contact:
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

Wildlife officers at the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) are turning to an age-old enforcement tool – the horse – to help protect California’s natural resources.

While there is no formal mounted patrol unit, some wildlife officers are using their own personal horses for routine patrol in the back country. Much like canine partners, horses can see, hear and go places faster and quieter than modern technology. Covering up to 20 miles a day, equine patrols can show up where you least expect them, even in the most adverse conditions.

“As a 25-year law enforcement professional, I have used a variety of tools in my career and my six-year old mustang is by far, one of the most practical resources at my disposal,” said CDFW Wildlife Officer Jerry Karnow. “I can cover many miles a day in locations not accessible by any vehicle, which includes a huge portion of California’s outback. As a mounted unit, I have confiscated illegal firearms, helped hikers find their way, put out illegal campfires and made arrests in crimes that would otherwise go unnoticed.”

Karnow’s equine partner, Modoc, is a former wild mustang from Lassen County who was rounded up by the Bureau of Land Management. At two years of age, Modoc entered the wild horse program at a correctional facility in Carson City. Mustangs in the program are tamed, socialized and ridden for the first time by inmates. Wild horses have a keen sense of awareness from living as a prey species, which is needed for their survival from day one. They can hear, see and sense activity at a longer distance well before a human ear or eye can detect it, making them solid enforcement partners.

“Protecting California’s precious natural resources all comes down to boots on the ground, which includes covering large areas of rough terrain,” said CDFW Wildlife Officer Gary Densford. “Utilizing horses makes perfect sense for the duties and work of a wildlife officer in the back country.”

All horses used for patrol must be sound, reliable and in good working condition. Each horse and rider is observed yearly to ensure the equine under saddle is sound and trail ready. All horse units are maintained in a healthy, groomed condition and shall not be ridden on patrol without appropriate hoof care.

CDFW is currently utilizing a handful of units with more interest on the rise.

Inyo County Man Arrested, Charged with Poaching Deer

Media Contacts:
Lt. Bill Dailey, CDFW Law Enforcement Division, (661) 203-6380
Lt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement Division, (916) 508-7095

dog
Tracking dog Sieger helped wildlife officers locate a poached trophy deer.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) officers arrested a poacher today in Inyo County for allegedly illegally killing a trophy 3×3 deer in the G-3 zone. Joseph Eugene Bragdon, 37, of Bishop was taken into custody without incident at his workplace after a $15,000 arrest warrant was issued by the Inyo County District Attorney’s Office.

“We are grateful to the Inyo County DA’s Office for recognizing the importance of resource protection and that wildlife poaching is a serious crime,” said Lt. Bill Dailey of CDFW’s Law Enforcement Division. “Ethical hunters prize the G-3 tag for the incredible landscape and quantity of large deer. With only 35 tags issued every year, hunters can apply for years and never draw this zone.”

CDFW wildlife officers received a tip, through the CalTIP hotline, that on Nov. 1 Bragdon took his juvenile son to Division Creek in the trophy G-3 hunting zone and killed a large mule deer buck using a D-7 deer zone tag. With the assistance of the investigating warden’s tracking dog, Sieger, they located a dead deer with only the antlers and part of the edible meat removed. Most of the animal was left to waste.

Poaching a deer, cutting the head off and wasting edible meat is illegal and an egregious violation of ethical hunting standards. Wildlife officers took DNA samples and seized ballistic evidence.

The G-3 deer season runs only from Dec. 6-21. This area is considered a trophy deer hunt when high country mule deer bucks enter the area to escape the high country winter storms.

In November 2012, Bragdon was convicted of two misdemeanor hunting violations in Nevada, including hunting big game in a closed season and hunting big game without a tag. He was fined and had demerit points added to his Nevada hunting license.

Bragdon faces possible charges for several violations of the Fish and Game Code, including taking a deer without a license, tag or permit, failure to fill out tags, waste of game, failure to have a tag in possession and possession of less than an ounce of marijuana. If convicted, Bragdon could face revocation of his hunting license, fines, probation and/or jail time.

CalTIP (Californians Turn In Poachers and Polluters) is a confidential secret witness program that encourages the public to provide CDFW with factual information leading to the arrest of poachers and polluters. Ethical hunters and anglers are the most common contributors to the CalTIP hotline. The toll-free hotline number is (888) 334-2258.

Tracking dog Sieger is a candidate for the next cycle of certification training for CDFW’s exceptional team of Warden K-9s.