July 2020 California Department of Fish and Wildlife Calendar

All calendar items are subject to change as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic.

Various Days — Sign Up for Environmental Response to Oil Spills (EROS) Course. This free three-day course will be held October 13-15, 2020 at the Granite Bay Activity Center in Granite Bay. It is provided to new oil spill responders and consists of demonstrations, lectures by experienced response personnel, case studies and interactive field trips. Applications are due Aug. 1. For more information and to register, please contact Lea Gibson at (916) 215-5581 or lea.gibson@wildlife.ca.gov. Please include your name, contact information and oil spill response role.

1 — Recreational Chinook Salmon Season to Open on Portions of Klamath and Trinity Rivers. Emergency fishing regulations for the spring Chinook salmon fishery in the Klamath River Basin have been extended. The spring Chinook salmon fishery on the lower Klamath River (downstream of the Highway 96 bridge at Weitchpec) and Trinity River (upstream of the confluence of the South Fork Trinity River) will open July 1 and run through Aug. 14 on the Klamath River and through Aug. 31 on the Trinity River. The daily bag limit has been set to one Chinook salmon (no size restrictions), and the possession limit set at two Chinook salmon. Please see the 2020-2021 California Freshwater Sportfishing Regulations and 2020-2021 California Supplement Sport Fishing Regulations for more information.

1 — General Season for Rabbits and Varying Hare Opens Statewide (Extending through Jan. 31, 2021). For more information on small game seasons and limits, please visit wildlife.ca.gov/hunting/small-game.

1 — Dungeness Crab Sport Fishing Season Closed in the San Francisco and Central Management Areas (South of Mendocino County). For more information, please visit wildlife.ca.gov/crabs.

4 — Free Fishing Day. One of two Free Fishing Days being offered by CDFW in 2020 is scheduled July 4 (the other is Sept. 5). While all fishing regulations – such as bag and size limits, gear restrictions, report card requirements, fishing hours and stream closures – remain in effect, anyone can fish without purchasing a fishing license on Free Fishing Days. For more information, please visit wildlife.ca.gov/licensing/fishing/free-fishing-days.

4 — Weaving Yesterday’s History Series Virtual Event, 1 to 1:30 p.m. Reserve naturalists and historians will host a Facebook Live series exploring the cultural heritage of Elkhorn Slough. Held on the first Saturday of every month, each event features the backstory on a different location around the slough. Please visit www.elkhornslough.org/events/weaving-yesterdays-a-live-history-series to view the series’ schedule and find recordings of previous installments.

9 — California Wildlife Conservation Board Stream Flow Enhancement Program Proposal Solicitation Notice Opens. Program priorities include enhancing flow in streams that support anadromous fish, supporting special status species and providing resilience to climate change. Please visit wcb.ca.gov/programs/stream-flow-enhancement for more information.

16 — Recreational Chinook Salmon Season to Open in Central Valley. The season will open on portions of the American, Feather, Mokelumne and Sacramento rivers. For full information on open waters and limits, please see the 2020-2021 California Freshwater Sportfishing Regulations and 2020-2021 California Supplement Sport Fishing Regulations. The season will open on the Sacramento River from the Deschutes Road bridge to the Red Bluff Diversion Dam on Aug. 1.

24 — Shared Habitat Alliance for Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Access Permit Application Deadline for Elk Hunting Opportunities. An $11.50 non-refundable application fee (plus handling fees) is charged for each hunt choice. For more information, please visit wildlife.ca.gov/hunting/share.

29 — California Fish and Game Commission Marine Resources Committee Meeting, time to be determined. This meeting was originally planned to take place in San Clemente but is expected to be held via webinar/teleconference due to health and safety concerns related to COVID-19. For more information, please visit fgc.ca.gov.

30 — Last Day of Dungeness Crab Sport Fishing Season in Mendocino, Humboldt and Del Norte Counties. For more information, please visit wildlife.ca.gov/crabs.

31 — California Wildlife Conservation Board Lower American River Conservancy Program 2020 Proposal Solicitation Notice Closes, 5 p.m. Please visit wcb.ca.gov/programs/lower-american-river for more information.

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Media Contact:
Amanda McDermott, CDFW Communications, (916) 817-0434

Gray Lodge Auto Tour Loop to Close for Summer Repairs; New Fishing Pier to Be Built

Improvements are coming to the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area in Butte County.

Hosting some 80,000 visitors each year, Gray Lodge is one of the most heavily visited and used wildlife areas in the state, and construction work will restrict some public access over the next several months.

Work is scheduled to begin the week of June 15, 2020, on the auto tour loop on the west side of the wildlife area near Parking Lot 14. The auto tour loop and some nearby hiking trails will be closed during this construction period, which is expected to conclude around the first week in October, reopening in time for bird watching during peak fall and winter migrations.

Crews will regrade the steep slopes on the auto tour roadway to improve safety and add additional turnouts for wildlife viewing and passing. The pond bottoms along the auto tour loop will be reshaped to improve water movement and habitat management. The work is being funded through a $1.4 million grant from the state Wildlife Conservation Board.

Over this same period, crews will also construct a mobility impaired fishing pier on the pond adjacent to Parking Lot 14 thanks to another $310,000 Wildlife Conservation Board grant. The pier will provide fishing access to the public throughout the spring and summer months when the wildlife area is open to fishing. For questions or additional information, please contact Gray Lodge directly at (530) 846-7500.

CDFW reminds Californians to abide by all state and local health guidelines regarding non-essential travel and physical distancing.

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Media Contacts:
Peter Tira, CDFW Communications, (916) 215-3858

Dave VanBaren, CDFW North Central Region, (530) 846-7500

CDFW Photo: The view from the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area auto tour loop.

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

At its May 20, 2020 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $36.2 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 31 approved projects will benefit fish and wildlife — including some endangered species — while others will provide public access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, landowners and the local community.

Funding for these projects comes from a combination of sources including the Habitat Conservation Fund and bond measures approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources.

Funded projects include:

  • A $343,000 grant to The Nature Conservancy for a cooperative project with the National Park Service and the California Institute of Environmental Studies to restore approximately three acres of migratory bird breeding habitat on Anacapa Island in the Channel Islands National Park off the coast of Port Hueneme in Ventura County.
  • A $635,000 grant to the Trust for Public Land for a cooperative project with the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority and the San Fernando Valley Audubon Society to acquire approximately 22 acres of land for the protection of threatened and endangered species and riparian and floodplain habitat along the Santa Clara River and to provide the potential for wildlife-oriented, public-use opportunities near Acton in Los Angeles County.
  • A $1.3 million grant to Truckee Donner Land Trust to acquire in fee approximately 201 acres to preserve montane meadow, wildlife corridors and habitat linkages, and to provide wildlife-oriented, public-use opportunities near Truckee in Nevada County.
  • A $4.7 million grant to Tuolumne County for a cooperative project with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), CAL FIRE, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Forest Service to enhance forest health and reduce hazardous fuels through selective thinning and replanting activities on approximately 6,434 acres of mixed conifer forest in the Tuolumne River watershed located in Stanislaus National Forest 20 miles east of Sonora in Tuolumne County.
  • A $1.25 million grant to Port San Luis Obispo Harbor District for a cooperative project with California State Parks to rehabilitate a pier and boat landing at Avila Pier located approximately eight miles northwest of Pismo Beach in San Luis Obispo County.
  • A $689,000 grant to Bolsa Chica Conservancy for a cooperative project with Signal Landmark, Pacific Life Foundation and CDFW to install new portable buildings for an interpretive center and construct educational features, an Americans with Disabilities Act accessible observation desk and restrooms in the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve approximately four miles northeast of Huntington Beach in Orange County.
  • A $10 million grant to Santa Clara Valley Open Space Authority for a cooperative project with the Peninsula Open Space Trust and State Coastal Conservancy to acquire in fee approximately 235 acres of land to protect a critical linkage both for movement of wildlife and for species adaptation to climate change, and the protection of a natural floodplain located in Coyote Valley in Santa Clara County.
  • A $5 million grant to the Ventura County Watershed Protection District for a planning project that will complete final design plans for Matilija Dam removal and for three downstream levee construction/rehabilitation projects as essential components of the Matilija Dam Ecosystem Restoration Project, a watershed-scale dam removal initiative and one of California’s largest dam removal efforts located five miles northwest of Ojai in Ventura County.

For more information about the WCB please visit wcb.ca.gov.

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Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB, (916) 445-0137
Amanda McDermott, CDFW Communications, (916) 817-0434

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Stream Flow Enhancement Projects

The Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) has approved approximately $24.3 million in grants to help enhance flows in streams throughout California. A total of 19 stream flow enhancement projects were approved for funding at its April 1 meeting. The approved projects will provide or lead to a direct and measurable enhancement of the amount, timing and/or quality of water in streams for anadromous fish or special status, threatened, endangered or at-risk species, or to provide resilience to climate change. 

Funding for these projects comes from the Water Quality, Supply and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014 (Proposition 1). The Act authorized the Legislature to appropriate funds to address the objectives identified in the California Water Action Plan, including more reliable water supplies, the restoration of important species and habitat, and a more resilient and sustainably managed water infrastructure. 

Funded projects include: 

  • A $299,185 grant to Creek Lands Conservation for a cooperative project with Watershed Progressive, Eagle Aerial and Hicks Law to identify and analyze opportunities to enhance stream flow throughout the Ventura River watershed in Ventura County. The project will assess water demand, infiltration and opportunities for reduced consumptive use in order to prioritize parcels that have the highest potential to enhance stream flow.
  • A $3.8 million grant to California Trout for a cooperative project with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on the Cardoza Ranch in Siskiyou County. The project will enhance flows in Parks Creek, a tributary to the Shasta River, and restore critical spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead throughout the watershed.
  • A $689,618 grant to Trout Unlimited to acquire the water rights on lower Battle Creek in Tehama County. The project will dedicate water rights to instream flow in the lower 7.3 miles of Battle Creek to restore dwindling Chinook salmon and steelhead runs and enhance wetlands on private lands managed as part of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
  • A $1.52 million grant to the North Coast Resource Conservation and Development Council for a cooperative project with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Alliance Redwoods Conference Grounds (ARCG) along the mainstem of Dutch Bill Creek in Sonoma County. The project will improve dry season stream flows in Dutch Bill Creek from May to October for the benefit of listed salmonids and aquatic habitat by addressing water use and water sources at the ARCG.
  • A $495,291 grant to Trout Unlimited for a cooperative project with Peter Marchi of Marchi and Son Farm to increase stream flow in San Gregorio Creek in San Mateo County during critically low flow months to improve passage and rearing conditions for anadromous fish. With the addition of Marchi and Son Farm, all commercial farms in the lower San Gregorio Creek will have implemented irrigation efficiency measures and be committed to 20 years of diversion forbearance during the dry season.
  • A $3.94 million grant to The Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County for a cooperative project with Hicks Law and The Conservation Fund to acquire ownership of the Santa Rita Ranch and associated water rights in San Luis Obispo County. The project will conserve approximately 1,715 acres of intact wildlife habitat and includes the headwaters of Santa Rita Creek and Hartzell Dam. The entirety of the water rights will be dedicated to instream flow for the benefit of fish and wildlife, wetland habitat and riparian habitat restoration.

For more information about the WCB please visit wcb.ca.gov

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Media Contacts: 
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137 
Amanda McDermott, CDFW Communications, (916) 817-0434

Eroded streambank at Ackerson Meadow

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

At its Feb. 26, 2020 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $33.2 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 41 approved projects will benefit fish and wildlife — including some endangered species — while others will provide public access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, landowners and the local community.

Funding for these projects comes from a combination of sources including the Habitat Conservation Fund and bond measures approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources.

Funded projects include:

  • A $275,000 grant to American Rivers, Inc. for a cooperative project with Yosemite National Park and Stanislaus National Forest to complete environmental compliance, planning and permitting to restore approximately 230 acres of mountain meadow at three sites: one in Yosemite National Park, one in the Stanislaus National Forest and one managed by both the National Park Service and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) agencies in Tuolumne County.
  • A $300,000 grant to Land Trust of Santa Cruz County for a cooperative project with the State Coastal Conservancy to plan, design and permit trails, boardwalks, and fishing and boating access at Watsonville Slough Farm located adjacent to the city of Watsonville in Santa Cruz County.
  • A $1.21 million grant to River Partners for a cooperative project with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and Kern River Corridor Endowment and Holding Company that will plant milkweed and nectar-rich plants to establish or enhance monarch butterfly habitat on approximately 600 acres of natural lands in the Sacramento Valley, San Joaquin Valley and San Diego region.
  • A $1.93 million grant to Calaveras Healthy Impact Product Solutions for a cooperative project with the USFS and Upper Mokelumne River Watershed Authority to enhance forest health and reduce hazardous fuels through selective thinning, prescribed fire and replanting activities on approximately 1,915 acres of mixed conifer forest in Eldorado National Forest in Amador County.
  • A $2.5 million grant to the Monterey County Resource Management Agency for a cooperative project with the State Coastal Conservancy, California State Parks, California Department of Transportation, California Department of Water Resources and Big Sur Land Trust to restore approximately 135 acres on the lower floodplain of the Carmel River located approximately one mile south of the city of Carmel-by-the-Sea in Monterey County.
  • A $2.32 million grant to the Trust for Public Land for a cooperative project with the California Natural Resources Agency’s Environmental Enhancement and Mitigation Program, National Audubon Society, Sierra Nevada Conservancy, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Kern River Valley Heritage Foundation to acquire approximately 3,804 acres of land for the protection of threatened and endangered species, wildlife corridors, habitat linkages and watersheds, and to provide wildlife-oriented, public-use opportunities near Weldon in Kern County.
  • A $1 million grant to the Mountains Recreation Conservation Authority (MRCA) and the acceptance of a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Conservation Plan Land Acquisition Grant, and the approval to subgrant these federal funds to MRCA to acquire, in fee, approximately 320 acres of land for the protection of a core population of coastal California gnatcatcher, the coastal cactus wren and other sensitive species located near Chino Hills in San Bernardino County.
  • $6.33 million from the USFWS Habitat Conservation Plan Land Acquisition Grant and approval to subgrant these federal funds to the Endangered Habitats Conservancy (EHC), and a WCB grant to the EHC for a cooperative project with the federal government, acting by and through the U.S. Navy to acquire, in fee, approximately 955 acres of land for the protection of grasslands, oak woodlands, coastal sage scrub and vernal pools that support threatened and endangered species and to support the preservation of wildlife corridors and linkages, located in the community of Ramona in San Diego County.

For more information about the WCB visit wcb.ca.gov.

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Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Amanda McDermott, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8907