Fisheries Agencies Report Positive Outlook for 2015 Ocean Salmon Fishing Season

Media Contacts:
Jennifer Simon, CDFW Ocean Salmon Project, (707) 576-2878

Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

At the annual salmon informational meeting held in Santa Rosa today, state and federal fishery scientists presented encouraging news for sport and commercial salmon anglers. Forecasts suggest there are 652,000 adult Sacramento River fall Chinook salmon in the ocean this year, along with 423,800 adults from the Klamath River fall run. Fish from these runs comprise the vast majority of salmon taken in California’s ocean and inland fisheries.

James Phillips holding a Chinook salmon
CDFW Environmental Scientist and Ocean Salmon Project team member James Phillips, holding a Chinook salmon. CDFW photo by Kristie Amtoft.

These forecasts, which were higher than last year, will be used over the next few months by fishery managers to set sport and commercial fishing season dates, commercial quotas, and size and bag limits.

“The forecasts are encouraging and suggest that California fisheries may see salmon seasons in 2015 that have increased opportunities over last year,” said Melodie Palmer-Zwahlen, a senior environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Chinook salmon that will be harvested in ocean fisheries in 2015 hatched 2-4 years ago and, as a result, have not been highly impacted by California’s drought. Starting next year, it is anticipated that future ocean salmon fishing opportunities may be impacted by the ongoing drought.

Season dates and other regulations will be developed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council and California Fish and Game Commission over the next few months. For more information on the salmon season setting process or general ocean salmon fishing information, please visit the Ocean Salmon Project website at www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/oceansalmon.asp, or call the salmon fishing hotline at (707) 576-3429.

North Coast Anglers Could be Rewarded for Returning Fish Tags in Timely Manner

Media Contacts:
Mary Claire Kier, CDFW Klamath/Trinity River Project, (707) 822-5876
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

Successful north coast steelhead and salmon anglers could catch a $10-50 reward for returning their fish tags this season. Of the more than 4,500 fish that were tagged, 3,000 are eligible for a cash reward.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) uses information gathered from the tags applied to Chinook, coho and steelhead in the Trinity River system to calculate harvest and help biologists estimate population size of steelhead and salmon runs. Only tags returned to CDFW in the same season they are obtained can be used in estimates. The timely return of tags to CDFW is critical because the data is also needed for the annual season setting process.

Reward tags are clearly marked, though any tag returned is appreciated. The information non-reward tags is equally important to the process.  When the tag is returned, CDFW will send you information about where and when your fish was tagged, in addition to any reward for which you might qualify.

Anglers can download the tag return form at dfg.ca.gov/fish/Fishing/Monitoring/FTag/. 

Tags should be taped to the completed form and returned to:

CDFW – TRP
5341 Ericson Way
Arcata, CA  95521

Please remove the knot from the tag to ensure your envelope makes it through the USPS mail sorting process intact.

Tags need to be received by about the end of April, but the sooner the better for the Chinook tags. For additional information, please contact Mary Claire Kier at TRP@wildlife.ca.gov.

 

March 2015 California Department of Fish and Wildlife Calendar

Media Contact:
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

DATE — EVENT

Various Days — Guided Wetland Tours, By Reservation, at Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, 3207 Rutherford Road, Gridley (95948). A wildlife naturalist will lead your group, school or organization through the diverse wetlands of the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area. General information includes wildlife identification, behavior patterns and conservation efforts. Your experience can be catered to include requested information, along a half-mile walking route. The minimum group size is 18 people. For more information, please call (530) 846-7505 or email lori.dieter@wildlife.ca.gov.

Weekends — Elkhorn Slough Ecological Reserve. Docent-led walks are scheduled every Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Binoculars and bird books are available for the public to borrow at no cost. The visitor center and main overlook are fully accessible. Day use fee is $4.32 per person, ages 16 and older. Groups of 10 or more should schedule a separate tour. For more information, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/lands/er/region4/elkhorn.html.

Every Monday (except holidays)Volunteer Stewardship Field Crew Mondays at Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve,1700 Elkhorn Road, Royal Oaks (95076), 10 a.m. to noon. Help preserve natural habitat by collecting seeds, planting, and helping to maintain trails and weeding introduced species. For more information, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/lands/er/region4/elkhorn.html or email www.elkhornslough.org.

Weekends — Sandhill Crane Wetland Tour at the Woodbridge Ecological Reserve. CDFW public tours are available to view greater and lesser sandhill cranes at Woodbridge Ecological Reserve outside of Lodi, W Woodbridge Road (95242). Tour registration is posted six weeks in advance. For more information about tour times during the first three weekends of the fall and winter months, please visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/regions/3/crane-tour.

1 — Recreational Groundfish Season is Open for All Boat-based Anglers in the Southern Groundfish Management Area (Point Conception, Santa Barbara County to the California/Mexico border) on March 1, 2015. For more information please visit the Groundfish Central webpage at: www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/groundfishcentral.

4 — California Fish and Game Commission Marine Resources Committee Meeting, 12:30 p.m. Monterey County Library, Marina Branch, 190 Seaside Circle, Marina (93933). For more information, please visit www.fgc.ca.gov/meetings/2015/index.aspx.

4-8 — Fred Hall Fishing, Tackle and Boat Show, Long Beach Convention Center, 300 East Ocean Blvd., Long Beach (90802). Visit the CDFW booth to ask questions and purchase licenses, tags and report cards. The new 2015 CDFW Warden Stamp will be available ($5) to help support CDFW enforcement and fund the purchase of equipment. The enforcement display trailer features a free enclosed laser shot game and youths will have a chance to catch a fish from the CDFW-stocked fishing pond. Learn about the changes made in fish stocking over the decades as a 1925 Dodge truck used by CDFW for transporting hatchery fish will be on display alongside a new fish-transporting truck. CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham and staff will participate in a public forum March 7 to answer questions and discuss important issues regarding California’s fish and wildlife resources. Admission is $16 for adults, $15 for military and seniors (62 and older) and free for youths 15 years old and younger with a paid adult. For more information, please visit www.fredhall.com/pages/long_beach/longbeach.php.

7 — 3rd Annual San Joaquin River Fishing Derby, Sycamore Island, 39664 Ave. 7 1/2, Madera (93638), 7 a.m. to noon, with registration beginning at 6 a.m. The event is co-sponsored by CDFW, Trout Unlimited, the San Joaquin River Parkway and Conservation Trust, the San Joaquin River Conservancy and the Natural Resources Defense Council. The derby is a celebration of the San Joaquin River’s diverse fishing and recreational opportunities. Prizes will include annual passes to three fishing locations on the San Joaquin River, summer camp scholarships, canoe rides and a California Lifetime Fishing License. Prizes will be awarded at noon. There is no charge to enter the fishing derby but participants are required to pay the regular Sycamore Island day use fee of $9 per vehicle and $5 per trailered boat. For more information about Sycamore Island, please visit http://tinyurl.com/nxnu3jk.

12 — Invasive Watersnakes Lecture presented by Dr. Brian Todd, 1 to 3 p.m. in the Natural Resources Building Auditorium, 1416 Ninth St., Sacramento (95814). This lecture is part of the Conservation Lecture Series which introduces participants to California’s diverse wildlife. Non-native watersnakes are among the newest threats to California’s native freshwater biodiversity. Dr. Brian Todd, an associate professor at UC Davis, will describe his work with these species over the past several years. Todd will present an overview of the ecology and invasion history of watersnakes in California and will describe the potential risk these non-native species pose to many of California’s amphibian and fish species of conservation concern. He will discuss his ongoing research and efforts to facilitate management and eradication of these non-native species. This free event will also be webcast live. To register, please visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/lectures. For more information, please email cesa@wildlife.ca.gov.

14 — Recreational Abalone Advisory Committee Meeting, 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Stephen G. Benavides Professional Accountancy Corporation, 1910 E Warner Avenue # 2-F, Santa Ana (92705). The eeting is open to the general public and will include a public comment period. For more information, please contact Ian Taniguchi at (562) 342-7182 or at ian.taniguchi@wildlife.ca.gov.

14-15 — Siskiyou Sportsmen’s Expo, Siskiyou Golden Fairgrounds, 1712 Fairlane Road, Yreka (96097), 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (March 14) and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (March 15).  CDFW will have an information booth and a pond stocked with fish. CDFW will also provide fishing poles, tackle and bait. For more information about the event, please call (530) 842-2767 or if you are interested in signing up to help work at the CDFW booth, please contact Keith Pomeroy at (530) 475-3420.

16 — California Fish and Game Commission Special Meeting (Teleconference). Time to be determined. For more information, please visit www.fgc.ca.gov/meetings/2015/index.aspx.

18 — Last Day of California Spiny Lobster Recreational and Commercial Fishing Season, Statewide. For more information, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/invertebrate/lobster.asp.

21 — Nest Box Survey Orientation at Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., 3207 Rutherford Road, Gridley (95948). This free orientation meeting is required for those participating in a season-long field study. Crews of two or three will collect detailed data used to understand and enhance the local wood duck population and other wildlife. Commitment time varies but averages four hours twice per month, April through July. Participation is open to those ages 18 and over. Due to limited space, please make reservations early. For more information, please call (530) 846-7505 or email lori.dieter@wildlife.ca.gov.

26-29 — Fred Hall Fishing, Tackle and Boat Show, Del Mar Fairgrounds, 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd., Del Mar (92014). Visit the CDFW booth to ask questions and purchase licenses, tags and report cards. The new 2015 CDFW Warden Stamp will be available ($5) to help support CDFW enforcement and fund the purchase of equipment. The enforcement display trailer features a free enclosed laser shot game and youths will have a chance to catch a fish from the CDFW-stocked fishing pond. Learn about the changes made in fish stocking over the decades as a 1925 Dodge truck used by CDFW for transporting hatchery fish will be on display alongside a new fish-transporting truck. CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham and staff will participate in a public forum March 28 to answer questions and discuss important issues regarding California’s fish and wildlife resources. The fee is $13 for adults, $12 seniors (62 and older) and admission is free for active military and youths 15 years old and younger with a paid adult. For more information, please visit www.fredhall.com.

 

CDFW Clarifies Use of “Unplugged” Shotguns

Media Contacts:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 651-6692

Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988
Ducks and Geese2

CDFW Clarifies Use of “Unplugged” Shotguns

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) seeks to clear up an inadvertently included sentence in the 2014-2015 California Waterfowl Hunting Regulations that led to confusion about the use of an “unplugged” shotgun for late-season waterfowl hunts.

The language in question is included in the synopsis of current federal regulations, located at the back of this year’s California Waterfowl Hunting Regulations booklet. On Page 84, the booklet states that no person shall take migratory game birds:

“… with a shotgun of any description capable of holding more than three shells, unless it is plugged with a one-piece filler, incapable of removal without disassembling the gun, so its total capacity does not exceed three shells. This restriction does not apply during dates States have selected under the Conservation Order for light geese (i.e. greater and lesser snow and Ross’s geese) or those selected for the control of resident Canada geese. (States insert appropriate dates for light goose only and Canada goose only seasons.)

Please note that the section of the regulations underlined above is incorrect and does not apply anywhere in California. The plugged shotgun requirement remains in effect for all goose hunting seasons in California.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which has primary jurisdiction over management of the nation’s waterfowl, does authorize the use of unplugged shotguns and other techniques in certain parts of the country, in specific circumstances when population reductions are desired. However, federal regulations do not provide for these exceptions in California.

Almost all of California’s wintering goose populations are at the highest levels in decades, resulting in liberal harvest limits and several special late season goose-only hunts around the state. While in the field, hunters can access the regulations via smartphone at www.wildlife.ca.gov/Hunting/Waterfowl . The incorrect language relative to the unplugged shotguns has been removed in the online version.

CDFW apologizes for the confusion and will remove the inapplicable reference in next year’s regulations booklet.

Restoration Grant Program Draft Guidelines Now Available for Public Comment

Media Contacts:
Helen Birss, CDFW Watershed Restoration Grant Branch, (916) 653-9834
Jordan Traverso, CDFW Communications, (916) 654-9937

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is excited to announce the release of the Restoration Grant Program draft guidelines authorized and funded by Proposition 1 (Water Quality, Supply and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014), which was passed by California voters last November. CDFW is now seeking public input on these guidelines via email, mail and a series of public meetings.

“This is an important opportunity to continue and expand upon the work we do across the state to restore habitat for fish and wildlife and protect important landscapes, while fostering partnerships and selecting the best projects through a competitive process,” said CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham.

For CDFW, this bond act provides, in total, $285 million for ecosystem restoration projects outside the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and $87.5 million for projects that benefit the Delta. Ecosystem restoration provides important benefits to water supply and sustainability as well as fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Ecosystem restoration is also a climate change mitigation and adaptation strategy.

The public is encouraged to review and comment on the draft guidelines which can be found both at the CDFW Grants website and the Bond Accountability website. Written comments should be emailed to the WatershedGrants@wildlife.ca.gov or mailed to:

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Restoration Grant Program
1416 Ninth St.
Sacramento, CA 95814

CDFW will hold three public meetings in March and April 2015 for the purpose of receiving comments on the draft guidelines. The meeting dates and locations will be posted on the CDFW Grants website when available.

The purpose of the guidelines is to establish the process, procedures and criteria through which CDFW will administer competitive grants for multi-benefit ecosystem and watershed protection and restoration projects in accordance with statewide priorities, including those in the California Water Action Plan. To achieve this, CDFW is creating two new grant programs. The Watershed Restoration Grant Program will focus on watershed restoration outside of the Delta and the Delta Water Quality and Ecosystem Restoration Grant Program will focus on water quality, ecosystem restoration and fish protection facilities that benefit the Delta.

Special Low Flow Conditions Annually from October 1 through April 30 for Coastal Streams in Mendocino, Sonoma and Marin Counties

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) informs anglers that sport fishing regulation changes have gone into effect for coastal streams in Mendocino, Sonoma and Marin counties. The new regulations can be found in Title 14, California Code of Regulations, section 8.00 (b).

On December 3, 2014, the California Fish and Game Commission adopted a regulation for annual Special Low Flow Conditions from October 1 through April 30 for coastal streams within the three counties. This regulation now bases flow closure conditions for Mendocino County streams on the Navarro River gauge near Navarro by establishing a minimum flow of 200 cubic feet per second (cfs) at the USGS gauging station on the main stem Navarro River near Navarro, Calif.

With the exception of the Russian River, coastal streams in Marin and Sonoma counties will be based on the South Fork Gualala River gauge near Sea Ranch with the establishment of a minimum flow of 150 cfs at the gauging station on the South Fork Gualala River near Sea Ranch (Sonoma County).

The new regulation also establishes low flow conditions for the Russian River in Mendocino and Sonoma counties based on the Russian River gauge near Guerneville. These streams will be closed to fishing when stream conditions fall below the minimum flow of 300 cfs at the gauging station located on the main stem Russian River near Guerneville (Sonoma County).

Low stream flow conditions prevent the movement of salmon and steelhead to their spawning grounds, increasing their vulnerability to predation, physiological stress and angling pressure. These coastal streams provide critical life-stage habitat for coastal Chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead trout. All three of these species are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). Coho salmon is also listed under the California ESA.

In addition, CDFW will make low flow stream closure information available to the public by a telephone recorded message updated, as necessary, no later than 1 p.m. each Monday, Wednesday and Friday as to whether any stream will be open or closed to fishing. It shall be the responsibility of the angler to use the telephone number designated in the sport fishing regulations booklet to obtain information on the status of any stream.

The number for low flow stream closure information is (707) 822-3164 for Mendocino County and (707) 944-5533 for Sonoma, Marin and Napa counties.

Media Contacts:
Ryan Watanabe, CDFW Bay Delta Region, (707) 576-2815
Allan Renger, CDFW Northern Region, (707) 725-7194
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

Euthanasia Drugs Reach the Wrong Animals

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has confirmed that several turkey vultures have been poisoned from the veterinary euthanasia drug pentobarbital in Marin County.

Six turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) were brought to the WildCare Wildlife Hospital in San Rafael between July and October 2014. All the birds were comatose and barely breathing, presenting a medical mystery to the wildlife hospital staff.

With immediate and intensive medical intervention all of the birds recovered, and digestive samples were sent to a laboratory to determine what made them sick. CDFW confirmed pentobarbital exposure in all birds tested, but the source of the exposure remains unknown.

Pentobarbital is a drug used by veterinarians to euthanize companion animals, livestock and horses. If the remains of animals euthanized with pentobarbital are not properly disposed of after death, scavenging wildlife – such as turkey vultures and eagles – can be poisoned. Veterinarians and animal owners are responsible for disposing of animal remains properly by legal methods such as cremation or deep burial.

Turkey vultures are protected by the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act and California Fish and Game Code. Improperly disposed-of euthanized remains are a danger to all scavenging wildlife.

Members of the veterinary and livestock communities are asked to share this information with colleagues in an effort to prevent further incidents.

WildCare also asks the public to pay attention to grounded turkey vultures and other raptors and scavengers.

Pentobarbital-poisoned birds appear to be dead. They have no reflex response and breathing can barely be detected. The birds appear intact, without wounds or obvious trauma. Anyone finding a comatose vulture should call WildCare’s 24-hour Hotline at (415) 456-SAVE (7283) immediately.

Read more about one pentobarbital-poisoned turkey vulture patient and the astonishing medical intervention required to save its life at http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/vulture. WildCare also has numerous photos and videos of the animals in care, as well as release footage.

Media Contacts:
Alison Hermance, WildCare, (415) 453-1000, ext. 24, alisonhermance@wildcarebayarea.org
Stella McMillin, CDFW Wildlife Investigations Lab, (916) 358-2954
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

CalTIP Pilot Program to Take Poaching and Pollution Tips Via Text Message and a New App

Media Contacts:
Lt. Mike Milotz, CDFW Law Enforcement and CalTIP Program, (916) 654-1485
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 651-6692

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has launched a pilot program that makes it easier for the public to report wildlife and pollution crimes with their cell phones.

Buckler 2007

Tipsters can now text anonymous information, including photographs, to the Californians Turn in Poachers and Polluters (CalTIP) program via “tip411” (numerically, 847411). Wildlife officers can respond directly, resulting in an anonymous two-way conversation.

Users must start the text message with the word “Caltip”.

Phone number line, type: 847411

Message line, type: Caltip (followed by the message/tip)

deadeagle

In conjunction with tip411 (847411), CDFW  is launching a CalTIP smartphone application which similarly enables the public to share an anonymous tip and/or photograph with wildlife officers and lets the officers converse anonymously with the tipster. The CalTIP App can be downloaded for free via the Google Play Store and iTunes App Store. Standard message and data rates may apply.

Anonymous tips can also be submitted right from CDFW’s website at www.dfg.ca.gov/enforcement/caltip.aspx.

Both the CALTIP App and tip411 are completely anonymous, as the technology removes all identifying information before wildlife officers see the tips.

“We believe the public is our greatest law enforcement resource,” said CDFW Lt. Michael Milotz, CalTIP coordinator. “Tip411 and the CalTIP App will give us another tool to combat pollution and the unlawful take and commercialization of California’s wildlife.”

During the two-month pilot period, CDFW will collect usage data to help determine whether tip411 and the CalTIP App will be permanently added to the CalTIP program.

CalTIP is a confidential secret witness program that encourages the public to provide factual information leading to the arrest of poachers and polluters. The program is funded by penalty assessments generated by fines from wildlife violators and polluters. The existing CalTIP confidential secret witness phone number, 1-888-334-2258, will remain operational 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Wildlife officers encourage anyone who witnesses a poaching or polluting violation, or who has information about a violation, to report it using any means available.

CDFW to Offer Deer Hunting Clinic in San Bernardino County

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Advanced Hunter Education Program, the Hunter Education Instructor Association of Southern California and the California Deer Association will jointly sponsor a deer hunting clinic on Saturday, April 11. The clinic will be held at the Apple Valley Gun Club in Victorville in San Bernardino County.

The clinic is designed for Southern California deer hunters of all skill levels. The clinic will cover deer biology, hunting techniques and regulations, methods for locating deer, locations to hunt, field dressing and care of game.

The clinic is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $45. Youths 17 years and younger are free, but must be accompanied by adult.

Space is limited and participants must register in advance here. After registering, participants will receive an email with a map to the facility and a list of items to bring. CDFW’s Advanced Hunter Education Program will provide all necessary class equipment.

Victorville is located approximately 60 miles north of Los Angeles.

Media Contacts:
Lt. Alan Gregory, CDFW Advanced Hunter Education Program, (209) 329-7426

Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

# # #

Please do not reply to this e-mail. CDFWNews@wildlife.ca.gov is for outgoing messages only and is not checked for incoming mail. For questions about this News Release, contact the individual(s) listed above. Thank you.

Subscribe to CDFW News via e-mail or RSS feed. Go to https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/news

Like CDFW on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/CaliforniaDFW and Twitter @CaliforniaDFW.

Persons with disabilities needing reasonable accommodation to participate in public meetings or other CDFW activities are invited to contact the Department’s Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator Melissa Carlin at (916) 651-1214 or Melissa.Carlin@wildlife.ca.gov. Reasonable Accommodation requests for facility and/or meeting accessibility should be received at least 21 days prior to the event. Requests for American Sign Language Interpreters should be submitted at least two weeks prior to the event, and requests for Real-Time Captioning at least four weeks prior to the event. These timeframes are to help ensure that the requested accommodation is met. If a request for an accommodation has been submitted but due to circumstances is no longer needed, please contact the Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator immediately.

CDFW Offers One-day Northern California Turkey Hunting Clinic

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Advanced Hunter Education Program is offering a Turkey hunting clinic on Saturday, March 14 at Gray Lodge Wildlife Area near Gridley.

Experienced instructors will instruct this exciting clinic. Topics covered will be concepts of decoy placement, blind design, ballistics, calling, equipment, game care and cleaning, cooking tips and safety.

The clinic is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $45. Youths 16 years and younger are free, but must be accompanied by adult.

Space is limited and participants must register in advance here. After registering, participants will receive an email with a map to the facility and a list of items to bring. CDFW’s Advanced Hunter Education Program will provide all necessary class equipment.

Gray Lodge Wildlife Area is located, approximately 60 miles north of Sacramento

Media Contacts:
Lt. Alan Gregory, CDFW Advanced Hunter Education Program, (209) 329-7426
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

# # #

Please do not reply to this e-mail. CDFWNews@wildlife.ca.gov is for outgoing messages only and is not checked for incoming mail. For questions about this News Release, contact the individual(s) listed above. Thank you.

Subscribe to CDFW News via e-mail or RSS feed. Go to https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/news

Like CDFW on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/CaliforniaDFW and Twitter @CaliforniaDFW.

Persons with disabilities needing reasonable accommodation to participate in public meetings or other CDFW activities are invited to contact the Department’s Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator Melissa Carlin at (916) 651-1214 or Melissa.Carlin@wildlife.ca.gov. Reasonable Accommodation requests for facility and/or meeting accessibility should be received at least 21 days prior to the event. Requests for American Sign Language Interpreters should be submitted at least two weeks prior to the event, and requests for Real-Time Captioning at least four weeks prior to the event. These timeframes are to help ensure that the requested accommodation is met. If a request for an accommodation has been submitted but due to circumstances is no longer needed, please contact the Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator immediately.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife News

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