Shikar-Safari Club International Honors Lt. Sheree Christensen as Wildlife Officer of the Year

Lt. Sheree Christensen - 2014 Wildlife Officer of the Year.
Lt. Sheree Christensen – 2014 Wildlife Officer of the Year.
Media Contacts:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 508-7095
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Lt. Sheree Christensen was recently selected by the Shikar-Safari Club International as the recipient of its 2014 Wildlife Officer of the Year award.

Each year, the club honors a wildlife officer who has shown exemplary conduct and initiative in the performance of his or her duties. Christensen was selected for her innate ability to lead by example. She has worked in Contra Costa and Alameda counties for more than 25 years and understands local natural resource issues better than anyone in the area. Christensen is known to take the extra step and share her experience and knowledge with those who work with her. She takes the time to teach other wildlife officers within and outside of her squad about San Francisco Bay Area natural resource issues, the laws that protect the resources and why those laws were enacted.

Without hesitation, Christensen accompanies the wildlife officers she supervises on boat patrols, fish business inspections, decoy operations, wildlife checkpoints, undercover operations, investigating illegal streambed alterations and pollution incidents. She has been a leader in CDFW’s tenacious effort to stop the illegal sale of prohibited, threatened and endangered species. Christensen has led many special enforcement details to target those who sell recreationally caught fish for personal profit. She prepares the detail plans, utilizing members of her squad, other CDFW squads and allied law enforcement agencies, and follows the cases from the investigation stage through the prosecution stage. Countless state resources have been protected by the tireless efforts of Christensen.

CDFW congratulates Lt. Christensen on this exceptional honor.

Shikar-Safari was founded in 1952 as a hunting organization but quickly recognized its potential to affect meaningful change in the area of wildlife conservation. Funds raised by the Shikar-Safari Club International Foundation are used to support various conservation projects in the United States and throughout the world.

 California Fish and Game Scientific Journal Completes 100th Anniversary Series

Journal Cover FinalThe California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) just published the fourth and final 100year special anniversary issue of the highly respected scientific journal California Fish and Game.

 Print copies of the latest issue, focusing on special fisheries, and the three previous issues on native plants, marine life and terrestrial wildlife, are available for purchase through Aug. 31. Volumes 1, 2 and 4 are $6.47 each, plus tax and shipping. Volume 3 is $8.25, plus tax and shipping.

All four issues are also available for download at no charge. Links to both options can be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/publications/journal/contents.html.

The newly released special fisheries issue includes both historical accounts and the results of original research on fisheries ecology conducted by CDFW scientists, as well as by scientists in other resource management agencies, academic institutions and non-governmental organizations. It features an introduction by Fran Pavley, Chair of the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee, and additional remarks co-authored by CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham and E. Philip Pister, retired CDFW fisheries biologist.

In her introduction to the fisheries issue, Pavley writes, “This topic is appropriate—or perhaps ironic—in this third year of severe drought, when fresh water supply is a critical issue for all Californians. The drought’s effects may be even more severe on wildlife than on humans, since fish and animals can’t store, import pump groundwater, or buy water in bottles. They live or die with what nature (and sometimes we) can provide.”

California Fish and Game is an internationally recognized research publication read primarily by scientists in the fields of conservation, ecology and natural resource management. It focuses on the wildlife of North America’s west coast (primarily California) and the eastern North Pacific Ocean, but occasionally includes material from elsewhere. It is the longest continuously running scientific journal in California.

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Media Contacts:
Dr. Vern Bleich, California Fish and Game Editor, (916) 322-8911
Carol Singleton, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8962

California Rifle and Pistol Association Honors CDFW Assistant Chief Roy Griffith as Wildlife Officer of the Year

Asst. Chief Roy Griffith is honored by the California Rifle and Pistol Association
Asst. Chief Roy Griffith is honored by the California Rifle and Pistol Association

Since 2004, recently promoted Assistant Chief Roy Griffith of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has worked tirelessly to recruit and train new hunter education instructors from throughout California. During his 11 years as captain of California’s Hunter Education Program, the number of certified instructors rose from 300 to more than 1,000. The California Rifle and Pistol Association (CRPA) recently recognized these efforts by naming him as their 2014 Wildlife Officer of the Year.

Griffith began his wildlife officer career with CDFW in 1990, working in Southern California’s Chino District. He conducted extensive undercover operations as a member of the Special Operations Unit before changing his focus to the enforcement of laws related to habitat destruction. But he is best known for his role as captain of the Hunter Education Program, where his multi-generational approach and passion for “passing on the tradition” are evident to all who have worked with him.

When Griffith took the position of captain, California was experiencing a dramatic decline in the number of hunter education instructors. Griffith stepped up recruitment efforts, putting a special emphasis on bilingual outreach in order to reach prospective hunters who do not speak English as their first language. Now as Assistant Chief, Griffith continues to oversee the Hunter Education Program as part of his overall duties.

The all-volunteer cadre of hunter education instructors forms the framework for CDFW’s efforts to promote safe and ethical hunting to the next generation. The program includes annual re-certification of all 1,000 hunter education instructors. During the recertification, they learn the most current hunting and firearm safety training standards aligned with the state’s wildlife conservation needs and principles.

Hunter education instructors often volunteer for CDFW in many non-hunter education related venues, such as outdoor sporting shows, community events and anywhere else CDFW staff needs a hand.

Part of CRPA’s mission is to ensure proper management and respect for our state’s wildlife resources and to encourage public education concerning these resources. CRPA has regularly supported wildlife conservation, wildlife officers and hunting and firearms safety training statewide.

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Media Contacts:
Capt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 508-7095

Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

CDFW Takes Three Golds at Excellence in Communications Competition

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Alexia Retallack received a Lifetime Achievement Award for her work in public affairs from the State Information Officers Council (SIOC). Additionally, CDFW staff from the Office of Communications, Education and Outreach took top honors in three categories of the 2014 SIOC statewide competition for excellence in state government communications.

The SIOC awards ceremony held recently recognized the frontline of professionals in media relations within state government and showcased their importance in effectively delivering agency or department messages to the public. Honors were awarded in nine different categories ranging from writing to graphic design and audio/visual productions. The annual event encompassed 15 agencies and 120 individual entries.

“I’m so proud of the way CDFW delivers our message to our constituent groups and the general public,” CDFW Deputy Director of Communications Jordan Traverso said. “Whether the message comes through a spokesperson in the field or on a DVD produced to showcase a program, our goal is to present the truest, clearest message as quickly as possible. The SIOC awards this team earned indicates they remain at the top of their game.

Highlighting the ceremony was the presentation to Retallack of the Lifetime Achievement Award. The award recognized her dedication to the field of public information for nearly two decades. Starting in 1997, Retallack has served as an information officer, an associate editor and a marketing specialist. In 2009, she took over the public affairs unit at the Office of Spill Prevention and Response under CDFW.

In addition to the three Gold Awards, CDFW earned two Silver awards and two Honorable Mentions by the panel of judges.

Gold Awards
Outdoor California, January-February Issue (publication, magazine)
California Sea Otter Fund 2014 Campaign (media campaign)
Red-Legged Frog Named State Amphibian (writing, news release)

Silver Awards
Inside California’s Emerald Triangle (writing, feature)
California Outdoors Q&As (“Best Bang for Your Buck”)

Honorable Mentions
Nightingale’s Call (writing, feature)
Special Centennial Volume of California Fish and Game (special publication)

Individual CDFW communications professionals honored included Marketing Specialists Dana Michaels, Harry Morse and Troy Swauger, Environmental Scientist Carrie Wilson, Audio-Video Specialist Debra Hamilton, Editor Vern Bleich and Communications Manager Kirsten Macintyre.

SIOC is a nonprofit organization offering professional development and networking opportunities for public information officers throughout California. Its annual competition for excellence in state government communications honor media-related professionals.

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Media Contact:
Jordan Traverso, CDFW Communications, (916) 654-9937

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

At its May 21 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $17.8 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 19 funded projects will benefit fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide the public with access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, land owners and the local community. The funds for all these projects come from initiatives approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources. Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $360,000 grant to American Rivers, Inc., for a cooperative project with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), US Forest Service (USFS), Wildlife Conservation Society, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Alpine Watershed Group, for ecological restoration of the West Fork Carson River in CDFW’s Hope Valley Wildlife Area and the USFS’s Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, 12 miles south of South Lake Tahoe in Alpine County.
  • A $450,000 grant to the Redwood Community Action Agency for a cooperative project with Humboldt and Del Norte County Agriculture Departments, California Department of Transportation, California Department of Parks and Recreation and the Yurok Tribe, to eradicate non-native knotweeds and other invasive species at more than 100 locations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties.
  • A $1.6 million grant to Pacific Forest Trust to acquire a conservation easement over approximately 3,468 acres of land to protect of a mixed conifer working forest and habitat linkages located near the community of Montague in Siskiyou County.
  • A $2.1 million grant for the acquisition of a conservation easement over approximately 1,447 acres of land by CDFW for a cooperative project with The Trust for Public Land, to protect native oak woodlands habitat near Penn Valley in Nevada County.
  • A $465,000 grant to the Santa Cruz Resource Conservation District for a cooperative project with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, California Conservation Corps, State Coastal Conservancy, State Water Resources Control Board, Land Trust of Santa Cruz County and a private landowner, to restore riparian habitat in areas critical to special status amphibian and fish species, located on two coastal watersheds in Santa Cruz County.
  • A $568,000 grant to The Nature Conservancy for a cooperative project with the National Park Service to eliminate Argentine ants from Santa Cruz Island, approximately 20 miles west of Ventura Harbor in Santa Barbara County.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

small river with pebble bottom running through a dry Alpine wilderness
West Fork Carson River in CDFW’s Hope Valley Wildlife Area and the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, in Alpine County. WCB photo
Green, leafy groundcover blankets floor of deciduous forest
Non-native knotweeds and other invasive species found in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. Photo by Monica Walker
narrow creek runs through green meadow with a few tall conifer trees
Butte Creek in Siskiyou County
Black, red and white sign warning of Argentine ants, posted on rural wood fence
Invasive Argentine ants warning on Santa Cruz Island, in the Santa Barbara Channel.
Creek runs through green and brown forest brush
Riparian habitat in areas critical to special status amphibian and fish species, in a coastal watershed in Santa Cruz County. WCB photo
Oak trees on a hill surrounded by dry, yellow grasses
Native oak woodlands habitat near Penn Valley in Nevada County. WCB photo

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Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Education and Outreach, (916) 322-2420

Boaters Can Help Fight Spread of Invasive Quagga and Zebra Mussels Over Memorial Day Weekend

Media Contacts:
Dennis Weber, California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways, (916) 651-8724
Kyle Orr, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, (916) 322-8958
Doug Carlson, California Department of Water Resources, (916) 653-5114
Steve Lyle, California Department of Food and Agriculture, (916) 654-0462

California agencies combatting the spread of invasive quagga and zebra mussels remind boaters to remain vigilant over the three-day Memorial Day weekend.

Quagga on quarter

People who launch vessels at any body of water are subject to watercraft inspections and are encouraged to clean, drain and dry their motorized and non-motorized boats, including personal watercraft, and any equipment that comes into contact with the water before and after recreating at a waterway.

“Our state’s natural resources are facing unprecedented threats today,” said California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Director Charlton H. Bonham. “Preventing the spread of quagga and zebra mussels, as well as other invasive species, is something everyone can take an active role in, thereby helping to protect the fish, wildlife and the habitats on which they depend.”

Quagga and zebra mussels, non-native freshwater mussels native to Eurasia, multiply quickly and encrust watercraft and infrastructure, and compete for food with native and sport fish species. These mussels can be spread from one body of water to another attached to nearly anything that has been in an infested waterbody, or via standing water from an infested waterbody entrapped in boat engines, bilges, live-wells and buckets.

To ensure that watercraft is clean, drained and dry, many local agencies are conducting boat inspections. CDFW has posted a list of these inspections on its website (www.wildlife.ca.gov/mussels) along with additional information about the invasive mussels and what people can do to help prevent their spread in California. Boaters should call ahead to check for restrictions prior to visiting their destination.

Take the following steps before traveling to a waterbody to prevent spreading invasive mussels, to improve your inspection experience and to safeguard California waterways:

  • CLEAN — inspect exposed surfaces and remove all plants and organisms,
  • DRAIN — all water, including water contained in lower outboard units, live-wells and bait buckets, and
  • DRY — allow the watercraft to thoroughly dry between launches. Watercraft should be kept dry for at least five days in warm weather and up to 30 days in cool weather.

CDFW has developed a brief video demonstrating the ease of implementing the clean, drain and dry prevention method, which can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GaeAIPLoK-k. In addition, a detailed guide to cleaning vessels of invasive mussels is available on the California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) at www.dbw.parks.ca.gov/quagga.

Travelers are also advised to be prepared for inspections at California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) Border Protection Stations. Over the past eight years, more than one million watercraft entering the state have been inspected at the Border Protection Stations. Inspections, which can also be conducted by CDFW and California State Parks, include a check of boats and personal watercraft, as well as trailers and all onboard items. Contaminated vessels and equipment are subject to quarantine or impoundment.

Quagga mussels were first detected in the Colorado River system in January 2007 and were later found in San Diego and Riverside counties. They are now known to be in 29 waters in California, all in Southern California. Zebra mussels were discovered in San Justo Reservoir in San Benito County in January 2008.

Both species can attach to and damage virtually any submerged surface. They can:

  • Ruin a boat engine by blocking the cooling system and causing it to overheat
  • Jam a boat’s steering equipment, putting occupants and others at risk
  • Require frequent scraping and repainting of boat hulls
  • Colonize all underwater substrates such as boat ramps, docks, lines and other underwater surfaces, causing them to require constant cleaning
  • Cost the owners of these items a lot of money

A multi-agency effort that includes CDFW, DBW, CDFA and the California Department of Water Resources has been leading an outreach campaign to alert the public to the quagga and zebra mussel threats. A toll-free hotline at 1 (866) 440-9530 is available for those seeking information on quagga or zebra mussels.

California’s State Wildlife Action Plan 2015 Available for Public Review

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has released the draft California State Wildlife Action Plan 2015 Update (SWAP 2015) and is seeking public input. Public input will help shape the final SWAP 2015, which will be completed by October 2015. The draft SWAP 2015 is available online at www.wildlife.ca.gov/SWAP.  Written comments on SWAP 2015 can be submitted on the website, by emailing SWAP@wildlife.ca.gov or by mail to SWAP 2015 Update, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, 1416 Ninth Street, 12th Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814. The comment period is open from May 18 through July 2, 2015.

SWAP 2015 is a comprehensive, statewide plan for conserving California’s fish and wildlife and their vital natural habitats for future generations. It is part of a nationwide effort by all 50 states and five U.S. territories to develop conservation action plans and participate in the federally authorized State and Tribal Wildlife Grants (SWG) Program.

Congress created the SWG program in 2000, recognizing the need to fund programs for the conservation of wildlife diversity. California’s first SWAP was completed by California Department of Fish and Game (now CDFW) and approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 2005. CDFW has received approximately $37 million in federal support for the state’s wildlife conservation activities through the SWG program from 2005 through 2014. The SWG program requires that SWAPs be updated at least every 10 years. CDFW has now prepared the draft SWAP 2015, which is the first comprehensive update of SWAP 2005. SWAPs are required to include provisions to ensure public participation in the development, revision and implementation of projects and programs.

Public meetings to provide information about SWAP 2015 will be held in Sacramento, Oakland, San Diego and Los Angeles.  See www.wildlife.ca.gov/SWAP for more details.

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Media Contacts:
Carol Singleton, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8962
Armand Gonzales, SWAP Project Lead, (916) 616-0691

CDFW Scientist Recognized for Conservation Work on Sage Grouse

Left to right: California Natural Resources Secretary John Laird, CDFW Senior Environmental Scientist  Scott Gardner and CDFW Chief Deputy Director Kevin Hunting.
Left to right: California Natural Resources Secretary John Laird, CDFW Senior Environmental Scientist Scott Gardner and CDFW Chief Deputy Director Kevin Hunting.
Media Contact:
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Senior Environmental Scientist Scott Gardner has received a Special Thanks for Achieving Results (STAR) Award from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) for his extensive work on sage grouse.

Gardner co-led the development of the Bi-State Conservation Plan for Greater Sage-Grouse, which included the Nevada Department of Wildlife and other stakeholders. He has also collaborated with U.S. Geological Survey scientists to develop a strong science-based approach and led multi-year sage grouse studies that provided critical information to support the plan’s population and habitat models.

On April 21, 2015, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell, along with Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval and California Natural Resources Secretary John Laird, jointly announced that the Bi-State Distinct Population Segment of greater sage-grouse did not need to be listed under the Endangered Species Act. This decision reversed an earlier proposal to list this population segment as threatened. It was determined the conservation plan developed by Gardner and his colleagues addressed the threats to sage grouse and provided commitments from agencies and the local community.

“Developing an action plan that engages the local community, develops critical partnerships and reverses a proposal to list a species goes above and beyond the call of duty. We couldn’t be more proud of Scott and his dedication to wildlife conservation,” said CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham.

In addition to the plan, Gardner had a key role in developing partnerships between agencies as well as diverse groups of public and private stakeholders. Over time, these groups worked toward a common goal to develop conservation agreements, which recognized the value of healthy sagebrush ecosystems to wildlife, people and the local economy.

More information about the Bi-State Conservation Plan and the recent USFWS decision are available at http://www.fws.gov/greatersagegrouse/.

Nonlead Ammunition Requirement Approaches

Starting July 1, 2015, nonlead ammunition will be required when hunting on all California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) lands and for all Nelson bighorn sheep hunts anywhere in the state.

CDFW reminds hunters who plan to hunt bighorn sheep or at any CDFW wildlife areas or ecological reserves where hunting is allowed on or after July 1, 2015 to acquire nonlead ammunition well ahead of their hunt.  Hunters are also encouraged to practice shooting nonlead ammunition to make sure firearms are sighted-in properly and shoot accurately with nonlead ammunition. Please note nonlead ammunition for some firearm calibers may be in short supply and hunters should plan accordingly.

CDFW held 14 public meetings in 12 cities from Eureka to San Diego to gain comments from hunters on how best to implement AB 711, the legislation that requires nonlead ammunition for all hunting statewide by July 1, 2019. The department listened to feedback from hunters and proposed an implementation plan that would be least disruptive to the hunting community while adhering to the requirements of the law. The California Fish and Game Commission recently adopted the implementation plan.

Further phase-out of lead ammunition for hunting in California will occur on July 1, 2016, when hunters must use nonlead ammunition when hunting with shotguns for upland game birds (except for dove, quail and snipe), small game mammals, fur-bearing mammals, and nongame birds except for when hunting at licensed game bird clubs. Nonlead ammunition will also be required when taking wildlife for depredation purposes anywhere in the state.Starting on July 1, 2019 hunters must use nonlead ammunition when taking any animal anywhere in the state for any purpose.

Lead ammunition may still be used for all non-hunting purposes including target shooting. The implementation of AB 711 does not affect the laws regarding the existing nonlead “Condor Zone” where it remains illegal to hunt using lead ammunition.

Hunting is not allowed at all CDFW wildlife areas and ecological reserves. For those areas where hunting is allowed, nonlead ammunition will be required starting July 1, 2015. Hunters are reminded to be familiar with all hunting regulations before going into the field.

A list of CDFW wildlife areas and ecological reserves along with specific regulations for each can be found in the booklet, Hunting Regulations for Waterfowl, Upland Game and Department Lands Public Use at https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=88820&inline.

Information on certified nonlead ammunition can be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/lead-free/certifiedammo.html.

More information on the phase-out of lead ammunition for hunting in California can be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/lead-free/.

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Media Contacts:
Craig Stowers, CDFW Wildlife Branch, (916) 445-3553
Clark Blanchard, CDFW Communications, (916) 651-7824
Lt. Patrick Foy, CDFW Law Enforcement, (916) 651-6692

Big Game Drawing Deadline Approaches

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is reminding hunters that the deadline to apply for the 2015 Big Game Drawing is June 2, 2015. Applicants must complete the sales transaction before midnight on June 2, 2015. Applications for elk, antelope, bighorn sheep, premium deer tags and fundraising drawing tags may be submitted at any CDFW license agent, CDFW license sales office, by telephone sales or online.

The following resources are available to assist hunters in applying for the big game drawing:

  • Proposed seasons, tag drawing application instructions and drawing statistics can be found in the 2015 California Big Game Hunting Digest. The book is available at www.dfg.ca.gov/publications/digest/.
  • Final 2015 big-game tag quotas can be found on the respective species web page located under the “Hunting” tab at www.wildlife.ca.gov.
  • To find a license agent near you or to purchase items online, visit www.ca.wildlifelicense.com/internetsales/.
  • To submit drawing applications by telephone, contact the telephone sales line at (800) 565-1458.

 Junior Hunting License Changes

Junior Hunting License applicants must now be under 18 years of age as of July 1 of the license year. Applicants with a Junior Hunting License will be eligible to apply for the apprentice hunt tags.

Harvest Reporting Now Mandatory

Beginning with the 2015 deer season, all deer hunters will be required to report their deer tags to CDFW. Any person who is issued a deer tag must submit a report for the tag after the hunt, even if they did not hunt, or if they did not harvest a deer. Imposition of the $20 non-reporting fee has been delayed by the Fish and Game Commission until the 2016 season. Failure to report 2016 results will require payment of the non-reporting fee prior to purchasing tags and tag applications in 2017.

Hunters have two methods to submit their harvest reports:

  • Online – Submit an online report for each deer tag you are issued, at www.ca.wildlifelicense.com/internetsales/. When you report online, you receive instant confirmation that your report has been received and accepted.
  • By Mail – Any person who does not report their deer tag online must return the report card portion of each deer tag they are issued to: CDFW – Wildlife Branch, PO Box 944209, Sacramento, CA 94299-0002.

D6 Deer Tag Quota Raised

The D6 zone deer tag is classified as a premium deer tag for the 2015 hunting season. Hunters interested in the D6 zone deer tag will need to apply through the annual Big Game Drawing. The D6 zone deer tag quota has been increased to 10,000 tags for the 2015 hunting season, an increase of 4,000 tags from 2014.

Fundraising Random Drawing Opportunities

CDFW’s fundraising random drawing tags are open to any resident or nonresident 12 years of age or older as of July 1, 2015. The cost to enter the drawings is $5.97 per entry, per hunt. Applicants may apply as many times as the wish. The sales transaction must also be completed before midnight on June 2, 2015. Applicants do not need a valid hunting license to apply, but a license must be purchased prior to issuing the tag. The tag will be issued at no additional cost.

The fundraising random drawing tags consist of the open zone deer tag, the multiple zone elk tag and the northeastern California pronghorn antelope tag. This year the program will not include a bighorn sheep tag drawing.

Open Zone Deer Tag

An open zone deer tag allows the hunter to hunt during the authorized season dates of any hunt, using the specific method and meeting any special conditions of the tag for that hunt.

Multiple Zone Elk Tag

The fundraising random drawing elk tag allows the hunter to hunt in any of the following zones: Northwestern, Northeastern, Marble Mountains, Siskiyou and La Panza. Hunters may use any legal method of take. All three subspecies of elk may be hunted, although only one elk may be harvested. The hunt dates open one week prior to the earliest season in that zone and run through the end of the regular season.

Northeastern California Pronghorn Antelope Tag

The fundraising random drawing antelope tag allows the hunter to hunt in any of the northeastern antelope zones (Mount Dome, Clear Lake, Likely Tables, Lassen, Big Valley and Surprise Valley) with any legal method. The hunt dates are from Aug. 1 to Sept. 20, 2015.

Media Contacts:
Lai Saechao, CDFW Big Game Hunting Program, (916) 928-7416
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

California Department of Fish and Wildlife News

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