Trinity River Upstream of Indian Creek Reopens for Adult Chinook Salmon Harvest on Monday, Nov. 19

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Trinity River Hatchery has determined the hatchery will have taken in more than 4,800 fall Chinook Salmon by the end of this week. According to California 2018-19 supplemental sport fishing regulations, the take of 4,800 fall Chinook Salmon at the hatchery triggers the reopening of the recreational Chinook Salmon fishery on the Upper Trinity River between the mouth of Indian Creek, near Weaverville, and Old Lewiston Bridge, at 12 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 19.

Recreational anglers will be able to harvest two Chinook Salmon, with no more than one adult greater than 22 inches, per day in this reach. The possession limit is six Chinook Salmon, and no more than three adults. Reopening this stretch of the Trinity River is designed to allow anglers to catch surplus hatchery Chinook Salmon now that the number of adults needed for spawning has been achieved at the hatchery.

The lower Trinity River, downstream of Hawkins Bar, and the upper Klamath River, upstream of I-5 near Hornbrook, are the other sections of the river that remain open to the take of adult Chinook Salmon. All other quota areas are closed to the take of adult Chinook Salmon. The take of jack salmon, those equal to or less than 22 inches, may be taken in all areas of the Klamath basin, with the exception of the mouth of the Klamath River, which is closed for the remainder of the year. The daily bag limit for jack salmon in these areas is two fish per day and no more than six in possession.

Anglers may monitor the quota status of open and closed sections of the Klamath and Trinity rivers by calling the information hotline at (800) 564-6479.

For more information regarding Klamath River fishing regulations, please consult the 2018-2019 California Freshwater and Supplemental Sport Fishing Regulations at wildlife.ca.gov/regulations.

CDFW Shuts Down Black-Market Marijuana Grow in Trinity County

On Nov. 6, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) served a search warrant on a black-market marijuana cultivation operation at the 1700 block of Hidden Valley Road in Trinity County.

The property contained an unpermitted water diversion, water pollution violations, over 900 unprocessed growing marijuana plants and 5,069 pounds of untested black-market marijuana bud.

water tanks 2

During routine flights over Trinity County, CDFW observed more than 600 marijuana plants and numerous large water tanks with a large black irrigation hose leading into dense vegetation along a creek. CDFW verified that the grow was unlicensed by the state and unpermitted by the county. A record check on the property showed no CDFW Lake or Streambed Alteration Agreement (LSAA) had been filed, no state license to grow marijuana and no attempt to legitimize the operation in the county.

CDFW’s Watershed Enforcement Team (WET), which includes a combination of law enforcement officers and scientific staff, inspected the property and detained 32 suspects. Some of the suspects were armed and wearing bullet proof vests. Two suspects had a fake police officer badge. Eleven were booked into Trinity County jail on multiple felony charges related to environmental crimes. The others were released.

Eleven Fish and Game Code violations were documented including a substantial water diversion from a tributary to the South Fork Trinity River, which provides critical breeding and juvenile rearing habitats for steelhead trout, Chinook Salmon, and several species of aquatic amphibians, including the Foothill yellow-legged frog, a candidate for state threatened species status.

The water diversion consisted of a large hose that was actively funneling water to multiple water storage tanks. Unpermitted water diversions like this are capable of dewatering streams during the summer months, which can reduce or eliminate the reproductive success of the aquatic species that rely on these habitats.

“Black-market grows prevent legitimized cultivators from thriving, harm California’s sensitive natural resources with diverted waterways and illegal pesticides and put untested cannabis products on the black-market,” said David Bess, Deputy Director and Chief of the CDFW Law Enforcement Division. “We support the legal cannabis market where cultivators obtain permits, take action to prevent environmental impacts and comply with applicable state and local laws.”

CDFW collaborated with the Trinity County Sheriff’s Office, the Trinity County Environmental Health Department and the US Forest Service on the mission. CDFW would like to remind the public to report environmental crimes such as water pollution, water diversions and poaching to the 24/7 CalTIP hotline at (888) 334-2258.

Media Contacts:
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 895-3988

 

Commercial Spiny Lobster Fishery Closure Lifted in State Waters Around Anacapa Island

Today the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Director Charlton H. Bonham lifted the commercial spiny lobster fishery closure in state waters around Anacapa Island, Ventura County as recommended by state health agencies.

According to the memo from the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, analysis of spiny lobster samples by California Department of Public Health (CDPH) laboratories indicates that spiny lobster taken from this area no longer pose a significant human health risk due to elevated levels of domoic acid. The commercial spiny lobster fishery is now open statewide and the CDPH advisory to recreational anglers has been lifted.

For More Information:
Memo from Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (11/16/18)
www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Health-Advisories

Media Contact:
Jordan Traverso, CDFW Communications, (916) 654-9937

CDFW and Partners Host Free Cannabis Permitting Workshops in Inland Empire

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) are hosting free cannabis permitting workshops in Palm Desert, Adelanto and Needles from December 4-6, 2018.

Workshops are open to cannabis cultivators, consultants and anyone interested in the topic.

The workshops include presentations from CDFW and SWRCB on the requirements and process of obtaining proper permits for cannabis grows. Workshop attendees will have time to talk with agency staff about individual projects. Representatives from the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s CalCannabis Cultivation Licensing Division and county permitting and planning departments will also be available to answer questions.

The workshops will be held on the following dates:

Tuesday, Dec. 4
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (presentations at 10:30 a.m.)
Coachella Valley Association of Governments
73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite 115
Palm Desert, Calif. 92260

Wednesday, Dec. 5
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (presentations at 10:30 a.m.)
Adelanto Stadium
12000 Stadium Way
Adelanto, Calif. 92301

Thursday, Dec. 6
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (presentations at 10:30 a.m.)
El Garces Room
950 Front Street
Needles, Calif. 92363

For more information, please visit CDFW’s cannabis program webpage at www.wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/cannabis and the SWRCB cannabis program webpage at www.waterboards.ca.gov/cannabis.

Media Contacts:
Heather McIntire, CDFW Cannabis Program, (707) 210-4415
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 895-3988

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

At its Nov. 15 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $3.18 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the eight approved projects will benefit fish and wildlife — including some endangered species — while others will provide public access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, landowners and the local community.

Funding for these projects comes from a combination of sources including the Habitat Conservation Fund and bond measures approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources.

Funded projects include:

  • Acceptance of a no-cost conservation easement over approximately 2,325 acres of Humbug Valley land by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), to be held with the Feather River Land Trust as co-grantee for a cooperative project with the Maidu Consortium and Pacific Gas and Electric. This project will protect the culturally significant Tàsmam Koyòm homeland of the Maidu, and provide wildlife corridors, future wildlife-oriented public use opportunities, and protection of the Yellow Creek fishery, near Chester in Plumas County. (photo above)
  • A $96,000 grant to the Mojave Desert Land Trust to acquire approximately 320 acres of land for the protection of desert habitat corridors in the Morongo Basin, near the community of Joshua Tree in San Bernardino County.

    Vast, dry desert with scattered scrub vegetation under a clear blue sky
    Desert habitat in San Bernardino County’s Morongo Basin. WCB photo
  • A $1.7 million grant to the City of Arcata and Humboldt State University for a cooperative project with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CALFIRE), CDFW and the Resources Agency to acquire approximately 967 acres of land within the Jacoby Creek watershed, and the acceptance of a conservation easement over the property by CALFIRE.

    A shallow creek with rocky banks flows through lush green firest
    Jacoby Creek, near Arcata in Humboldt County. WCB photo
  • A $250,000 grant to the East Bay Regional Park District for a cooperative project with the Bureau of Reclamation to replace the fishing dock, upgrade restrooms and provide ADA access at the Channel Point area of Contra Loma Regional Park, in the City of Antioch in Contra Costa County.

    An old, boardwalk with wood railing passes through reeds in a calm lake, to a wooden fishing dock.
    Fishing dock at Channel Point in Contra Loma Regional Park, Contra Costa County. WCB photo

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

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Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

California Department of Fish and Wildlife News