Sacramento Man Pleads Guilty to Commercial Bobcat Poaching

A Sacramento County man recently pled guilty to multiple criminal charges and was fined for unlawfully trapping dozens of bobcat and fox for commercial purposes in northern California.

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Tracy Lee Shultz, 57, from Courtland was fined $5,000 and forfeited 60 poached bobcat and fox pelts worth almost $15,000 on the commercial market. Schultz ultimately pled guilty to several violations of the Fish and Game Code, including taking bobcat outside of the established season, unlawful capture and confinement of a live mammal, possession of unlawfully taken pelts, knowingly filing false information to obtain bobcat tags and unlawfully taking wildlife for profit or personal gain. He is also prohibited from hunting, fishing, trapping or accompanying anyone on such a trip during his one-year probation.

In November 2012, Lassen County CDFW Warden Nick Buckler received an anonymous tip from a hunter that commercial bobcat traps were being set before the season opened. Warden Buckler started his investigation, during which he spent nearly every day and night of the 70-day season living out in the sage, bitterbrush, and rim-rock of remote Lassen County observing and documenting the trapper.

“Sometimes the smallest bit of information can lead to a large scale investigation,” said Buckler. “I feel lucky to live and work in a county that cares so much about its fish, wildlife and habitats. The illegal commercialization of wildlife is second only to the illegal trade in drugs and guns for worldwide revenue. There will always be people willing to break laws and exploit wildlife to make money.”

Warden Buckler spent three months observing Schultz, documenting his movements, and locating and monitoring his traps in order to obtain sufficient evidence. At one point during the season, Schultz returned to his Sacramento County home for a week leaving a spotted skunk trapped in freezing temperatures. After Sacramento County game wardens relayed that Schultz remained at home for several days, Warden Buckler released the trapped animal unharmed.

On Jan. 31, 2013, two teams of wildlife officers served search warrants on locations in Sacramento and Modoc counties. The two teams seized a large volume of evidence from Schultz, including his ATV, trailer, trapping journal, trapping, skinning and storage equipment, nearly 50 large commercial live traps, and 60 illegally taken bobcat and gray fox pelts.

Trapping bobcat for commercial purposes is legal in California with a season that starts on Nov. 24 of each year. Trappers licensed through CDFW are required to check their traps and remove all captured animals at least once daily. Schultz had about 50 tagged live traps set throughout more than 900 square miles of remote Lassen and Modoc counties. This extensive trapping area made it impossible for Shultz to check each trap daily, and allowed him to trap more area, spend less gas and cheat other trappers who followed the law.

Pursuant to state law, all the furs were sold to a licensed fur dealer and the $14,835 check was held in an account while the case was underway. As part of the conviction, the Lassen County Superior Court judge ordered the money paid to the Lassen County Fish and Game Commission, where it will be used to promote and support lawful hunting and fishing, as well as fund wildlife habitat improvement and restoration in the county.

Many times cases such as this could not be made without the assistance of sportsmen and sportswomen who help wildlife officers by reporting poaching and pollution. It often takes the help of concerned citizens in conjunction with the county district attorney’s office to reach successful outcomes.

“Now more than ever wardens need the assistance of the public to protect our valuable natural resources,” Buckler said. “Hunters, anglers, trappers and citizens can be our eyes and ears on the ground. License plates, descriptions and accurate locations are the best information the public can provide.”

CDFW officers patrol more than 220,000 square miles of ocean and 159,000 square miles of land in California, while the number of wardens has increased in the last few years, California still has the lowest number of wildlife officers per capita in the United States.

If you witness a wildlife crime, you are encouraged to call the 24-hour toll free CalTIP hotline at (888) 334-2258. All calls can be kept anonymous.

Media Contact:
Nick Buckler, CDFW Law Enforcement, (530) 440-6381
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

Hill and canyon covered in chaparral, sage and scrub

The chaparral-sage-scrub-habitat of Puerco Canyon

View of the ocean and undeveloped coast hills from hilltop in Los Angeles County

View of the Pacific from Puerco Canyon, Los Angeles County. WCB photo

A lone tree on a rolling, grassy plain

West side of Dry Creek Ranch. WCB photo

A wood and wire fence on a plain of green grass

Northern boundary of Dry Creek Ranch, Merced County. WCB photo

At its May 22 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $22.1 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 23 funded projects will provide benefits to fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide the public with access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, land owners and the local community. The funds for all these projects come from bond initiatives approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources. Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $4.5 million grant to Humboldt County for a cooperative project with the State Coastal Conservancy and the Natural Resources Agency to acquire approximately 1,000 acres of land for the protection of a mixed conifer forest property, including riparian corridors, salmonid streams, coastal watershed and habitat linkages, and to expand future wildlife oriented public use opportunities.
  • A $3.2 million grant to Sanctuary Forest Land Trust to acquire a conservation easement over approximately 2,612 acres of land for the protection of a mixed conifer working forest with riparian corridors, salmonid streams, coastal watersheds and habitat linkages near the community of Whitehorn in Humboldt and Mendocino counties.
  • A $1.7 million grant to the National Audubon Society for a cooperative project with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Students and Teachers Restoring a Watershed to enhance and restore approximately 260 acres of the Sonoma Creek Marsh on San Pablo Bay, within the boundary of the USFWS’s San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 15 miles southeast of the city of Sonoma in Sonoma County.
  • A $531,000 grant to the Santa Cruz Resource Conservation District for a cooperative project with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Fisheries Restoration Grant Program, the USFWS, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the California Conservation Corps, the Coastal Conservancy and others to restore approximately 10 acres of riparian and wetland habitat in areas critical to special status amphibian and fish species on four coastal watersheds in Santa Cruz County.
  • Accepted a USFWS Recovery Land Acquisition grant and approved a sub-grant of these federal funds to the California Rangeland Trust. Approved a WCB grant to the California Rangeland Trust for a cooperative project with the U.S Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Bureau of Reclamation to acquire a conservation easement over approximately 4,417 acres of land for the protection of grassland and associated vernal pools, blue oak woodland and riparian habitats to promote recovery of threatened and endangered species near the community of Snelling in Merced County.
  • A $4.5 million grant to the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority for a cooperative project with the State Coastal Conservancy and the County of Los Angeles to acquire approximately 700 acres of land for the protection of chaparral, coastal sage scrub, scrub-oak chaparral, native grasslands and oak woodland-savannah habitat and to enhance wildlife linkages, watershed protection and provide future wildlife oriented public use opportunities, located in the central Santa Monica Mountains, near the community of Malibu, in Los Angeles County.
  • Accepted a USFWS Habitat Conservation Plan Land Acquisition grant of $786,750 and approved a sub-grant of these federal funds to the Friends of the Palm Spring Mountains (FOPSM). Approved a Wildlife Conservation Board grant to FOPSM, for a cooperative project with the Coachella Valley Mountains Conservancy to acquire approximately 353 acres of high desert, desert alluvial fan and habitat linkages to promote recovery of the Peninsular bighorn sheep and other threatened and endangered species covered under the Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan, along the lower elevations of the San Jacinto mountains near the northwest border of the city of Palm Springs, in Riverside County.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

Wildlife Conservation Board funds environmental improvement and acquisition projects

lush, green riparian habitat on a far northern California creek

Strawberry Creek in Humboldt County. WCB photo

dry-looking pebble plain habitat with green forest in background

Sawmill Pebble Plain in San Bernardino County. WCB photo

large northern California cree with both grassy and rocky shoreline surrounded by trees and brush

Cow Creek Conservation Area near Redding. WCB photo

Marshy wetland with yellow wildflowers near Richmond

Wetland habitat in Breuner Marsh, at Point Pinole Regional Shoreline. WCB photo

Dry, rolling hill with few trees behind flat land with mostly dry grass.

Blue Oak Ranch Reserve in Santa Clara County. WCB photo

Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

At its Feb. 20 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $14 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 16 funded projects will provide benefits to fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide the public with access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, land owners and the local community. The funds for all these projects come from bond initiatives approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources. Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $253,000 grant to the Pacific Coast Fish, Wildlife and Wetlands Association for a cooperative project with Redwood National Park and the Fisheries Restoration Grant Program to restore approximately 1,600 linear feet of riparian habitat for Coho salmon and steelhead trout on Strawberry Creek, approximately 1.5 miles west of Orick in Humboldt County.
  • A $650,000 grant to the Shasta Land Trust (SLT) to acquire a conservation easement over approximately 600 acres of land to protect rangeland, riparian, floodplain and riverine habitat and provide habitat connectivity with the adjoining protected lands referred to as the Cow Creek Conservation Area, north of State Highway 44, about 10 miles east of the City of Redding in Shasta County.
  • A $1 million grant to the East Bay Regional Park District for a cooperative project with the State Coastal Conservancy and others to restore approximately 164 acres of wetland habitat in Breuner Marsh, at Point Pinole Regional Shoreline, five miles north of the city of Richmond in Contra Costa County.
  • A $4.2 million grant to the Regents of the University of California to construct new staff housing and storage facilities, enhance a campground, improve existing structures for visiting researchers and upgrade roads and other infrastructure at the Blue Oak Ranch Reserve, approximately 9 miles east of the City of San Jose in Santa Clara County.
  • A $2 million grant to the San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust to acquire approximately  166 acres of very rare and endangered pebble plain habitat that supports a wide variety of endemic plant species, just south of Big Bear Lake in the San Bernardino Mountains, in San Bernardino County.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

Wildlife Conservation Board funds environmental improvement and acquisition projects

Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

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At its Sept. 4 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $8.6 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 10 funded projects will provide benefits to fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide the public with access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, land owners and the local community. The funds for all these projects come from bond initiatives approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources. Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $172,000 grant to the Tehama County Resource Conservation District for a cooperative project with the landowners and the Natural Resources Conservation Service to initiate planning, design, and environmental review on two ranches in Tehama County: the Leininger Ranch and the C&R Ranch, approximately 10 miles east and 17 miles west of the City of Corning, respectively.
  • A $1.4 million grant to the River Partners for a cooperative project with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Department of Water Resources and others to restore approximately 599 acres of riparian habitat at the confluence of the Tuolumne and San Joaquin rivers in Stanislaus County.
  • A $3 million grant for a cooperative project with the River Partners, Department of Water Resources and the Packard Foundation, to acquire in fee approximately 466 acres of valley floodplain and riverine habitat for protection of threatened and endangered species located approximately 10 miles west of the City of Modesto, just south of the confluence of the Tuolumne and San Joaquin rivers, in Stanislaus County.
  • A $1 million grant to the River Partners for a cooperative project with the City of San Diego to restore approximately 100 acres of riparian and oak woodland habitat on City of San Diego property just upstream of Lake Hodges, near Escondido in San Diego County.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

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Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

At its June 4 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $21.8 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 19 funded projects will provide benefits to fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide the public with access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, land owners and the local community. The funds for all these projects come from bond initiatives approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources.

Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $1.4 million grant to the Bear Yuba Land Trust to acquire approximately 652 acres of land along the Bear River in Nevada County, for the purpose of wildlife habitat protection including riparian, riverine and oak woodland habitat communities.
  • A $3 million grant to Truckee Donner Land Trust for a cooperative project with Placer County, Northern Sierra Partnership, the Trust For Public Land and private donors to acquire two parcels totaling approximately 2,520 acres of land in Nevada and Placer counties, in order to protect alpine forests and meadows, wildlife corridors and habitat links, and provide future wildlife-oriented public use opportunities.
  • A $5 million grant to Sonoma Land Trust (Trust) for a cooperative project with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Federal Highway Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Department of Water Resources and State Coastal Conservancy to restore 955 acres of tidal marsh on the Trust’s Sears Point Property in Sonoma County, five miles east of the city of Novato.
  • A $660,000 grant to Big Sur Land Trust to assist with the acquisition of a conservation easement over approximately 964 acres of land to preserve and protect native oak woodland, grassland, riparian and wildlife habitat, and sustain working landscapes in Monterey County, 6 miles northeast of the city of Salinas.
  • A $570,000 grant to the California Rangeland Trust to assist with the acquisition of a conservation easement over approximately 575 acres of land approximately 12 miles south of Lake Isabella in Kern County to preserve, protect and sustain the rangeland, grazing land, grassland, working landscapes, wildlife habitat, and watersheds.
  • Acceptance of settlement funds from the U.S. Department of the Interior Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Fund (a.k.a. ARCO funds), and a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Land Acquisition grant and the approval to sub-grant the ARCO funds and $260,000 grant funds to The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to acquire approximately 286 acres of land just south of community of Acton in Los Angeles County to protect habitat for threatened and endangered species, and maintain habitat connectivity within the upper Santa Clara River floodplain and watershed in Arrastre Canyon, a tributary to the Santa Clara River.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

California Wildlife Conservation Board Named Conservationist of the Year

March 7, 2013
Contact:
John Donnelly, Wildlife Conservation Board, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

The Wildlife Society’s (TWS) Western Section awarded the California Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) the 2013 Conservationist of the Year Award. This annual award is given to a person or group engaged in wildlife conservation – either as a profession or as an avocation – that has made an outstanding contribution to wildlife conservation in California, Nevada, Hawaii or Guam. These award recipients have demonstrated an active concern for wildlife conservation by accomplishing projects or programs that have significantly enhanced wildlife resource conservation within the Western Section geographical area.

Originally created within the California Department of Natural Resources in 1947, and later placed with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the WCB is a separate and independent Board with authority and funding to carry out programs for wildlife conservation. The WCB’s three main functions are land protection, habitat restoration and development of wildlife-oriented public access facilities. Over the past ten years, the WCB has encumbered more than one billion dollars to protect and restore hundreds of thousands of acres of precious wildlife habitats. In 2012 alone, approximately $89 million in WCB expenditures were matched by nearly $97 million in partner contributions. That money was used to acquire nearly 15,000 acres of wildlife habitat, protect nearly 33,000 acres of wildlife habitat through the acquisition of conservation easements, restore and enhance more than 4,000 acres of critical wildlife habitats, and develop or improve eight separate public access facilities.

“We are honored to receive this award,” said John P. Donnelly, WCB’s Executive Director, “especially given the fact that we were recognized by scientists and habitat managers from both inside and outside California, many of whom work internationally as well. The dedicated staff working here at the WCB made this award possible.”

The award was presented recently at the Western Section’s Annual Meeting in Sacramento. Founded in 1936 as the Society of Wildlife Specialists and renamed The Wildlife Society the following year, TWS is an international non-profit scientific and educational association dedicated to excellence in wildlife stewardship through science and education. Their mission is to enhance the ability of wildlife professionals and wildlife students to conserve diversity, sustain productivity, and ensure responsible use of wildlife resources and their habitats. Their members actively manage forests, conserve wetlands, restore endangered species, conserve wildlife on private and public lands, resolve wildlife damage and disease problems, and enhance biological diversity.  The Western Section of TWS is comprised of over 1000 wildlife managers, biologists, ecologists, and students from California, Nevada, Hawaii and Guam, all devoted to the sustainable conservation of wildlife in the western United States region.

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

Site of a new ADA-accessible restroom and enclosed fish cleaning station at Crescent City Harbor, funded by the California Wildlife Conservation Board. Ken Anderson/WCB photo.

Site of a new ADA-accessible restroom and enclosed fish cleaning station at Crescent City Harbor, funded by the California Wildlife Conservation Board. Ken Anderson/WCB photo.

Crescent City Harbor, site of a new ADA accessible restroom and enclosed fish cleaning station funded by the California Wildlife Conservation Board.

Crescent City Harbor, site of a new ADA accessible restroom and enclosed fish cleaning station funded by the California Wildlife Conservation Board.

November 30, 2012

Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, Wildlife Conservation Board, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, DFG Communications, (916) 322-2420

The Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved $18.8 million to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California at its Nov. 29 quarterly meeting. The 21funded projects will provide benefits to fish and wildlife species, including some endangered species, and provide public access opportunities to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, the landowner and the local community. The funds for all of these projects come from recent bond initiatives approved by the voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources.

Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $527,000 grant to the Crescent City Harbor District for a project to construct a new ADA-accessible restroom and enclosed fish cleaning station at the Crescent City Harbor in Crescent City, Del Norte County.
  • A $250,000 grant to the East Bay Regional Park District to replace two fishing piers, improve bank erosion control, and improve access pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act at Lake Temescal Regional Recreation Area in Oakland, Alameda County.
  • A $2.7 million grant to the Pacific Forest Trust for a cooperative project with the Sierra Nevada Conservancy to acquire a working forest conservation easement on approximately 2,175 acres of mixed conifer forest lands near the community of Railroad Flat, Calaveras County.
  • A $2.5 million grant to the Land Trust of Santa Cruz County to acquire approximately 1,210 acres of land for the protection of habitat linkages and working forest property in the Pajaro Hills, Santa Cruz and Santa Clara counties.
  • A $685,000 grant to the Mojave Desert Land Trust (MDLT) to acquire approximately  624 acres of land for the protection of desert habitat corridors leading south to the Joshua Tree National Park, located west of the community of Joshua Tree, San Bernardino County.
  • A $952,000 grant to the San Elijo Lagoon Conservancy to assist in a partnership project to restore approximately 180 acres of habitat in the Carlsbad Hydrologic Unit and the San Luis Rey Watershed in San Diego County.

For more information about the WCB, please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

DFG Opens New Hunter Check Station in North Grasslands Wildlife Area

Contact:
Steve Miyamoto, DFG Wildlife Habitat Supervisor II, (209) 827-6586
Media Contact:
Janice Mackey, DFG Communications, (916) 322-8908

 New Facility in Merced County Will Serve Thousands Each Year

 The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) announces it will open its new Salt Slough – San Luishunter check station on Oct. 20.

New Salt Slough – San Luis hunter check station opens on Oct. 20

“This new facility will allow us to offer the hunting community expedited services during busy times, which will make their experience in the wildlife area even more enjoyable,” said Regional Manager Jeff Single. The new check station will provide service to an average 7,700 hunters each year in the Gadwall and Salt Slough units of the North Grasslands Wildlife Area, and the San Luis, South Freitas, West Bear Creek and East Bear Creek units of the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

“Since 1947, when the Wildlife Conservation Board was established, there has been funding earmarked each year to provide public access for hunting, fishing or other wildlife-oriented recreation,” said Wildlife Conservation Board Director John Donnelly. “I’m pleased to be carrying on this tradition for the North Grasslands Wildlife Area. Our investment in this project will support generations of Californian hunters for years to come.”

Located in Merced County, the North Grasslands Wildlife Area lies within the San Joaquin River basin. The area is important to Pacific Flyway populations and supports numerous duck, goose and pheasant species.

Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Environmental Improvement and Acquisition Projects

Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, Wildlife Conservation Board, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, DFG Communications, (916) 322-2420

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At its August 30 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved $24.1 million to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. The 22 funded projects will provide benefits to fish and wildlife species, including some endangered species, and others will provide public access opportunities to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, the landowner and the local community. The funds for all of these projects come from recent bond initiatives approved by the voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources.

Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $7.8 million grant for the acquisition of four conservation easements totaling approximately 6,224 acres of Conaway Ranch land in Yolo County by the Department of Fish and Game (DFG) for the protection of threatened and endangered species and wetland, floodplain and riparian habitat areas. In addition, the Department of Fish and Game contributed $4 million from Proposition 84 funds to complete purchase of the easements. Three of the easements are designated for the protection and recovery of specific species, including Swainson’s hawk, giant garter snake and tri-colored black bird. The fourth conservation easement encumbers 4,000 acres and protects existing aquatic and migratory bird habitat by restricting land uses to current wildlife-friendly agricultural practices on the property. All the easements allow for continuation of agricultural uses, as long as those uses maintain the resource values as described under the conservation easements.
  • A $610,000 grant to the Marin Agricultural Land Trust (MALT) for a cooperative project with the State Coastal Conservancy to acquire a conservation easement over approximately 447 acres of land on the Barboni Ranch complex. This easement, located eight miles southwest of Petaluma in the northern area of rural Marin County, is for the protection of native oak woodland habitat that includes coast live oak, Canyon live oak, blue oak and valley oak and for the protection and preservation of sensitive biological resources.
  • A $900,000 grant to Kern River Corridor Endowment and Holding Company, Inc., for a cooperative project with the Central Valley Project Improvement Act program (CVPIA), the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to restore approximately 159 acres of riparian and associated saltbush scrub habitat for the benefit of rare species, including the Bakersfield cactus, San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard and yellow billed cuckoo, and to provide potential future wildlife-oriented public use opportunities on the Lower Kern River Panorama Vista Preserve (Preserve) located near the City of Bakersfield in Kern County.

For more information about the WCB, please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

Mountain Lion Attacks Man in Nevada County

The California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) has confirmed a mountain lion attacked a 63-year-old man who was camping northwest of Nevada City. The attack occurred in the early morning hours of July 1.

The man was traveling through Nevada County on a planned hiking trip and decided to stop for the night to sleep. He laid a sleeping bag out along a tributary to the Yuba River. Approximately 1 a.m. he was attacked in his sleeping bag for what he reported to be between 1 ½ to 2 minutes. He said the animal attacked, bit and clawed him through his sleeping bag. He said it bit through the cap he was wearing and his clothes. The animal ceased the attack, looked at him from 15 feet away for another 15-30 seconds, then ran into the night. The man drove himself to a hospital in Grass Valley where he was treated for non-life threatening injuries and later released.

DFG wardens responded to the hospital and verified that he had suffered severe scratches and puncture wounds. They collected several articles of clothing and his sleeping bag, which were analyzed at DFG’s Wildlife Forensics Laboratory in Sacramento. Wardens also responded to the attack scene where they found lion tracks. Specially trained dogs attempted to track the lion but were not successful. They also found the remains of one domestic cat with injuries consistent with a lion attack. The effort to find the lion continues.

California has now had 15 confirmed mountain lion attacks since 1890. A summary of previous mountain lion attacks in California can be found at
http://www.dfg.ca.gov/news/issues/lion/attacks.html.

For more information about how people and lions can coexist, please see http://www.dfg.ca.gov/keepmewild/lion.html.

Representatives from DFG will be available for comment in front of the Natural Resources Agency building at 1416 9th Street in Sacramento at 1 p.m.

Contacts:
Warden Patrick Foy, DFG Law Enforcement, (916) 508-7095
Mike Taugher, DFG Communications, (916) 591-0140

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