Wildlife Conservation Board funds environmental improvement and acquisition projects

Media Contacts:
John Donnelly, WCB Executive Director, (916) 445-0137
Dana Michaels, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-2420

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At its Sept. 4 quarterly meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $8.6 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 10 funded projects will provide benefits to fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide the public with access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that integrate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices beneficial to the environment, land owners and the local community. The funds for all these projects come from bond initiatives approved by voters to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources. Some of the funded projects include:

  • A $172,000 grant to the Tehama County Resource Conservation District for a cooperative project with the landowners and the Natural Resources Conservation Service to initiate planning, design, and environmental review on two ranches in Tehama County: the Leininger Ranch and the C&R Ranch, approximately 10 miles east and 17 miles west of the City of Corning, respectively.
  • A $1.4 million grant to the River Partners for a cooperative project with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Department of Water Resources and others to restore approximately 599 acres of riparian habitat at the confluence of the Tuolumne and San Joaquin rivers in Stanislaus County.
  • A $3 million grant for a cooperative project with the River Partners, Department of Water Resources and the Packard Foundation, to acquire in fee approximately 466 acres of valley floodplain and riverine habitat for protection of threatened and endangered species located approximately 10 miles west of the City of Modesto, just south of the confluence of the Tuolumne and San Joaquin rivers, in Stanislaus County.
  • A $1 million grant to the River Partners for a cooperative project with the City of San Diego to restore approximately 100 acres of riparian and oak woodland habitat on City of San Diego property just upstream of Lake Hodges, near Escondido in San Diego County.

For more information about the WCB please visit www.wcb.ca.gov.

Application Approaching for San Diego County Dove Hunt

The application deadline for dove hunting in the at Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve is approaching quickly and hunters are encouraged to apply immediately. Only 20 hunters will be allowed to participate.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and Upland Game Bird Stamp Program manage this unique opportunity to hunt for dove in the Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve in San Diego County. Applications are due Wed. Aug. 14 at 4 p.m. and are available on the CDFW website at http://www.dfg.ca.gov/hunting/.

The dove hunt is Sat. Sept. 7, from 6 a.m. to sunset at the Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve in east San Diego County, between the towns of Jamul and Dulzura. The selected hunters will have access to the reserve from check-in time to sunset and may hunt in parties up to four people. Use of dogs is optional but dogs much be kept on a leash and in the owners immediate control at all times. CDFW will not be providing dogs for the hunt.

All hunters must have a valid 2013 hunting license and the proper hunter safety equipment in order to participate and will be allowed to take a maximum legal limit of dove. CDFW wildlife officers will be on hand to check equipment and ensure compliance with hunting laws and regulations.

For more information contact Nick Bechtel, CDFW Region 5 at (805) 965-3059.

Applications are available http://www.dfg.ca.gov/hunting/, for questions regarding application process please call (916) 445-3565.

Media Contacts:
Nick Bechtel, CDFW Region 5, (805) 965-3059
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

CDFW Begins Stocking Trout in San Diego County Lake

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) last week stocked tagged and non-tagged rainbow trout at Lake Miramar in San Diego County for the first time.

CDFW will begin stocking Lake Miramar because the lake is in an urban setting and represents the potential to be a very popular urban fishery. The lake, which in the past was stocked by the city of San Diego, historically is very popular with anglers.

“I remember as a kid, growing up in Temecula, hearing stories about the trout fishing at Lake Miramar, and even having my mom drop me and friends off to fish while she went shopping,” said Russell Black, CDFW  fisheries biologist. “I am excited about this. It’s good for everyone: the city, the Department and most importantly the public.”

Some of the stocked rainbow trout will have $10 reward tags, which CDFW hopes will increase angler interest and recreational activities at the lake. Signs will be posted at access points around the lake with information on how to collect the rewards for tagged trout, and mail-in cards will be placed at the concessions.

Tag returns will provide valuable information to department biologists, including information on angler success, harvest rates and catch per unit of effort. This information will ultimately help the department assess trout plants.

All fish plants are subject to change depending on road, water, weather and operational conditions. Stocking is scheduled to resume in the fall.

Media Contacts:        
D. Russell Black, CDFW Region 5, Inland Fisheries (858) 467-4262
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

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