Tag Archives: hunter education

Joint Release of Federal Recovery Plan for Salmon and Steelhead and Conservation Strategy for California’s Ecosystem Restoration Program

noaa cdfw logos

SACRAMENO, Calif. – NOAA Fisheries and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) today jointly released two plans to restore populations of salmon and steelhead in California’s Central Valley: NOAA Fisheries’ Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Recovery Plan and CDFW’s Ecosystem Restoration Program (ERP) Conservation Strategy.

The two plans are complementary in that CDFW’s conservation strategy presents a broader framework for restoring aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems throughout the Central Valley, while the federal recovery plan focuses on the recovery of endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon, threatened Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon, and threatened Central Valley steelhead.

A shared goal of both plans is to remove these species from federal and state lists of endangered and threatened species. The recovery plan provides a detailed road map for how to reach that goal. It lays out a science-based strategy for recovery and identifies the actions necessary to restore healthy salmon and steelhead populations to the Central Valley.

“Establishing clear priority watersheds, fish populations and actions is essential to achieve recovery,” said Maria Rea, NOAA Fisheries Assistant Regional Administrator for California’s Central Valley Office. “Implementation of this plan will depend on many parties working collaboratively to pool resources, expertise and programs to recover Chinook salmon and steelhead populations that are part of California’s natural heritage.“

Recovery plans required by the Endangered Species Act are guidance documents, not regulatory requirements, and their implementation depends on the voluntary cooperation of multiple stakeholders at the local, regional, state and national levels.

“The Sacramento Valley joins together a world-renowned mosaic of natural abundance: productive farmlands, meandering rivers that provide habitat and feed salmon and steelhead, wildlife refuges and managed wetlands, and cities and rural communities,” said David Guy, President of the Northern California Water Association. “The recovery plan is a positive step forward–through efficient management of the region’s water resources, water suppliers throughout the Sacramento Valley will continue to work with our conservation partners to help implement the recovery plan and improve ecological conditions in the Sacramento River for multiple species and habitat values.”

The ERP conservation strategy was developed by CDFW collaboratively with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries to help guide environmental restoration and establish adaptive management to improve restoration success in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and its watershed. The approach of conservation strategy is to restore or mimic ecological processes and to improve aquatic and terrestrial habitats to support stable, self-sustaining populations of diverse and valuable species.

“It is critical we make strategic investments in our natural resources,” said Charlton H. Bonham, Director of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. “The funding of these high-priority restoration projects is not only an example of the coordinated effort between state and federal governments, but an example of California’s continued efforts to minimize the effects of drought on fish and wildlife. Central Valley salmon and steelhead deserve nothing less.

California Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr.’s 2014-15 budget provided CDFW with $38 million to implement enhanced salmon monitoring, restore sensitive habitat, improve water infrastructure for wildlife refuges, expand the fisheries restoration grant program, and remove barriers for fish passage. Some of that money will be used on projects recommended by the federal recovery plan.

Dick Pool of the Golden Gate Salmon Association said, “We thank and congratulate the scientists of NOAA Fisheries for their outstanding work in developing the Central Valley Recovery Plan. GGSA and the salmon industry particularly appreciate the fact that the plan includes both short range and long range actions that can reverse the serious salmon and steelhead population declines. GGSA has identified a number of the same projects as needing priority action. We also commend the agency for its diligent efforts to engage the other fishery agencies, the water agencies and the salmon stakeholders in the process. We look forward to assisting in finding ways to get the critical projects implemented.”

The federal recovery plan and state conservation strategy work together as a blueprint of how at-risk species can be restored to sustainable levels.Restoring healthy, viable salmon and steelhead runs will preserve and enhance the commercial, recreational and cultural opportunities for future generations. As the fish populations grow and recover, so too will the economic benefits and long-term fishing opportunities for everyone.

“The Recovery Plan provides a clear framework to better coordinate and align restoration projects in the Delta, the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries to achieve greater conservation outcomes,” said Jay Ziegler, Director of External Affairs and Policy for The Nature Conservancy. “We are pleased to see the integration of multiple habitat values in the Plan including the importance of expanding lateral river movements to enhance floodplain habitat and recognition of the importance of variable flow regimes to benefit multiple species.”

The development of a recovery plan is an important part in the successful rebuilding of a species because it incorporates information from a multitude of interested parties including scientific researchers, stakeholders and the general public. Since 2007, NOAA Fisheries has held 14 public workshops, produced a draft for public comment, and met with strategic stakeholders to guide the plan’s development and ensure a comprehensive and useful document.

CDFW will be investing considerable resources in improving water conservation on public wildlife refuges in the Central Valley and protecting important salmon stocks that contribute to the state’s fishery. The department has also recently released a restoration grant solicitation which includes salmon and steelhead watersheds in the Central Valley. The solicitation can be found here. Applications are being accepted until August 12, 2014.

More on the NOAA Fisheries Recovery Plan and the CDFW Ecosystem Restoration Program

Contact:
Jim Milbury, NOAA Fisheries Communications, (562) 980-4006
Clark Blanchard, CDFW Communications, (916) 651-7824

CDFW to Offer Upland Game Hunting Clinic in Northern California

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Advanced Hunter Education will offer an upland game hunting clinic on Saturday, Aug. 23 at Hasting Island Hunting Preserve, near Rio Vista.

Designed for hunters of all skill levels, the clinic will be led by an experienced certified California Hunter Education instructor. Topics to be covered will include hunting regulations, where to hunt, hunting alone vs. hunting with others, hunting with or without a dog, proper types of firearms and ammunition for upland game hunting, upland game bird habitat, and hunter responsibilities and ethics. The clinic will include dog handling and game care demonstrations.

The clinic will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $45 for adults. Youths 16 years and younger are free but must be accompanied by an adult.

CDFW’s Advanced Hunter Education Program will provide all necessary class equipment. Space is limited, so participants are asked to preregister online at www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/advanced/index.aspx. After registering, participants will receive an email with a map to the facility and a list of items to bring.

Hastings Island Hunting Preserve is located approximately 8 miles north of Rio Vista.

Media Contacts:
Lt. Dan Lehman, CDFW Advanced Hunter Education Program, (916) 358-4356
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

CDFW to Offer Waterfowl Hunting Clinic in Northern California

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Advanced Hunter Education Program and the California Waterfowl Association will jointly sponsor a waterfowl hunting clinic on Saturday, Aug. 16 at Grizzly Ranch, near Suisun.

Designed for hunters of all skill levels, the clinic will be led by an experienced certified California Hunter Education instructor. Topics to be covered will include decoy placement, blind design, waterfowl calling, duck identification, appropriate waterfowl hunting gear, hunter safety, game care and cooking tips. Information will also be provided on hunting state wildlife areas and federal refuges.

The clinic will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $45 for adults. Youths 16 years and younger are free but must be accompanied by an adult.

CDFW’s Advanced Hunter Education Program will provide all necessary class equipment. Space is limited, so participants are asked to preregister online at www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/advanced/waterfowl_grizzly.aspx. After registering, participants will receive an email with a map to the facility and a list of items to bring.

Grizzly Ranch is located approximately 9 miles south of Suisun City.

Media Contacts:
Lt. Dan Lehman, CDFW Advanced Hunter Education Program, (916) 358-4356
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

CDFW to Offer Wild Pig Hunting Clinic in Monterey County

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Advanced Hunter Education Program and the Pacific Coast Hunter Education Association will jointly offer a wild pig hunting clinic on Saturday, April 12. The clinic will be held in Lockwood in Monterey County.

Designed for all skill levels, the clinic will cover wild pig biology, methods for locating wild pigs, laws and regulations for pig hunting, hunting and field dressing techniques and the care of wild game.

The clinic will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $45 for adults. Youths 16 years and younger are free but must be accompanied by a registered parent or guardian. CDFW’s Advanced Hunter Education Program will provide all necessary class equipment.

An optional $10 barbecue lunch (country ribs, salad, beans and a drink) will be available for purchase from the Pacific Coast Hunter Education Association the day of the clinic.

Space is limited and preregistration is required. Registration forms can be found online at www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/advanced/index.aspx. After registering, participants will receive an email with a map to the facility and a list of items to bring.

Media Contacts:
Lt. Dan Lehman, CDFW Advanced Hunter Education Program, (916) 358-4356
Kirsten Macintyre, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8988

pig on range

 

Southern California Turkey Hunting Clinic Coming Soon

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Advanced Hunter Education Program and the Hunter Education Instructor Association of Southern California are jointly sponsoring a turkey-hunting clinic on March 15 at Hungry Valley Recreation Area in Los Angeles County.

Space is limited so hunters are encouraged to apply early. The deadline for registration is 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28.

An experienced instructor, Alex Van will instruct this exciting clinic and cover topics of decoy placement, blind design, ballistics, calling, equipment, game care and cleaning, cooking tips and safety.

The clinic is Saturday, March 15 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and costs $45. Youths 16 years and younger are free but must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

CDFW’s Advanced Hunter Education Program will provide all necessary class equipment.

Registration forms are available online at http://www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/advanced/index.aspx. After registering, participants will receive an e-mail with a map to the facility and a list of items to bring.

Hungry Valley is located along Interstate 5 near Gorman, approximately 30 miles south of Bakersfield and 60 miles north of Los Angeles.

Media Contact:       
Lt. Dan Lehman, Advanced Hunter Education Program Coordinator, (916) 358-4356
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

Wild Turkey

CDFW Hunter Education Courses Offered for Eastern Sierra Youths

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is offering a series of hunter certification classes in Inyo and Mono counties for teenagers who would like to learn to hunt. Students who successfully complete a class will earn a lifetime hunter education certificate, necessary for purchasing a hunting license.

“Last year we brought the hunter education to several schools in the Eastern Sierra and every one of them asked us to come back this year,” said Lt. Bill Daily, CDFW supervising warden for the area. “It’s very encouraging to see how many of the students took an interest in not only the hunting but the conservation as well.”

The courses will be offered at no charge for seventh and eighth graders in Bishop, Big Pine, Round Valley, Mammoth Lakes and Coleville schools. Parental or guardian approval is required for all students.

In addition to serving as a prerequisite to purchasing a hunting license, hunter education programs are a valuable education tool for beginning hunters to learn about firearm and hunting safety. The hunter education program produces responsible, knowledgeable and involved citizens – young men and women who understand the importance of complying with hunting laws, behaving ethically and wildlife conservation.

The one- or two-hour daily classes are taught by CDFW officers during the regular school day or immediately afterward. Classes will be offered at the following locations:

  • Jan. 6-17 at Mammoth Lakes Middle School
  • Jan. 21-Feb. 2 at Big Pine Middle School
  • Jan. 27-Feb. 7 at Bishop Middle School
  • Feb. 4-21 at Round Valley Middle School
  • Feb. 24-March 7 at Coleville Middle School

Youth interested in attending the classes must attend seventh or eighth grades at a participating school. Parents may register their child through the school administration office.

Media Contacts:
Bill Dailey, CDFW Law Enforcement, (661) 203-6380
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

Deadline Approaching for Hunter Education Course in Eastern Sierra

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife is now registering participants for the last hunter certification classes of the season in Inyo and Mono counties. The class is scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014, from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Bishop Civic Center’s Counsel. The deadline to register is Jan. 11.

The class is for those who have already completed the online portion of the mandatory hunter education course to receive a hunting license. Inyo and Mono county residents who want to obtain their hunting license may complete the basic study portion online at their own pace, followed up by the four-hour certification class with wildlife officers. To register for the online portion of the course, please go to www.huntercourse.com/usa/california/.

After completing the online course and receiving a passing test score, a $24.95 fee will be charged for a completion voucher. Applicants will need to bring this document to the final certification class in order to receive a hunter education certificate. The four-hour follow-up class consists of two hours of review, one hour of gun handling techniques and one hour for the hunter education test.

Applicants must pre-register for the follow-up class. Registration closes one week prior to the class. To register, please contact Warden Shane Dishion at (760) 920-7593.

A complete list of hunter education classes statewide may be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/classes-home-study.aspx.

Media Contacts:
Shane Dishion, CDFW Law Enforcement, (760) 920-7593
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

CDFW Law Enforcement Active at Eastern Sierra Deer Opener

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) officers contacted more than 800 hunters while patrolling more than 14,000 square miles of Inyo and Mono counties during the deer season opener that started Sept. 20. During the opening weekend, 13 CDFW wildlife officers issued eight citations and 22 warnings.

Violations included hunting deer without a valid deer tag in possession, having loaded guns in a vehicle on a public roadway, overlimits of trout, speeding and driving without insurance.

Officers also conducted a wildlife checkpoint operation to promote safety, education and compliance with law and regulations through education, preventative patrol and enforcement.

On Monday, Sept. 23, the southbound lanes of Highway 395 were reduced to one lane and all vehicles traveling south on U.S. 395 were screened by the CDFW’s law enforcement officers. Screening consisted of an introduction and brief questions. Approximately 2,000 vehicles were contacted. Of those, 262 vehicles submitted to an inspection. A total of four violations were found, including three deer tagging violations, and one angler was found to have an overlimit of trout (32 trout). Several hunters were warned for not fully filling out their Deer Harvest Report Cards.

Average screening took less than 20 seconds per vehicle and the average inspection took about two minutes and 30 seconds per vehicle. If violations were found, the occupants were detained and issued citations.

CDFW also provided informative literature about the invasive quagga mussel and New Zealand mud snail to help reduce the spread of these invasive species.

Media Contacts:
Lt. Bill Daily, CDFW Law Enforcement, (760) 872-7360
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

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Application Deadline Approaching for San Diego County Upland Game Hunt

The application deadline for a dove and quail hunt in the San Felipe Wildlife Area is approaching quickly and hunters are encouraged to apply immediately. Only 20 hunters will be allowed to participate.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and Upland Game Bird Special Hunts Program manage this unique opportunity to hunt for dove and quail in San Diego County. Please visit https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/DFGSpecialHunts/Default.aspx to view and apply for these special hunts. Applications are due Wednesday, Oct. 23 at 4 p.m.

The hunt will be held Saturday, Nov. 9, from 6 a.m. to sunset at the Oakgrove unit of the San Felipe Wildlife Area, 25 miles south of the intersection of Interstate 15 and Temecula Parkway (Highway 79), 1.5 miles south of Oakgrove Ranger Station (Highway 79) or 12 miles north of Warner Springs. Selected hunters will have access to the reserve from check-in time to sunset and may hunt in parties up to four people. Use of dogs is optional. CDFW will not be providing dogs for the hunt.

All hunters must have a valid 2013 hunting license and the proper hunter safety equipment in order to participate and will be allowed to take a maximum legal limit of birds. CDFW wildlife officers will be on hand to check equipment and ensure compliance with hunting laws and regulations.

For more information about the hunts, please contact Nick Bechtel at (805) 965-3059. For questions regarding application process please call (916) 445-3565.

Media Contacts:
Nick Bechtel, CDFW South Coast Region, (805) 965-3059
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

CDFW and the California Waterfowl Association Offer One-day Outdoor Expo

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Hunter Education Program and the California Waterfowl Association are sponsoring an outdoor exposition on Aug. 3 at Waterloo Gun and Bocci Club in Stockton. The free expo includes trap shooting, archery and pellet gun shooting for all ages and ability levels.

Scheduled events will include the Grasslands Regional Duck Calling Contest, goose calling, two-man live duck calling and youth calling contests. There will also be a youth trap shooting competition with prizes. Food and vendor booths and a swap meet also will be included in the event.

The expo will run from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

The first 100 participants to preregister online will get a free round of trap shooting (targets and ammo included). See www.calwaterfowl.org for more information.

The Waterloo Gun and Bocci Club is located at 4343 Ashley Lane in Stockton, off Waterloo Road.

Contacts:
Lt. Shawn Olague, CDFW Central District Hunter Education Coordinator, (209) 564-2070
George Oberstadt, CWA Heritage Programs, (916) 275-0961