August 2014 California Department of Fish and Wildlife Calendar

Media Contact:
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

DATE — EVENT

Weekends — Elkhorn Slough Ecological Reserve. Docent-led walks are scheduled every Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Binoculars and bird books are available for the public to borrow at no cost. The visitor center and main overlook are fully accessible. Day use fee is $4.32 per person, age 16 and older. Groups of 10 or more should schedule a separate tour. For more information, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/lands/er/region4/elkhorn.html.

Every Monday (except holidays) — Volunteer Stewardship Field Crew Mondays at Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, 1700 Elkhorn Road, Royal Oaks (95076), 10 a.m. to noon. Help preserve natural habitat by collecting seeds, planting, helping to maintain trails and weeding introduced species. For more information, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/lands/er/region4/elkhorn.html or email www.elkhornslough.org.

CDFW Climate College, CDFW is offering the second year of its Climate College in 2014. This course focuses on how climate change affects the state’s marine resources and seeks to enhance participants’ understanding of marine-related climate change science, potential impacts to species and habitats and the implications for marine region management and planning. The course consists of a seven-part lecture series and people can participate in person or via WebEx. For more information, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/Climate_and_Energy/Climate_Change/Climate_College/ or email climatechange@wildlife.ca.gov. For the course schedule and class registration, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/Climate_and_Energy/Climate_Change/Climate_College.

1 — The Northern California Recreational Red Abalone Fishery Reopens Aug.1 and Continues through Nov. 30. The fishery is closed in July to give abalone populations a respite during a period when fishing activities would be very high. New regulations for the year include an 8 a.m. start time which reduces opportunities to take abalone during early morning low tides, a closure in the Fort Ross area and reductions in the abalone card limit (18 abalone allowed per year for Mendocino County and counties to the north and a total of nine abalone allowed per year for Sonoma and Marin counties). For more information, please visit the Abalone webpage at www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/invertebrate/abalone.asp.

1 Recreational Pacific Halibut Fishery Is Closed For the Month of August. Recreational fishing for Pacific halibut off California is closed Aug.1 through Aug. 31, and will reopen on Sept. 1 and continue through Oct. 31. For more information, please visit the Pacific halibut page at: www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/pacifichalibut.asp.

2-10 — California Invasive Species Action Week. The purpose of Action Week is to increase public awareness of invasive species issues and promote public participation in the fight against California’s invasive species and their impacts on our natural resources. To find an organized volunteer effort or activity near you, or for information on participating independently, please visit the Action Week webpage at www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/actionweek and check out the complete Schedule of Events. For more information, please call (916) 654-4267 or email Valerie.Cook- Fletcher@wildlife.ca.gov.

2 — California Invasive Species Action Week “Learn Your Local Invaders” Field Outing, 9 a.m. at the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center, 2001 Nimbus Road, Gold River (95670). Join CDFW staff for a short hike down to the American River to check crayfish traps. Learn how to identify invasive crayfishes and invasive plants, and how to inspect and clean shoes and gear to ensure that people are not transporting aquatic hitchhikers or invasive plant seeds. For more information, please call (916) 654-4267, email Valerie.Cook-Fletcher@wildlife.ca.gov or visit www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/actionweek.

4 — California Invasive Species Action Week “Learn Your Local Invaders” Field Outing, 9 a.m. at the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center, 2001 Nimbus Road, Gold River (95670). Join CDFW staff for a short hike down to the American River to check crayfish traps. Learn how to identify invasive crayfishes and invasive plants, and how to inspect and clean shoes and gear to ensure that people are not transporting aquatic hitchhikers or invasive plant seeds. For more information, please call (916) 654-4267, email Valerie.Cook-Fletcher@wildlife.ca.gov or visit www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/actionweek.

5 — California Fish and Game Commission Marine Resources Committee Meeting, 10 a.m., California State Building, Auditorium, 1350 Front Street, San Diego (92101). For more information, please visit http://www.fgc.ca.gov/meetings/2014/index.aspx.

5 — California Invasive Species Action Week Invasive Species “Film Festival,” 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center, 2001 Nimbus Road, Gold River (95670). Watch informative videos about invasive species prevention, invasive species that are impacting California and harmful invasive species that CDFW is working to keep out of the state. Check out the new invasive species coloring and fact sheets and take part in other activities as well. For more information, please call (916) 654-4267, email Valerie.Cook-Fletcher@wildlife.ca.gov, or visit www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/actionweek.

5 — Fourth installment of the Speaker Series, 7 p.m. at the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center, 2001 Nimbus Road, Gold River (95670). CDFW Invasive Species Program Environmental Scientist Valerie Cook Fletcher will present on invasive species of the American River and their pathways of spread. Jonathan Rose, Ph.D. candidate in Ecology, UC-Davis, will present on the status, biology and potential impacts of (non-native) Nerodia watersnakes in California. For more information, please call (916) 358-2884 or visit the hatchery online at www.facebook.com/NimbusHatchery.

5 — CDFW Public Workshop on Lead Bullet Ban Implementation, 7 to 8:30 p.m., CDFW South Coast Regional Office, 3883 Ruffin Road, San Diego (92123). A CDFW representative will detail a proposed implementation plan. Following the short presentation, interested parties can make comments and provide input that will help shape CDFW’s final recommendation to the California Fish and Game Commission, which CDFW anticipates presenting at the Commission’s meeting in Sacramento in September. For more information, please contact Dolores Duarte at (858) 467-2702.

6 — California Fish and Game Commission Meeting, 8:30 a.m., DoubleTree by Hilton Golf Resort, 14455 Penasquitos Drive, San Diego (92129). For more information, please visit www.fgc.ca.gov/meetings/2014/index.aspx.

7 — California Invasive Species Action Week Invasive Species “Film Festival,” 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center, 2001 Nimbus Road, Gold River (95670). Watch informative videos about invasive species prevention, invasive species that are impacting California and harmful invasive species that CDFW is working to keep out of the state and take part in other activities as well. For more information, please call (916) 654-4267, email Valerie.Cook-Fletcher@wildlife.ca.gov, or visit www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/actionweek.

9 — California Invasive Species Action Week Volunteer Invasive Plant Removal Effort, 9 a.m. to noon at the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center, 2001 Nimbus Road, Gold River (95670). Join CDFW and Department of Food and Agriculture staff and American River Parkway Foundation volunteers in removing invasive plants from around sidewalks, bike trails and in the parkway. Bring gloves, wear close-toed shoes, and long sleeves may be preferred attire. For more information, please call (916) 654-4267, email Valerie.Cook-Fletcher@wildlife.ca.gov, or visit www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/actionweek.

12 — CDFW Public Workshop on Lead Bullet Ban Implementation, 7 to 8:30 p.m., Department of General Services Building, 2550 Mariposa Mall, Fresno (93721). A CDFW representative will detail a proposed implementation plan. Following the short presentation, interested parties can make comments and provide input that will help shape CDFW’s final recommendation to the California Fish and Game Commission, which CDFW anticipates presenting at the Commission’s meeting in Sacramento in September. For more information, please contact Greg Gerstenberg at (209) 826-3464.

16 — Public Outreach Meeting Regarding Northern San Joaquin Valley Type A Wildlife Areas, 9 a.m. to noon, Grassland Water District Office, 200 W. Willmott Avenue, Los Banos (93635). The meeting will provide licensed hunters with updates on habitat conditions, availability of water for wetlands, and possible impacts to Type A hunting programs on public lands, and allow them to make comments and recommendations. State wildlife areas to be discussed are Mendota, Los Banos, Volta and North Grasslands, including the Salt Slough, China Island, Gadwall and Mud Slough units. For more information and to arrange seating, please email Sean.Allen@Wildlife.ca.gov.

16 — Archery Bear Season Opens and extends through Sept. 7. For more information, please visit the Hunting in California Bear Page at www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/bear/.

19 — CDFW Public Workshop on Lead Bullet Ban Implementation, 7 to 8:30 p.m., Chaffey College, 9375 Ninth Street, Rancho Cucamonga (91730). A CDFW representative will detail a proposed implementation plan. Following the short presentation, interested parties can make comments and provide input that will help shape CDFW’s final recommendation to the California Fish and Game Commission, which CDFW anticipates presenting at the Commission’s meeting in Sacramento in September. For more information, please contact Katrina Banda at (909) 466-8462.

22 — Warden Academy Graduation. Eighteen Warden Cadets will graduate from the California Game Warden Academy scheduled at 10 a.m. at the Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise (95969). For more information, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/enforcement/career/index.aspx.

25 — Rearing Salmon in the Yolo Bypass Lecture, 1-3 p.m. in the Natural Resources Building Auditorium, 1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento (95814). This lecture is part of the Conservation Lecture Series which introduces participants to California’s diverse wildlife. Carson Jeffres, the field and laboratory director for the UC Davis Center for Watershed Science, will discuss research on the use of harvested rice fields as potential salmon nurseries. Since 2012, Jeffres has been studying whether flooded post-harvest rice fields can act as a surrogate for this lost habitat. He has found that juvenile Chinook salmon on flooded rice fields grow at some of the fastest freshwater growth rates of juvenile salmon ever found in California. This free event will also be webcast live. To register, please visit www.dfg.ca.gov/habcon/lectures. For more information, please contact margaret.mantor@wildlife.ca.gov.

28 — California Wildlife Conservation Board Meeting, 10 a.m., State Capitol, Room 112, Sacramento (95814). For more information, please visit www.wcb.ca.gov or call the Wildlife Conservation Board at (916) 445-8448.

CDFW Announces Upland Game Bird Hunting Opportunities in Southern California

Media Contact:
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is announcing three special dove hunts in San Diego County.

The first opportunity is slated for Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 from 5:30 a.m. to noon at Oak Grove, a sub unit of San Felipe Wildlife Area, in San Diego County. This hunt will take place on CDFW property located off highway 79, 1.5 miles south of the Cleveland National Forest Oak Grove Campground. This hunt will accommodate up to 20 hunters.

The second and third opportunities are at Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve and slated for Sept. 7 and Nov. 9, 2014 from sunrise to sunset. These hunts will take place on CDFW property located off highway 94 (Campo Road), between the towns of Jamul and Dulzura. These hunts will accommodate up to 20 hunters each.

The deadline to apply is Aug. 13, 2014 by 4 p.m. Applicants may include up to four hunters on each application. Dogs are allowed on these hunts but they must remain in the immediate control of the hunters at all times. No dogs will be provided for this event.

For more information, please call the CDFW South Coast Region’s Upland Game Bird Special Hunt Program at (805) 965-3059.

Applications are available online at http://www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/uplandgame/.
*Click: Game Bird Special Hunts Program

Any questions regarding application process, please call (916) 445-3565.

CDFW Offers One-day Waterfowl Hunting Clinic in Redding

Contacts:
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944
Lt. Dan Lehman, Advanced Hunter Education Program, (916) 358-4356

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Advanced Hunter Education Program and California Waterfowl Association are sponsoring a waterfowl hunting clinic in Redding on Saturday, Sept. 20. The clinic is designed to teach waterfowl hunting techniques and will accommodate all skill levels.

The clinic will be taught by CDFW’s Chief of Enforcement Mike Carion and Warden Aaron Freitas both experienced hunters. Topics to be covered are decoy placement, blind design, waterfowl calling, duck identification, hunting gear, game care, cooking tips and safety. Information will also be provided on hunting state wildlife areas and federal wildlife refuges. If you want to learn how to hunt waterfowl successfully in northern California, this is the clinic for you.

The clinic will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014.

The cost is $45 and space is limited. Youth 16 years and younger are free but must be accompanied by adult.

Participants must register in advance at: http://www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/advanced/waterfowl_redding.aspx

After registering, participants will receive an email with a map to the facility and a list of items to bring.

CDFW To Hold Public Workshop on Lead Bullet Ban Implementation

Media Contact:
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

Public Contact:
Katrina Banda, CDFW Inland Desert Region, (909) 466-8462

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will hold a public workshop Tuesday, August 19 to discuss the implementation of the lead bullet ban. The workshop will be held at Chaffey College at 9375 Ninth Street in Rancho Cucamonga from 7-8:30 p.m.

A CDFW representative will detail a proposed implementation plan, the PowerPoint is available on the CDFW website. Following the short presentation, interested parties can make comments and provide input that will help shape CDFW’s final recommendation to the Fish and Game Commission, which CDFW anticipates presenting at the Commission’s meeting in Sacramento in September.

Last year, Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 711 requiring that the Commission adopt a regulation to ban lead ammunition in the state no later than July 1, 2015, with full implementation of the ban to occur no later than July 1, 2019. Governor Brown has directed CDFW and the Commission to work with all interested parties in order to produce a regulation that is least disruptive to the hunting community.

In order to determine what is least disruptive to hunters, CDFW has been reaching out to interested parties this year in a number of ways, including question and answer sessions at sportsmen’s shows, meetings with hunting organizations and now a series of public workshops throughout the state. This is the final workshop in the series. Workshops were held in Ventura in April, Eureka in June, and Redding in July. Others are planned for Sacramento on July 29, San Diego on August 5 and Fresno on August 12. In addition, individuals and organizations may email comments to wildlifemgmt@wildlife.ca.gov (please use “Nonlead implementation” in the subject line) or mail hard copy correspondence to:

CDFW, Wildlife Branch
Attn: Nonlead implementation
1812 9th Street
Sacramento, CA 95811

CDFW Opens Chimineas Unit of Carrizo Plain Ecological Reserve for Apprentice Deer Hunters

Media Contacts:
Robert Stafford, CDFW Environmental Scientist, (805) 528-8670

Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is offering a draw for an apprentice deer hunt on the Chimineas Unit of the Carrizo Plain Ecological Reserve.

The two-day hunt, which is being offered in cooperation with the California Deer Association (CDA), will be held Sept. 13-14 on the 30,000-acre reserve in San Luis Obispo County. A mandatory hunter orientation will be held in the evening on Sept. 12. Overnight lodging will be available at the main ranch house on the ecological reserve on Sept. 12 and 13.

Three apprentice hunters will be chosen by lottery. Selected apprentice hunters must be accompanied by an adult. Participants will receive classroom, range and field training in gun handling techniques and safety, deer hunting and game care. Hunts will be led by CDA volunteers. CDA will also provide breakfast, lunch and dinner on Sept. 13, and breakfast and lunch on Sept. 14.

Applicants must submit a postcard with the hunter’s name, address, telephone number and 2014-2015 junior hunting license number (GO ID number) to:  Chimineas Apprentice Deer Hunt, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, 3196 South Higuera Street, Suite A, San Luis Obispo 93401. Only one postcard may be submitted per applicant.

Applications must be received by 5 p.m. on Aug. 8. Late or incomplete applications will not be entered in the draw. Successful applicants will be notified by phone and will receive additional information, including maps and special regulations, prior to the hunt.

Southern California Man Ordered To Pay $10,000 for Commercial Fishing Violations

Media Contacts:
Capt. Rebecca Hartman, CDFW Law Enforcement, (310) 678-4864
Janice Mackey, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8908

A Southern California man was given a stiff fine this week for a series of commercial fishing violations in Los Angeles County.

Adam Crawford James, 32, of Winnetka was sentenced to three years probation and revocation of all California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) licenses for the duration of his sentence. In addition, he was ordered to pay $7,000 to the Fish and Game Preservation Fund and an additional $3,000 to the city of Santa Monica in fines and penalty assessments.

James pleaded no contest to four Fish and Game Code misdemeanor counts, including the illegal take of fish and invertebrates, the take of sea urchin without a permit, failure to obtain a receiver’s license, selling fish to person not licensed as a fish receiver and failure to pay landing taxes.

In 2013, CDFW wildlife officers received information from the CalTIP hotline that James was attempting to sell commercially caught fish to restaurants without a receiver’s license. In California, commercial fishermen are permitted to sell their catch directly to restaurants provided they have a receiver’s license.

CalTIP (Californians Turn In Poachers and Polluters) is a confidential witness program that encourages the public to provide CDFW with factual information leading to the arrest of poachers and polluters. The toll free telephone number, (888) 334-2258 operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Callers may remain anonymous.

Joint Release of Federal Recovery Plan for Salmon and Steelhead and Conservation Strategy for California’s Ecosystem Restoration Program

noaa cdfw logos

SACRAMENO, Calif. – NOAA Fisheries and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) today jointly released two plans to restore populations of salmon and steelhead in California’s Central Valley: NOAA Fisheries’ Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Recovery Plan and CDFW’s Ecosystem Restoration Program (ERP) Conservation Strategy.

The two plans are complementary in that CDFW’s conservation strategy presents a broader framework for restoring aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems throughout the Central Valley, while the federal recovery plan focuses on the recovery of endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon, threatened Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon, and threatened Central Valley steelhead.

A shared goal of both plans is to remove these species from federal and state lists of endangered and threatened species. The recovery plan provides a detailed road map for how to reach that goal. It lays out a science-based strategy for recovery and identifies the actions necessary to restore healthy salmon and steelhead populations to the Central Valley.

“Establishing clear priority watersheds, fish populations and actions is essential to achieve recovery,” said Maria Rea, NOAA Fisheries Assistant Regional Administrator for California’s Central Valley Office. “Implementation of this plan will depend on many parties working collaboratively to pool resources, expertise and programs to recover Chinook salmon and steelhead populations that are part of California’s natural heritage.“

Recovery plans required by the Endangered Species Act are guidance documents, not regulatory requirements, and their implementation depends on the voluntary cooperation of multiple stakeholders at the local, regional, state and national levels.

“The Sacramento Valley joins together a world-renowned mosaic of natural abundance: productive farmlands, meandering rivers that provide habitat and feed salmon and steelhead, wildlife refuges and managed wetlands, and cities and rural communities,” said David Guy, President of the Northern California Water Association. “The recovery plan is a positive step forward–through efficient management of the region’s water resources, water suppliers throughout the Sacramento Valley will continue to work with our conservation partners to help implement the recovery plan and improve ecological conditions in the Sacramento River for multiple species and habitat values.”

The ERP conservation strategy was developed by CDFW collaboratively with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries to help guide environmental restoration and establish adaptive management to improve restoration success in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and its watershed. The approach of conservation strategy is to restore or mimic ecological processes and to improve aquatic and terrestrial habitats to support stable, self-sustaining populations of diverse and valuable species.

“It is critical we make strategic investments in our natural resources,” said Charlton H. Bonham, Director of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. “The funding of these high-priority restoration projects is not only an example of the coordinated effort between state and federal governments, but an example of California’s continued efforts to minimize the effects of drought on fish and wildlife. Central Valley salmon and steelhead deserve nothing less.

California Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr.’s 2014-15 budget provided CDFW with $38 million to implement enhanced salmon monitoring, restore sensitive habitat, improve water infrastructure for wildlife refuges, expand the fisheries restoration grant program, and remove barriers for fish passage. Some of that money will be used on projects recommended by the federal recovery plan.

Dick Pool of the Golden Gate Salmon Association said, “We thank and congratulate the scientists of NOAA Fisheries for their outstanding work in developing the Central Valley Recovery Plan. GGSA and the salmon industry particularly appreciate the fact that the plan includes both short range and long range actions that can reverse the serious salmon and steelhead population declines. GGSA has identified a number of the same projects as needing priority action. We also commend the agency for its diligent efforts to engage the other fishery agencies, the water agencies and the salmon stakeholders in the process. We look forward to assisting in finding ways to get the critical projects implemented.”

The federal recovery plan and state conservation strategy work together as a blueprint of how at-risk species can be restored to sustainable levels.Restoring healthy, viable salmon and steelhead runs will preserve and enhance the commercial, recreational and cultural opportunities for future generations. As the fish populations grow and recover, so too will the economic benefits and long-term fishing opportunities for everyone.

“The Recovery Plan provides a clear framework to better coordinate and align restoration projects in the Delta, the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries to achieve greater conservation outcomes,” said Jay Ziegler, Director of External Affairs and Policy for The Nature Conservancy. “We are pleased to see the integration of multiple habitat values in the Plan including the importance of expanding lateral river movements to enhance floodplain habitat and recognition of the importance of variable flow regimes to benefit multiple species.”

The development of a recovery plan is an important part in the successful rebuilding of a species because it incorporates information from a multitude of interested parties including scientific researchers, stakeholders and the general public. Since 2007, NOAA Fisheries has held 14 public workshops, produced a draft for public comment, and met with strategic stakeholders to guide the plan’s development and ensure a comprehensive and useful document.

CDFW will be investing considerable resources in improving water conservation on public wildlife refuges in the Central Valley and protecting important salmon stocks that contribute to the state’s fishery. The department has also recently released a restoration grant solicitation which includes salmon and steelhead watersheds in the Central Valley. The solicitation can be found here. Applications are being accepted until August 12, 2014.

More on the NOAA Fisheries Recovery Plan and the CDFW Ecosystem Restoration Program

Contact:
Jim Milbury, NOAA Fisheries Communications, (562) 980-4006
Clark Blanchard, CDFW Communications, (916) 651-7824

Recreational Pacific Halibut Fishery is Closed for the Month of August

Media Contacts:
Melanie Parker, CDFW Marine Region, (831) 649-2814

Carrie Wilson, CDFW Communications, (831) 649-7191

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) wants to remind anglers that recreational fishing for Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) is closed for the month of August. The season will reopen on Sept. 1 and run through Oct. 31.halibut photo

When the season reopens, both the daily bag and possession limit of Pacific halibut will be one fish and there will be no minimum size limit.

Pacific halibut fishing regulations are developed through a collaborative regulatory process involving CDFW, the Pacific Fishery Management Council, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the California Fish and Game Commission, the International Pacific Halibut Commission and other west coast states. For more details regarding Pacific halibut management, please visit the CDFW website at http://www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/pacifichalibut.asp.

 

 

CDFW To Hold Public Workshop on Lead Bullet Ban Implementation

Media Contact:
Kyle Orr, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8958

Public Contact:
Greg Gerstenberg, CDFW Central Region,  (209) 769-1196

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will hold a public workshop Tuesday, August 12 to discuss the implementation of the lead bullet ban. The workshop will be held at the Department of General Services Building at 2550 Mariposa Mall in Fresno from 7-8:30p.m.

A CDFW representative will detail a proposed implementation plan, the PowerPoint is available on the CDFW website. Following the short presentation, interested parties can make comments and provide input that will help shape CDFW’s final recommendation to the Fish and Game Commission, which CDFW anticipates presenting at the Commission’s meeting in Sacramento in September.

Last year, Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 711 requiring that the Commission adopt a regulation to ban lead ammunition in the state no later than July 1, 2015, with full implementation of the ban to occur no later than July 1, 2019. Governor Brown has directed CDFW and the Commission to work with all interested parties in order to produce a regulation that is least disruptive to the hunting community.

In order to determine what is least disruptive to hunters, CDFW has been reaching out to interested parties this year in a number of ways, including question and answer sessions at sportsmen’s shows, meetings with hunting organizations and now a series of public workshops throughout the state. A public workshop was held in Ventura in April, Eureka in June and Redding in July. Others are planned in Sacramento on July 29 and San Diego on August 5. After Fresno, planning is underway for a workshop in Rancho Cucamonga. In addition, individuals and organizations may email comments to wildlifemgmt@wildlife.ca.gov (please use “Nonlead implementation” in the subject line) or mail hard copy correspondence to:

CDFW, Wildlife Branch
Attn: Nonlead implementation
1812 9th Street
Sacramento, CA 95811

 

CDFW to Hold Public Meetings on Proposed Low-Flow Closure of the Russian River

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will hold two public meetings to discuss the proposed low-flow closure changes to the Russian River and North Central Coast streams.

The first meeting is Wednesday, July 30 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board, 5550 Skylane Blvd., Suite A, in Santa Rosa. The second meeting is Thursday, July 31 from 3 to 6 p.m. at the Gualala Community Center, 47950 Center St. in Gualala near the intersection of Center Street and South Highway 1.

A CDFW representative will detail the proposed regulation changes. Following the short presentation, interested parties can make comments and provide input that will help shape CDFW’s final recommendation to the Fish and Game Commission, which CDFW anticipates presenting at the Commission’s meeting in Van Nuys in December.

The Russian River and other North Central Coast streams provide critical life-stage habitat for coastal Chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead trout. All three of these species are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). Coho salmon is also listed under the California ESA.

CDFW is preparing regulatory changes for Title 14, Chapter 3, Article 4, section 8, part (b) to add low-flow fish restrictions to the Russian River and base the closure of North Central Coast streams on one or more stream gauges on rivers that are more representative of these North Central Coast streams than the current regulated flows of the Russian River. These proposed regulatory actions are based upon fishery impact concerns that have arisen during the past three years of drought conditions. During the past two winters, salmon entering these streams were forced to congregate into the remaining pools below restricted passage areas, and then were subject to heavy angling pressure. In both years the Russian River and North Central Coast streams have dropped to mere trickles, yet have remained open to fishing till an emergency closure was enacted by the Fish and Game Commission in February 2014. This emergency action expired on April 30, 2014.

The two public meetings are being led by CDFW to solicit public comments regarding the regulatory changes that are proposed to protect these ESA-listed fish while still providing sport fishing opportunities. In addition to these public meetings, individuals and organizations may submit comments in writing. The written comments can be sent by email to ryan.watanabe@wildlife.ca.gov, or by mail addressed to CDFW, Bay Delta Region, Attn: Ryan Watanabe, 5355 B Skylane Drive, Santa Rosa, CA 95403.

 

Media Contacts:
Ryan Watanabe, CDFW Fisheries Branch, (707) 576-2815
Andrew Hughan, CDFW Communications, (916) 322-8944

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